Cases reported "Dermatitis"

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1/18. Avian mite bites acquired from a new source--pet gerbils: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous manifestations of avian mite bites are not well recognized by physicians or patients. Clinical signs and symptoms are usually caused by bites from avian mites that have infested domestic poultry or birds nesting in or near human habitation. This report details 2 cases of pruritic papules acquired from avian mites that had infested pet gerbils and reviews the dermatologic literature about avian mites. OBSERVATIONS: An 11-year-old boy and an unrelated 10-year-old girl each had mysterious, pruritic papules for many months before their pet gerbils were found to be infested with Ornithonyssus sylviarum (the northern fowl mite) and Dermanyssus gallinae (the chicken mite), respectively. Symptoms resolved when the gerbils were removed from the home. CONCLUSIONS: Because infestation of pet gerbils with avian mites has never been reported, cases of avian mite bites and dermatitis may have gone unrecognized or misdiagnosed. Inquiry about ownership of pet gerbils may be helpful in patients with mysterious bites.
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2/18. Optic neuropathy and central retinal vascular obstruction as initial manifestations of acute retinal necrosis.

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this brief communication is to alert ophthalmologists that optic neuropathy may herald acute retinal necrosis (ARN). CASE: A previously healthy 54-year-old man exhibited optic neuropathy as an initial presentation of ARN, 8 weeks after varicella-zoster dermatitis. OBSERVATIONS: Central retinal vascular obstruction developed subsequently in his left eye. Later, the classic presentation of ARN appeared in his contralateral eye. Systemic acyclovir therapy stopped the progression of retinitis and resulted in healing of retinal lesions in his right eye. CONCLUSIONS: This case suggests that optic neuropathy, especially with preceding herpetic dermatitis, should be suspected as the prodrome of ARN.
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3/18. Pet hamsters as a source of rat mite dermatitis.

    Rat mite dermatitis is characterized by pruritic papules in a patient exposed to the tropical rat mite Ornithonyssus bacoti. We report a case of a woman with rat mite dermatitis who developed this eruption after exposure to her pet hamster. mites were collected from the hamster and identified as O bacoti. Reported sources of rat mites, as well as avian mites and other mites that bite humans, are reviewed.
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4/18. A new member of the trombiculid mite family Neotrombicula nagayoi (acari: trombiculidae) induces human dermatitis.

    We present the first definitive evidence that the mite Neotrombicula nagayoi bites humans under natural conditions in japan. Initially, bites resulted in mild pruritus without pain. However, skin reactions increased gradually year by year with severe pruritus with pain being reported by the victim after being bitten repeatedly. Six species of trombiculid mites comprising three genera were isolated from soil samples collected from August to October in both 2001 and 2002 at a study site where a man was bitten by N. nagayoi. The dominant species was L. intermedium (72.4%) followed by L. pallidum (8.3%) and N. nagayoi (8.1%). N. nagayoi was found only in August and September. We did not detect the pathogen orientia tsutsugamushi in any of the unfed larvae, including N. nagayoi, collected from the soil samples.
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5/18. Idiopathic necrotizing dermatitis: current management.

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and demonstrate necrotizing dermatitis in infancy; an uncommon, puzzling syndrome, in which anecdotal reporting and personal experience indicates that one third of cases may require skin grafting. Much informed discussion about the pathogenesis of this distressing syndrome centres on the role of spider envenomation; and in particular on the speculative role of the Australian White-tailed spider, Lampona cylindrata. methods: We present here six cases of necrotizing dermatitis treated surgically at the Royal Children's Hospital and Mater Children's Hospital in Brisbane over the period from 1991 to 1999. Clinical history, surgical details and pathological investigations were reviewed in each case. Microbiological investigation of necrotic ulcers included standard aerobic and anaerobic culture. RESULT: nocardia and staphylococcus were cultured in two cases, but no positive bites were witnessed and no spiders were identified by either the children or their parents. All cases were treated with silver sulphadiazine creme. Two of the infants required general anaesthesia, excision debridement and split skin grafting. The White-tailed spider, Lampona cylindrata, does not occur in queensland, but Lampona murina does; neither species has necrotizing components in its venom. Circumstantial evidence is consistent with this syndrome being due to invertebrate envenomation, possibly following arachnid bites. CONCLUSION: In our experience there is insufficient evidence to impute a specific genus as the cause, at this stage of scientific knowledge. If the offending creature is a spider, we calculate that the syndrome of necrotizing dermatitis occurs in less than 1 in 5000 spider bites.
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ranking = 0.375
keywords = bite
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6/18. Ornithonyssus (acari: Macronyssidae) mite dermatitis in poultry field-workers in Almarg, Qalyobiya governorate.

