Cases reported "Dermatitis"

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1/6. Estrogen dermatitis that appeared twice in each menstrual period.

    A 23-year-old woman presented with millet-sized red papules that were scattered over her chest and abdomen. She stated that since the age of 20, she had recurrently suffered from pruritic eruptions that coincided with ovulation and the time prior to menstruation, and that they persisted for a few days before vanishing spontaneously leaving some pigmentation. A skin biopsy specimen revealed spongiotic bullae in the epidermis and marked infiltration of lymphocytes accompanied by some histiocytes and eosinophils in the upper dermis. An intradermal test for conjugated estrogen showed an urticarial reaction that faded in about four hours. Although the test did not strictly meet the criterion (erythema to remain for more than 24 hours for papulovesicular eruptions), it was concluded that the timing of the episodes along with the result of the test suggested that a diagnosis of estrogen dermatitis was highly probable. There have been several reports of this condition since it was first reported as a distinct entity in 1995; but whatever the reasons, the flares were observed only before menstruation in these cases, despite the fact that the serum estrogen levels showed a double-peaked pattern during each menstrual period. This is considered to be a rare case of estrogen dermatitis that flared twice in each menstrual period. Limited improvement was noted in the symptoms even without treatment.
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2/6. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis.

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent polymorphous skin manifestations, which appear or are exacerbated during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The hallmarks for diagnosis include premenstrual flare, its prevention with the inhibition of ovulation, and positive skin reaction to intradermal injection of progesterone. The mainstay of treatment is to inhibit the secretion of endogenous progesterone by suppressing ovulation. Bilateral oophorectomy may be necessary in patients with severe and refractory symptoms. We report herein the case of a 38-year-old woman who developed recurrent and cyclic vesiculobullous eruptions clinically suggestive of erythema multiforme or autoimmune bullous diseases. The skin manifestations turned out to be APD. The patient was treated with tamoxifen 20 mg daily with complete symptom remission after 4 months.
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3/6. A case of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis in an adolescent female.

    BACKGROUND: progesterone-induced dermatitis is a rare disorder. It typically occurs in females due to an autoimmune phenomenon to endogenous progesterone production, but can also be caused by exogenous intake of a synthetic progestin. Here, we present a case of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (AIPD) seen in an adolescent female. CASE: The patient is a 15-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history and no prior exogenous hormone use, who presented to her primary care physician complaining of cyclic skin eruptions. She noted that her dermatologic symptoms occurred monthly, just prior to her menses. An intradermal skin test using 0.1 cc of progesterone was performed. The patient immediately developed a wheal, confirming the diagnosis of AIPD. The patient was begun on a continuous regimen of an oral contraceptive pill with 30 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.15 mg of levonorgestrel. The skin eruptions have not returned since the initiation of this therapy. CONCLUSION: Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis manifests via the occurrence of cyclic skin eruptions. women with the disorder commonly present with dermatologic lesions in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. diagnosis of AIPD is confirmed by performing a skin allergen test using progesterone. Due to its rarity, AIPD should be considered a diagnosis of exclusion. In cases believed to be due to an endogenous production of progesterone, several methods of therapy have been attempted. The ultimate goal of therapy is the suppression of ovulation, which will prevent endogenous hormone production as progesterone is only produced in ovulatory cycles. Currently, the first-line choice of therapy is a combination oral contraceptive. If this treatment is ineffective, patients have been treated with danazol, gonadotropin releasing hormone analogs, tamoxifen, and oophorectomy with varying success.
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4/6. The role of intradermal skin testing and patch testing in the diagnosis of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis.

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is a rare clinical condition in which patients display hypersensitivity to endogenous progesterone. It manifests as a cyclical cutaneous eruption that flares during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, when progesterone levels peak, and resolves partially or completely a few days after menses. Its cutaneous manifestations are variable and include urticaria, eczematous eruptions, vesiculopustular eruptions, fixed drug eruptions, stomatitis, erythema multiforme, and anaphylaxis. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis has been diagnosed previously with intradermal skin testing or intramuscular progesterone challenge. Treatment of progesterone hypersensitivity generally consists of ovulation inhibition with pharmaceutical agents or oophorectomy; other therapies (eg, thalidomide) have also been used with success. We report a case of cyclical erythema multiforme (EM) induced by hypersensitivity to endogenous progesterone in a patient with a history of past oral contraceptive use. After herpes simplex virus was ruled out as an etiologic factor, a diagnosis of progesterone hypersensitivity was confirmed with intradermal skin testing. Results of subsequent patch testing with various progesterone derivatives were negative. The EM outbreaks were suppressed temporarily by continuous administration of Loestrin (ethinyl estradiol plus norethindrone), which also increased the responsiveness of the outbreaks to prednisone tapers.
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5/6. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis.

    hypersensitivity to progesterone is rare, but the occurrence of skin rash in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle or during pregnancy should alert one to this possibility. The diagnosis can be readily confirmed by intradermal testing and is eminently treatable by ovulation suppression.
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6/6. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis and stomatitis.

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is a rare clinical condition associated with variable cutaneous and mucosal eruptions such as urticaria, erythema multiforme, and eczema. Exacerbation is influenced by hormonal changes of the menstrual cycle. The patient described in this report had recurrent cyclic lesions on the skin, oral mucosa, and lips that appeared just before regular menstruation and persisted until a few days after. During each cycle, the eruptions appeared at the previously affected sites, mimicking the clinical feature of a fixed drug eruption. This rare phenomenon is attributed to an autoimmune reaction to female sex hormones. The condition failed to respond to therapy with prednisone, but improved with the use of an antiestrogen drug, tamoxifen. This medication suppresses ovulation and the post-ovulation rise in endogenous progesterone levels.
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