Cases reported "Dermoid Cyst"

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1/113. Fine-needle aspiration cytological features of dermoid cyst of the parotid gland: a report of two cases.

    We describe the cytological features of dermoid cyst of the parotid gland the value of preoperative diagnosis by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytological evaluation. Both patients had painless parotid masses. On physical examination, a freely movable parotid mass was found in each case. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the parotid gland in each patient. FNA in both cases showed anucleated and nucleated squamous epithelium and keratin debris. The clinical features and cytological findings in each case were interpreted as suggestive of a dermoid cyst. Histological examination of surgical specimens confirmed the presence of a dermoid cyst of the parotid gland in each case. FNA is a reliable method for preoperative diagnosis and permits selection of an appropriate form of surgical procedure for dermoid cyst of the parotid gland.
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2/113. Mature teratoma with secondary infection: case report.

    Mature teratoma (dermoid cyst) is a common disorder in women of reproductive age. Sometimes the tumor is complicated by torsion, rupture, and malignant change. However, it rarely presents with fever. We present a 38-year-old woman with an intermittent fever for 30 days, who received occasional medical treatment without improvement. She was to our clinic for evaluation and treatment; however, fever persisted for three days without clinical improvement. No definite infection source could be identified except the presence of a huge pelvic tumor. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and an ovarian dermoid cyst with infection was noted. pathology review revealed mature teratoma with superimposed infection by escherichia coli. fever impressively subsided on the fifth postoperative day. Although the majority of patients suffering from fever initially search for medical treatment at primary clinics, rare conditions such as persistent fever should be consulted by specialists to make differential diagnosis. Mature teratoma is rarely superimposed by infection and rarely causes fever. Furthermore, the possibility of fever caused by tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA) is often missed in patients with history of tubal ligation since there is a lower incidence of TOA in these unique patients. However, based on this case report, we should be alert whenever long-term fever is noted. Prompt surgical treatment for extirpation and an appropriate antibiotic treatment would be the choice of treatment in such cases.
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3/113. Nasopharyngeal teratomas and dermoids: a review of the literature and case series.

    OBJECTIVES: review the clinical differences between nasopharyngeal (NP) true teratomas and dermoids, with the addition of a case series to the literature. Additionally, review the impact of prenatal diagnosis on the management and outcome of these lesions. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of cases from the Children's Hospital Medical Center (Seattle, WA) and Madigan Army Medical Center (Tacoma, WA) with the histopathologic diagnosis of nasopharyngeal teratoma or dermoid. review of medical literature for cases reported since 1977, when prenatal diagnosis of these lesions was first reported. Only tumors of the nasopharynx were considered. methods: charts and pertinent literature were reviewed and data presented with respect to age at diagnosis, signs and symptoms, perinatal diagnosis and management, preoperative evaluation, surgical treatment, and outcome. RESULTS: The majority of lesions were diagnosed at birth, with the most common presenting symptom being respiratory distress. Teratomas had a higher incidence of maternal polyhydramnios, preterm birth, need for emergent airway management, and associated congenital abnormalities. Complete surgical excision remains the treatment of choice. Recurrences were rare, occurring only in the teratoma group. prenatal diagnosis did not have a significant impact on the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions in our review. CONCLUSIONS: Inconsistent use of a standard classification system has made differentiating between NP teratomas and dermoids difficult, although the clinical implications can be critical. NP teratomas have a higher incidence of preterm birth, neonatal airway distress, associated congenital abnormalities, need for more extensive surgical procedures, and recurrence. prenatal diagnosis has made little impact on the overall diagnosis and treatment of these lesions.
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4/113. The beneficial role of transvaginal ultrasound in the preoperative characterisation of dermoid cysts of the ovary.

    The advent of transvaginal sonography has improved the ability of radiologists to visualise both ovaries and has facilitated the preoperative characterisation of many of these lesions. We describe the beneficial role of transvaginal sonography in the accurate preoperative characterisation of dermoid cysts of the ovary in two patients and describe the characteristic features of ovarian dermoid cysts.
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5/113. Subarachnoid fat dissemination after resection of a cerebellopontine angle dysontogenic cyst: case report and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: This case report illustrates the clinical and radiological relevance of extensive intracranial subarachnoid and ventricular dissemination in dysontogenic (dermoid) tumors. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: We describe a patient with a cerebellopontine angle dysontogenic tumor. Postoperatively, the cyst disseminated fat particles extensively into the subarachnoid space. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies revealed continuous dispersion of the fat particles into the cerebral cisterns, subarachnoid space, and ventricles. INTERVENTION: Eight years of clinical and MRI follow-up demonstrated neither neurological deterioration in the patient nor growth of the multiple lesions. CONCLUSION: Intracranial subarachnoid dissemination of fat material may occur during the preoperative or postoperative course of dermoid and epidermoid cysts. Aseptic meningitis or other complications such as hydrocephalus, seizures, or cranial nerve deficits also may occur owing to spillage of intracranial cyst contents into the subarachnoid space. MRI can detect the presence of fat drops that may adhere to the surrounding structures or migrate with the cerebrospinal fluid flow. Intracranial disseminated fat particles can remain silent without radiological or neurological change, justifying a wait-and-see approach. During long-term postoperative follow-up, however, regular MRI studies and clinical examinations are necessary to avoid potential complications.
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6/113. Complete familial Currarino triad. Report of three cases in one family.