    Cutaneous manifestations of bird and rat mite infestation in man are not easily recognized by physicians or patients. Clinical signs and symptoms are developed secondary to bites of mites that have infested rats, domestic poultry or birds nesting in or near human habitation and comes into contact with man. This study details 4 cases of pruritic dermatitis developed in four field workers in poultry farms in Al-Marg district, Qalyobia governorate, egypt. The zoonotic species of Ornithoyssus sp., (family Macronyssidae) was isolated from all samples collected from patients' habitat and the role played by Ornithonyssus mites in causing dermatitis in man was discussed.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = bite
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7/18. thysanoptera dermatitis.

    thysanoptera dermatitis is caused by the bite of small (1-2 mm) insects (generally thrips). Thrips usually feed on the juices of vegetables but if they reach human skin they can suck the epidermal lymph after biting. The cutaneous lesions formed are small pink and itchy papules localized mainly on the trunk and the arms. diagnosis is only possible by demonstrating that the insect is present inside one of the lesions of the skin. thysanoptera dermatitis is often misdiagnosed as mosquito bites. Although self-resolving in a few days, thysanoptera dermatitis should be known not only for the cultural and scientific training of the dermatologist but also to add more detailed diagnostic information to the generic diagnosis of 'entomodermatosis' and to confirm the benign evolution of the bites.
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ranking = 0.375
keywords = bite
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8/18. Sweet's syndrome.

    Two women are reported both of whom exhibited, after an episode of an upper respiratory tract infection, painful, erythematous, sharply demarcated plaque-like lesions on the extremities, in combination with fever. In addition, one woman also had acute polyarthritis and episcleritis. The histological features of the lesions showed a perivascular neutrophilic infiltration in the dermis without signs of vasculitis, pathognomonic of Sweet's syndrome. One patient was successfully treated, initially with aspirin and later prednisone, the other with potassium iodide. Recognition of this syndrome is important in view of the dramatic response to treatment, particularly corticosteroids.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = bite
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9/18. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and pyoderma gangrenosum after a brown recluse spider bite.

    brown recluse spider bites may result in extensive soft tissue injury, causing months of disability. We have described a patient who had a series of extensive surgical debridements after envenomation. Despite skin grafting, persistent cutaneous lesions and extensive satellitosis progressed to involve the entire lower extremity. A recent biopsy showed pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and pyoderma gangrenosum complicating the original injury. Although the role of early surgical excision and newer forms of medical treatment including dapsone and antivenom are still in evolution, recent reports suggest that the majority of patients will respond to medical therapy and may not require any surgical intervention.
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ranking = 0.625
keywords = bite
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10/18. Localized tick bite reaction.

    A woman presented with a localized tick bite reaction. The tick (Amblyomma americanum, the "lone star" tick) was still attached to the erythematous, indurated skin of the upper back. After several unsuccessful attempts at removal, a punch biopsy was performed, and the resultant histologic sections incorporated both tick and involved skin. The various systemic and localized tick bite reactions are discussed, as are the diagnostic dilemmas which may arise when the organism is no longer present. Punch biopsy is suggested as an effective means of removing the organism.
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ranking = 3.6603012921135
keywords = tick, bite
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