Cases reported "Dirofilariasis"

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1/8. Orbital dirofilariasis.

    dirofilariasis is a parasitic disease of domestic and wild animals that occasionally may present as zoonotic infection in humans. The microfilariae are accidentally transmitted to humans by culex and aedes mosquitoes. Ophthalmic infections with Dirofilaria are well documented all over the world, including America, europe and australia. The infection may be periorbital, subconjunctival or intraocular. In this report a case is described of orbital dirofilariasis that presented as ptosis and lid swelling. Australian ophthalmologists should consider dirofilariasis as part of the differential diagnosis of orbital swelling and inflammation.
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2/8. Intra-oral dirofilaria repens infection: report of seven cases.

    Cutaneous dirofilariasis usually affects animals such as cats and dogs which are known to be the natural host of Dirofilaria. dirofilariasis displays a worldwide distribution. Certain geographic regions account for the majority of reported cases. South-eastern United States, australia and europe have been identified as endemic regions (1, 2). However, new endemic areas are arising with increased awareness in African and Asian regions. Out of about 40 different species of Dirofilaria only a few species are commonly known to infect man, namely Dirofilaria immitus, D. tenices and D. repens. Human infection occurs when a human becomes a blood meal of an infected arthropod vector and on accidental entering of the worm. Rarely this zoonotic infection affects the oral mucosa (3). Man is the dead end of this parasite. Since the human body is an abnormal environment for the parasite, the development of the larvae is inhibited by means of retardation of sexual maturity. Lesions are presented as single non-tender subcutaneous nodules, and most patients are asymptomatic. diagnosis is established by H&E sections prepared from excised nodules. In a majority of the cases, only a single worm either a male or a female could be identified. The worm is usually dead and degenerated with a massive inflammatory cell infiltration. Seven new cases presented as intra-oral nodules with their clinicopathological correlation are discussed.
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3/8. Subtenons infection by dirofilaria repens.

    Zoonotic filariasis caused by dirofilaria repens, a parasite of carnivores occurs mainly in countries surrounding mediterranean region. The infection occurs in and around eye among animal handlers through vector transmission. We are reporting a case of human dirofilariasis affecting subtenons region in a 63 year-old woman from Coimbatore, South India. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical course and management of ocular dirofilariasis.
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4/8. dirofilariasis presenting as a breast lump.

    dirofilariasis is now recognized as a zoonosis. infection of humans occurs when a mosquito that has obtained larvae-containing blood from an infected animal transmits the larvae, after they have developed to the infective stage, to a human. Dirofilarial infections in humans have been reported from around the world. In this paper a case is reported in which subcutaneous dirofilariasis in a human presented as a lump in the breast. The epidemiologic and pathogenetic features of this disease are discussed.
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5/8. Periorbital dirofilariasis.

    A differential diagnosis of inflammatory periocular soft tissue masses includes sarcoidosis, ruptured dermoid cyst, infectious abscess, metastatic neoplastic disease, and idiopathic pseudotumor. The authors present the case of a 42-year-old woman with a periocular inflammatory mass caused by dirofilaria of a nematode classification as Dirofilaria tenuis. The extraction of the worm was curative and the patient has been symptom-free for the ensuing 12 months. This zoonotic infection, spread by mosquito vectors from animal hosts to humans, is rarely encountered in the United States as a cause of periorbital inflammation. A history of migratory swelling and residence in, or travel to, endemic areas (the southeastern united states) should suggest the possibility of Dirofilaria infection.
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6/8. Zoonotic roundworm infections.

    The larval stage of several animal parasites can infect humans and produce severe disease. Visceral and ocular larval migrans caused by the common dog roundworm, toxocara canis, are two well-recognized clinical syndromes. With the wider availability of serodiagnostic tests for toxocaral infection, other syndromes characterized by neuropsychologic deficits, epilepsy, asthma, abdominal distress, and chronic allergy have been described. Treatment with corticosteroids in conjunction with anthelminthic drugs may be life- or sight-saving. Recognition of the risk factors for infection is key to prevention, reinfection, and more serious illness.
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7/8. Extrapulmonary dirofilaria immitis-like infections in the Western Hemisphere.

    One worm recovered from the orbit of a patient in indiana, and two from the peritoneal cavity of another patient in california are described and classified as Dirofilaria. Both patients were elderly men who have lived all their lives in the United States. The main morphologic feature of these three immature worms is the presence of a smooth cuticle devoid of longitudinal ridges, similar to the cuticle of D. immitis. However, because other dirofilariid with similar cuticular characteristics have been found in animals in the Western Hemisphere, and they cannot be conclusively ruled out as the cause of the infection in our patients, a diagnosis of D. immitis-like organism is proposed for these nematodes. The relationship of these worms to other dirofilariid of animals and humans on the American continent is important because of the diagnostic problems these infections posed to practicing pathologists.
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8/8. dirofilariasis, a rare, usually imported dermatosis.

    dirofilariasis is an animal filariasis, exceptionally transmitted to man. The clinical manifestations are usually one or a few subcutaneous nodules which are frequently mistaken for lipomas or epidermic cysts. Inside the nodule may be found a worm, adult but immature. There are no systemic reactions and the only required treatment is surgical excision of the nodules.
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