    The Currarino triad is a unique complex of congenital caudal anomalies including anorectal malformation, sacral bone abnormality, and presacral mass. In this report, the authors describe three cases with the complete Currarino triad in a family. The authors treated a 30-year-old mother with an anterior sacral meningocele, her 1-year-old son with a combination of anterior sacral meningocele and dermoid cyst, and her 4-year-old daughter with an epidermoid cyst. These three patients had associated sacral agenesis and anorectal malformations. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report describing radiological and operative findings of complete familial Currarino triad in which a mother and her two children were affected.
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7/113. Temporal dermoid--an unusual presentation.

    It is rare for a frontotemporal dermoid cyst to present as a discharging sinus, and even more rare for it to have intracranial extensions. Only a few cases of intraorbital extension have been reported. We report a 14-month-old girl who presented with all the aforementioned features. She had a temporal dermoid with three discharging sinuses over the temporal area, lower lid, and cheek. It also had an intraorbital extension through the lateral orbital wall and an intracranial extension through the temporal bone. Preoperative computed tomography was done as there was a history of "orbital cellulitis". Excision of the cyst was done using a hemicoronal-preauricular incision. A lateral orbitotomy was required to remove the orbital component in continuity with the rest of the cyst.
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8/113. A rare case of intramedullary lipoma associated with cyst.

    Intramedullary lipomas are benign tumours of the spinal cord corresponding to 1% of all primitive intramedullary tumours. We report a rare case of "true" intramedullary lipoma associated with cyst. The patient underwent subtotal resection and the diagnosis was made by histopathological examination. There was postoperative neurological improvement.
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9/113. Laparoscopic extracorporeal oophorectomy and ovarian cystectomy in second trimester pregnant obese patients.

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a modified technique for laparoscopic extracorporal oophorectomy is less complicated and safer than traditional laparoscopic oophorectomy. methods: Four obese patients in their second trimester underwent open laparoscopy for treatment of large ovarian cysts. A Cook Ob/Gyn special cyst aspirator with a 14-gauge aspirating needle was inserted into the abdomen to drain the ovary through a separate 10-mm port; the site of insertion depends on the location of the ovary. After the cyst was decompressed, the 10-mm incision was enlarged to 3 cm, and either extracorporal oophorectomy or cystectomy was performed. RESULTS: No complications occurred. Average blood loss was less than 15 cc; average carbon dioxide insufflation time was less than 20 minutes. Average operating time was 40 minutes, which was significantly less than traditional laparoscopic oophorectomy. The patients were discharged in less than 23 hours. Patient A had a 500-cc dermoid cyst, and subsequently had a normal vaginal delivery at term. Patient B had a 1600-cc cyst removed. She had a cesarian delivery due to cephalopelvic disproportion. Pathological analysis of the specimen identified the mass as a dermoid cyst and serous cystadenoma. Patient C had a 3200-cc ovarian cyst. Currently, she is in her 24th week of gestation. Patient D had a 700-cc simple ovarian cyst removed at her 16th week of gestation. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic extracorporal oophorectomy requires significantly less CO2 insufflation time and a shorter operation time, hence, decreasing the adverse effects on the fetus. The enlarged second trimester uterus made traditional laparoscopy more complicated. Performing the procedure extracorporally decreased the possibility of operative complications.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
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10/113. Intra-axial dermoid/epidermoid tumors of the brainstem in children.

    BACKGROUND: Epidermoid and dermoid cysts are rare intracranial space-occupying lesions, which account for about 1% of all intracranial tumors; they are even rarer in the pediatric age group. Among the various locations, that inside the brain stem is quite exceptional (only 12 cases reported to date in the literature). We report two additional cases occurring in children, underlining their clinical characteristics, the difficulties faced in the diagnostic work-up, and the surgical treatment adopted (which consisted of removal of the cyst contents and partial resection of the cyst membrane, because of its adherence to the surrounding nervous and vascular structures). methods: We report two cases of intraaxial dermoid/epidermoid cysts observed within the last 5 years. Both patients complained of cervico-nuchal pain, with a remittent/intermittent character in one of them; this patient also exhibited transient 6th and 7th cranial nerve deficit. One lesion was approached through the floor of the fourth ventricle, the second one through the ventrolateral aspect of the brainstem. RESULTS: Subtotal tumor resection was achieved in both cases. Both patients had a smooth postoperative course without permanent neurological deficits. In the first patient residual tumor remains stable on follow-up MRI. In the second one, early tumor regrowth necessitated a second operation, after which the residual tumor has remained stable. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our experience we suggest that a cautious surgical approach ("conservative" resection) to these lesions is the best choice. In fact, attempts at radical removal carry unacceptably high morbidity and mortality rates.
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