Cases reported "Dermatitis"

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1/11. Superficial lymphangitis with interface dermatitis occurring shortly after a minor injury: possible involvement of a bacterial infection and contact allergens.

    BACKGROUND: Linear supralymphatic eruptions with epidermal involvement have rarely been reported. OBJECTIVE: A search was made for apparent anatomical reasons and for external factors to explain the unique distribution pattern and clinical course in three cases in which the linear lesions occurred shortly after a minor injury. methods: Efforts to search for its etiology include careful outlining of the localization, bacterial culture from the site of traumatic injury, patch tests, and skin biopsies. RESULTS: Linear lesions developed along superficial lymphatic vessels and the presence of eczematous conditions around the injured sites and isolation of staphylococcus aureus from the site were observed concomitantly. The histopathological findings showed interface dermatitis. CONCLUSION: Our cases provide a unique example of the combined effects of a bacterial infection and contact allergens in the development of the linear supralymphatic eruptions.
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ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
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2/11. Acquired Blaschko dermatitis-seventh case.

    The February edition of dermatology Online Journal 2002;7(1):8, contained an article entitled Acquired Blaschko dermatitis.[1] A 64 year old patient with erythematous patches and papules in a reticulate pattern on the left upper extremity and on the left side of the chest, abdomen, back and buttock was described. Three months later, in the Department of dermatology, health Center Krusevac, we examined a 65 year old woman with similar lesions, distributed in a linear pattern on her right lower limb, following the lines of Blaschko.
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ranking = 0.021335042699884
keywords = patch
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3/11. Mid-dermal elastolysis with inflammation.

    A 71-year-old white woman had finely wrinkled, erythematous patches of skin that met the clinical and histologic criteria for mid-dermal elastolysis. In addition to the loss of mid-dermal elastin described in previous cases, histopathologic examination revealed a superficial and deep perivascular inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes and plasma cells and interstitial collections of multinucleated giant cells containing phagocytized elastin. These results support a previously postulated inflammatory pathogenesis for mid-dermal elastolysis.
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ranking = 0.021335042699884
keywords = patch
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4/11. The role of intradermal skin testing and patch testing in the diagnosis of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis.

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is a rare clinical condition in which patients display hypersensitivity to endogenous progesterone. It manifests as a cyclical cutaneous eruption that flares during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, when progesterone levels peak, and resolves partially or completely a few days after menses. Its cutaneous manifestations are variable and include urticaria, eczematous eruptions, vesiculopustular eruptions, fixed drug eruptions, stomatitis, erythema multiforme, and anaphylaxis. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis has been diagnosed previously with intradermal skin testing or intramuscular progesterone challenge. Treatment of progesterone hypersensitivity generally consists of ovulation inhibition with pharmaceutical agents or oophorectomy; other therapies (eg, thalidomide) have also been used with success. We report a case of cyclical erythema multiforme (EM) induced by hypersensitivity to endogenous progesterone in a patient with a history of past oral contraceptive use. After herpes simplex virus was ruled out as an etiologic factor, a diagnosis of progesterone hypersensitivity was confirmed with intradermal skin testing. Results of subsequent patch testing with various progesterone derivatives were negative. The EM outbreaks were suppressed temporarily by continuous administration of Loestrin (ethinyl estradiol plus norethindrone), which also increased the responsiveness of the outbreaks to prednisone tapers.
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ranking = 5
keywords = patch test, patch
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5/11. mycosis fungoides presenting as pigmented purpuric dermatitis.

    mycosis fungoides, a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, typically presents as indolent, progressive, and persistent erythematous patches or plaques with mild scaling and over time can evolve into tumor stage with tumor nodules. Other presentations include eczematous, psoriasiform, poikilodermatous, and hypopigmented patches. We report mycosis fungoides in a 14-year-old boy presenting as pigmented purpuric dermatitis and review the relevant literature. This is a rare presentation of a condition that is uncommon in the pediatric population. In our patient, histologic features were typical of mycosis fungoides presenting as pigmented purpuric dermatitis. The clinical features, pathology, molecular biology, and the relationship between these two entities are discussed.
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ranking = 0.042670085399768
keywords = patch
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6/11. Inflammatory tinea capitis caused by microsporum gypseum in a five-year-old girl.

    An otherwise healthy five-year-old girl presented for evaluation of a large patch of erythematous scaling alopecia on the vertex of her scalp. Previous attempts to treat this with various topical agents resulted in no improvement. Our evaluation included examination of fungal cultures, which grew out a colony with characteristic morphology of microsporum gypseum, supported by lactolphenol blue tease mounts, demonstrating the characteristic conidia for this fungus. Treatment was begun with oral griseofulvin, and evidence of inflammation resolved along with conversion to negative cultures for M. gypseum, although an area of scarring alopecia from the kerion remains. The epidemiologic basis, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment principles for this important geophilic organism are reviewed. physicians need to be aware of this agent of tinea capitis, since it is destructive and only responsive to oral therapy.
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ranking = 0.021335042699884
keywords = patch
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7/11. Chronic dermatitis evolving to mycosis fungoides: report of four cases and review of the literature.

    In four patients with long-standing chronic dermatitis, evolution into cutaneous T-cell lymphoma was observed. Two patients were men and two were women; they were aged forty-nine to sixty-five years at first presentation. Duration of dermatitis at admission was from two months to fifteen years, with the clinical and histologic diagnosis documented on initial examination. After another five to nine years, clinically and histologically verified mycosis fungoides occurred. In two patients, contact factors were verified as causative by results of patch testing; sensitivities documented included nickel, potassium dichromate, and formaldehyde. In a third patient, contact factors were implicated as causes, but patch testing was not performed. We propose that certain instances of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma may be caused by chronic antigenic immunostimulation with resultant malignant lymphocyte clonality.
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ranking = 2
keywords = patch test, patch
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8/11. Allergy to non-toxoid constituents of vaccines and implications for patch testing.

    We report 3 patients with persistent symptoms at vaccination sites. All were allergic to aluminium and one to thiomersal and neomycin too. Aluminium allergy causes false positive patch test reactions and we propose methods of patch testing patients with symptoms at vaccination sites in order to avoid this problem. The practical relevance of allergy to non-toxoid constituents of vaccines is discussed.
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ranking = 6
keywords = patch test, patch
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9/11. Studies of phenylketonurics with dermatitis.

    A comprehensive study was undertaken of two patients who had typical phenylketonuria (PKU) and chronic dermatitis. Hematologic, immunologic, and histologic (light and electron microscopy) studies and quantitative intracellular amino acid measurements were made from the skin and cultured fibroblasts of these patients. Findings were: (1) the complement receptor-bearing lymphocytes (EAC rosettes) were decreased; (2) both light and electron microscopic findings revealed nonspecific dermatitis; (3) fibroblastic studies suggested little or no phenylalanine hydroxylase activity in cells of patients with PKU and controls; (4) the intracellular concentration of phenylalanine was significantly higher in the skin of PKU patients than in the controls; and (5) patch tests using 50% phenylalanine in petrolatum were negative in four untreated adult PKU patients and four controls.
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ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
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10/11. Eyelid dermatitis. A common, often confounding rash.

    Five common conditions and several less common ones cause eyelid dermatitis. diagnosis and treatment depend on recognizing their characteristics, obtaining a good history, performing a careful skin examination, administering and interpreting patch tests, prescribing the proper medications at the right time, and teaching the patient how to avoid trouble in the future. A case report illustrates the importance of integration and progression of diagnostic and therapeutic steps in resolving the management challenges of eyelid dermatitis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = patch test, patch
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