Cases reported "Diabetes Complications"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/20. mucormycosis of the trachea: an unusual cause of acute upper airway obstruction.

    mucormycosis (phycomycosis) has been reported to involve most organ systems in man. We report a young insulin-dependent diabetic who presented with acute upper airway obstruction because of isolated mucormycosis of the trachea. A combination of amphotericin b and surgical resection of the lower two thirds of the larynx and five tracheal rings with primary reanastomosis has resulted in a cure with no evidence of recurrence after nine months of follow-up. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of isolated tracheal mucormycosis and/or acute upper airway obstruction due to mucormycosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/20. Cephalic phycomycosis: a report of eight cases.

    Phycomycosis is the preferred terminology to define a fungal disease which may be devastating and fatal. It is caused by a nonseptate hyphae, class phycomycetes and genus (rhizopus, Mucor, absidia). Phycomycosis in man is usually associated with debilitating diseases such as: diabetes mellitus, leukemia and immunosuppressive conditions. The cephalic phycomycosis has two forms: 1. rhino-orbital cerebral which may be fatal, and 2. rhino-paranasal sinuses form which usually has a benign clinical course. From 1943 to 1967, only 45 cases of the cephalic form were described with a mortality rate of 50%. Since then several series have been added to the literature with improved survival, probably due to the addition of amphotericin b to the therapy. Even with modern therapy, the mortality rate is still about 30%. Modern technology C.T. scan is very helpful to establish orbital and intracranial extension. When intracranial involvement is present, the prognosis is dismal. Our series of 8 patients is reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/20. Invasive primary cutaneous phycomycosis in diabetic leg ulcers.

    Two cases of cutaneous phycomycosis in the form of diabetic leg ulcers were diagnosed by culture and biopsy demonstration of invasive fungal infection. The first patient had an infected vesicular skin lesion. Systemic amphotericin b therapy and repeated debridement were curative. A posttraumatic leg ulcer developed in the second patient in the setting of hyperglycemia and renal insufficiency. Aggressive infection necessitated a curative amputation. Phycomycetes can cause or complicate diabetic leg ulcers and such infections may require biopsy for early recognition and subsequent successful therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/20. Phycomycosis: a cause of bronchial obstruction.

    A patient with diabetes mellitus presented with an obstructing mycetoma in the right bronchus intermedius due to Phycomycetes. review of the literature revealed eight prior case reports of patients with prominent endobronchial disease attributable to phycomycosis. Indolent, obstructing lesions in large bronchi were noted in diabetics. The clinical illness differed from the fulminant fungal pneumonia noted in leukemics but was also lethal because of localized complications such as erosion into the pulmonary artery. The differential diagnosis included mucoid impaction, bronchocentric granulomatosis, and mycotic bronchitis. Surgical resection appears to be the appropriate therapy for well localized bronchial lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/20. mucormycosis of the oral cavity.

    mucormycosis (phycomycosis, zygomycosis) is an acute opportunistic infection caused by a saprophytic fungus found in soil, bread molds, and decaying fruits and vegetables. Numerous predisposing risk factors are associated with mucormycosis, although most cases have been reported in poorly controlled diabetics or in patients with hematologic malignant conditions. This report presents two cases of oral mucormycosis. One case occurred in the maxilla in a patient with well-controlled diabetes. The other involved the mandible and overlying gingiva in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. A review of the literature concerning oral mucormycosis is also presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.223402700586
keywords = phycomycosis, zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/20. Chronic rhinocerebral phycomycosis in association with diabetes.

    Two patients with rhinocerebral phycomycosis associated with diabetes are presented. The chronic nature of the illness in these two cases in emphasized in contrast to the more fulminant course of most previously reported patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to establish the diagnosis as rapidly as possible. Treatment of the underlying disease combined with amphotericin b therapy and radical surgical excision of all infected tissue is important to establish cure of these patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/20. Pulmonary phycomycetoma in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    Phycomycetes are ubiquitous saprophytic fungi sharing with other fungi a propensity for invasion and disease production in immunologically compromised hosts. diabetes mellitus, in particular diabetic ketoacidosis, is a common clinical setting for phycomycosis. A pulmonary phycomycetoma was diagnosed in a diabetic patient from material obtained by bronchial brushing was treated successfully with a combination of surgery and amphotericin b.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = phycomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/20. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis treated with liposomal amphotericin b and surgery.

    We report three cases with rhinocerebral zygomycosis in two diabetic persons and one otherwise healthy person. The diagnosis was established by histopathological appearance and computerized tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. These cases were successfully treated by a combination of surgery and liposomal amphotericin b.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1170135029302
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/20. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis.

    An unusual case of rhinocerebral zygomycosis with its clinical and histopathological features are presented. A good response was observed with oral itraconazole at a dose of 200 mg day-1 for a period of 3 months. To our knowledge, it is the first case report of this infection, involving the maxillary sinus, eye and the brain, from Madras, Tamilnadu, india.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1170135029302
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/20. Chlamydoconidia formation in zygomycosis due to rhizopus species.

    An unusual case of endobronchial zygomycosis, which was caused by rhizopus species and which disseminated to one kidney, occurred in a 36-year-old, diabetic man. The patient recovered fully following lobectomy, nephrectomy, amphotericin b therapy, and control of diabetes mellitus. An interesting histologic finding was the presence of chlamydoconidia formation within the resected lung lesion. To our knowledge, only one previous culture-proven case of zygomycosis has described chlamydoconidia formation in tissue.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3404162035162
keywords = zygomycosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Diabetes Complications'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.