Cases reported "Dermatomycoses"

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1/16. Occurrence of dermatomycosis (ringworm) due to trichophyton verrucosum in dairy calves and its spread to animal attendants.

    Persistent dermatomycosis (ringworm) caused by trichophyton verrucosum affected 20 dairy calves aged between 3 months and 1 year and housed together. The infection also spread to 2 animal attendants working among the calves. The major clinical lesions observed on the affected calves were extensive alopecia and/or circumscribed thick hairless skin patches affecting the head, neck, flanks and limbs. The observed lesions persisted for more than 17 weeks and most of the calves did not respond to topical treatment with various anti-fungal drugs within the anticipated period of 9 weeks. Two animal attendants developed skin lesions that were circumscribed and itchy and there was good response to treatment following the application of anti-fungal skin ointment. Although ringworm in dairy animals in kenya has not previously been associated with spread to humans, the potential is evident from this report.
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2/16. Phoma (Peyronellaea) as zoopathogen.

    Two case reports add to the rare recorded instances of infection of man and other animals by Phoma or Phoma-like molds. Phoma cava was consistently cultured from aural dermatitis of a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and tissue sections of the ear revealed fragments of apparent pycnidial walls, as well as many septate hyphae. In the second instance, numerous Phoma-like pycnidia occurred in and upon the hairs of a young child, in a lesion initiated by trichophyton infection.
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keywords = animal
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3/16. A case of kerion celsi due to Arthroderma benhamiae identified by dna sequences of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 regions.

    We describe a case of a 4-year-old boy with a 1-month history of a purulent lesion on his scalp. His hair samples revealed fungal organisms and trichophyton mentagrophytes was cultured from the sample. We analysed the dna sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of the isolated fungus. These sequences were in accordance with T. mentagrophytes animal 4 type. In mating experiments, our strain only responded to the Arthroderma benhamiae Americano-European race ( ) mating type tester. We speculate that the patient was infected from contact with his pet guinea pig. This is the first case of a clinical isolate of A. benhamiae being identified by dna sequences of nuclear ribosomal ITS1 regions.
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keywords = animal
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4/16. hyalohyphomycosis caused by paecilomyces variotii: a case report, animal pathogenicity and 'in vitro' sensitivity.

    A case of cutaneous infection in a 25-year-old male caused by paecilomyces variotii is described. Animal pathogenicity studies with normal and cortisone-treated mice revealed the predeliction of P. variotii for skin and liver in both normal and cortisone-treated mice and for lungs and heart only in immunosuppressed mice. 5-fluorocytosine gave the best MIC value for P. variotii in vitro. This report documents for the first time that P. variotii causes cutaneous infection.
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keywords = animal
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5/16. skin infection due to Geomyces pannorum var. pannorum.

    Geomyces pannorum var. pannorum is an ubiquitous saprophytic fungus frequently isolated from the soil and from air samples. It has rarely been reported as an animal or plant pathogen and it is an occasional aetiological agent of superficial infection of skin and nails in humans. Here, we report a case of superficial infection of the skin due to this fungus in a healthy man. The patient was treated orally with terbinafine 250 mg daily and topic bifonazole with complete resolution in 2 months.
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6/16. Oral antifungal-exacerbated inflammatory flare-up reactions of dermatomycosis : case reports and review of the literature.

    Inflammatory flare-up reactions of some dermatomycoses, particularly those caused by zoophilic fungi, are typical and potentially severe adverse effects following the intake of some oral antifungals. However, this condition has not previously been reported with the most frequently used antifungals in dermatology, namely fluconazole, itraconazole, and terbinafine. In this report, we describe five patients, observed over a 10-year period, who presented with inflammatory exacerbations following oral antifungal therapy for dermatomycoses. We also review the literature on inflammatory reactions exacerbated by oral antifungal agents. Details of the patients' age, sex, occupation, and atopic background; the site of the lesion, its clinical and histologic features, and any systemic signs; the identity of the fungal pathogen; the antifungal agent taken by the patient; the time between drug intake and occurrence of the flare-up; the approach to management; and the outcome were documented for each patient. A pubmed literature search was also conducted, focusing on inflammatory exacerbations induced by griseofulvin, ketoconazole, itraconazole, fluconazole, and terbinafine. The patients were four farmers and one veterinarian (all male). All primary lesions were inflammatory dermatophytoses, including one kerion. Inflammatory exacerbation of the skin lesions started 12-24 hours after the intake of oral antifungals. Mild systemic changes, including slight fever and malaise, occurred in two cases. itraconazole 400 mg/day was implicated as the causative agent in four cases and terbinafine 250 mg/day in one case. Mycologic cultures grew Trichophytonverrucosum in four cases. Antifungal treatment was discontinued in all patients. Oral and topical corticosteroids were administered to the two patients with systemic changes; the other three patients were treated with topical corticosteroids only. Two days after the onset of corticosteroids, lower doses of itraconazole (100 mg/day) and terbinafine (125 mg/day) were reintroduced. All lesions healed after 4-5 weeks. The pubmed search did not identify any articles that described inflammatory exacerbations of dermatomycoses induced by oral antifungals.Inflammatory flare-up of dermatomycoses is a rare but potentially severe cutaneous complication of oral antifungal use. Occupational contact with animals, inflammatory dermatomycoses, and zoophilic fungi represent common features in these patients. Although evidence-based data are not available, clinical experience shows that, in addition to antifungal therapy, topical and/or systemic corticosteroids are helpful to reduce the inflammatory reactions. The cases described in this article represent the first published report of oral antifungal-exacerbated inflammatory flare-up reactions of dermatomycosis in patients taking itraconazole or terbinafine.
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keywords = animal
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7/16. tinea corporis due to microsporum canis from an asymptomatic dog.

    The patient was a 19-year-old female student who purchased a puppy from a pet shop four weeks earlier. At the time of her first examination, an annular edematous erythema with adherent scales and vesicles surrounding its margin was seen on the left forearm. On direct examination of the vesicles, fungal elements were detected, and microsporum canis was isolated. The puppy was a Pomeranian and was kept in the house at all times. No clinical lesions were seen on the puppy, and the wood's lamp test was negative. However, M. canis was isolated from the animal by the hairbrush method. Symptoms disappeared after the patient was treated topically with terbinafine cream for three weeks. Although the dog received no treatment whatsoever, there was no evidence of the disease on the pet. Results of the hairbrush method performed on the pet two and three weeks later were negative, but, at five weeks, it was again positive. Human infection with M. canis from an asymptomatic dog was demonstrated in this case. attention should be paid to preventing infections from animals without lesions.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = animal
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8/16. Cutaneous sporotrichosis in thailand: first reported case.

    A case of cutaneous sporotrichosis is reported for the first time in thailand. The infection occurred in a 33-year-old Thai female who has been in good health and had no history of previous trauma or contact with any animals. Histopathology revealed pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia of the epidermis and a combination of granulomatous and pyogenic reactions in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Typical asteroid bodies (Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon) with central yeast cells were seen. sporothrix schenckii was recovered from skin biopsy specimens. The patient responded well to the treatment with saturated solutions of potassium iodide within three months. No recurrence was seen after more than six months follow-up.
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keywords = animal
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9/16. Isolation of dysgonic strains of microsporum canis in Bilbao (spain).

    In this report, we describe five cases of dermatophytosis caused by dysgonic strains of microsporum canis which occurred in the area of Bilbao (spain). The clinical presentations and responses to treatment of these infections were apparently similar to those caused by typical strains of this species but the increasing prevalence of dysgonic and other atypical strains of M. canis and the relative stability of the dysgonic morphology are the important features shown in our study. Contact with animals was confirmed by all of the patients, but in only one case was this possible infectious origin demonstrated mycologically. One of the patients, a heroin abuser with AIDS, showed a simultaneous infection with trichophyton mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes.
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keywords = animal
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10/16. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis of the finger caused by exophiala spinifera.

    A patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis treated with prednisone had a painless soft tissue nodule develop on the dorsal aspect of the ring finger. She denied any history of hand trauma, animal exposure, or systemic symptoms such as fever or malaise. Fungal cultures performed on an aseptically obtained aspirate of this lesion demonstrated dark, olive-black creamy colonies on Sabouraud's agar. Slide cultures made from mold colonies produced slender conidial forms with annellations and spine-like conidiophores, features characteristic of exophiala spinifera. The lesion was surgically excised, and the patient was successfully treated with a course of oral itraconazole. This nodular lesion has not recurred at the time of this writing. exophiala species are difficult to differentiate, and E. spinifera may be confused with exophiala jeanselmei. A literature review will consider exophiala species and clinical manifestations produced by these dematiaceous fungi.
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keywords = animal
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