Cases reported "Discitis"

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11/49. psoas abscess: the spine as a primary source of infection.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report, literature review, discussion. OBJECTIVES: To emphasize the role of the spine as primary source of infection for psoas abscess. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: spine-associated psoas abscesses increase with more frequent invasive procedures of the spine and recurring tuberculosis in industrialized countries. Diagnosis is often delayed by misinterpretation as arthritis, joint infection, or urologic or abdominal disorders. methods: We present six cases of psoas abscesses associated with spinal infections that were treated in our hospital from January to December 2001. Diagnostic and treatment concepts are discussed. RESULTS: Our data emphasize the importance of the spine as primary source of infection and suggest an increase in the incidence of secondary psoas abscess. Treatment includes open surgical drainage and antibiotic therapy. In patients with high operative risk and uniloculated abscess, a CT-guided percutaneous abscess drainage can be sufficient. It is essential to combine abscess drainage with causative treatment of the primary infectious focus. Related to the spine, this includes treatment of spondylodiscitis or implant infection after spinal surgery. Usually, several operations are necessary to eradicate bone and soft-tissue infection and restore spinal stability. Continuous antibiotic therapy over a period of 2-3 weeks after normalization of infectious parameters is recommended. CONCLUSION: The spine as primary source of infection for secondary psoas abscess should always be included in differential diagnosis. Because the prognosis of psoas abscess can be improved by early diagnosis and prompt onset of therapy, it needs to be considered in patients with infection and back or hip pain or history of spinal surgery.
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12/49. Disseminated infection due to scedosporium apiospermum in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    A 62-year-old man diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia which had developed from myelodysplastic syndrome received cytarabine and idarubicine as an induction therapy. The patient developed pneumonia and bacterial sepsis during profound neutropenia. fever and sepsis improved by using many anti-bacterials and anti-fungals but he became febrile again and complained of severe lumbar pain. 67Ga scintigram showed abnormal uptake in the lumbar vertebra and left sternoclavicular joint, suggesting a diagnosis of discitis and osteomyelitis in the lumbar vertebra and sternoclavicular arthritis. We biopsied the site several times but culture of the biopsy specimen could not isolate any pathogens, and high fever persisted for about 10 months despite administration of various anti-bacterials and anti-fungals. Finally we inserted a catheter into the abscess at the iliopsoas muscle and scedosporium apiospermum was isolated in the bloody pus obtained from the catheter. itraconazole and amphotericin b were restarted, and the high fever and lumbar pain improved rapidly. The findings of S. apiospermum infection in this patient emphasizes the importance of being aware of this pathogen in patients with hematologic malignancy during the neutropenic phase.
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ranking = 0.076923076923077
keywords = abscess
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13/49. Distant skip level discitis and vertebral osteomyelitis after caudal epidural injection: a case report of a rare complication of epidural injections.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report of distant discitis and vertebral osteomyelitis involving skip levels after caudal epidural steroid injection. OBJECTIVES: To report and investigate the occurrence of distant infective discitis and vertebral osteomyelitis involving skip levels after epidural injection. SUMMARY OF THE BACKGROUND DATA: Distant discitis and vertebral osteomyelitis is a serious but rare complication after epidural injection. A case involving skip levels and without the occurrence of epidural abscess formation has apparently not been previously reported in the literature. methods: An elderly woman presenting with clinical, radiologic, and magnetic resonance imaging evidence of spinal canal stenosis involving L3/4 and L4/5 levels and degenerative spondylolisthesis of the L4/5 level was given an epidural injection of steroids and lignocaine via the caudal route. A month later, she presented with worsened low back pain, elevated serum acute phase reactants, and plain radiographic evidence of L4/5 infective discitis. magnetic resonance imaging and microbiologic examination of computed tomographically guided biopsy specimens confirmed infective discitis involving L2/3 and L4/5 intervertebral levels, together with adjacent vertebral osteomyelitis. RESULTS: The patient was successfully treated with antibiotics targeted at pseudomonas aeruginosa, which was isolated in the culture of the biopsy specimens. Follow-up improvements in the clinical condition, serum acute phase reactants levels, radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging were noted. CONCLUSIONS: Distant discitis and vertebral osteomyelitis involving skip levels and without the occurrence of epidural abscess formation is a serious but rare complication after epidural injection.
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ranking = 0.15384615384615
keywords = abscess
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14/49. An unusual cause of vertebral osteomyelitis: Candida species.

    Candida species rarely cause spondylodiscitis. During 3 y, 3 cases of vertebral osteomyelitis due to Candida spp. (candida albicans and candida tropicalis) were diagnosed, 2 of which were associated with a spinal epidural abscess.
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15/49. One case of gram-negative anaerobic spondylodiscitis with prevotella intermedia.

    We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with spondylodiscitis at L1/L2, communicating with paravertebral, intravertebral and bilateral psoas abscesses. Percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided abscess drainage and an intravenous antibiotic therapy with imipenem were performed. After removing the drainage at 2 weeks, the patient was discharged at 4 weeks with normalized blood parameters, normal temperature, and without need for analgesics. The underlying bacterium in the case was a very rare gram-negative anaerobic bacterium: prevotella intermedia.
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ranking = 0.15384615384615
keywords = abscess
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16/49. Abdominal sacral colpopexy mesh erosion resulting in a sinus tract formation and sacral abscess.

    BACKGROUND: Complications associated with the use of synthetic mesh during an abdominal sacral colpopexy procedure include mesh infection and erosion into the vaginal vault and sacral osteomyelitis. CASE: This case report describes the management of an abdominal sacral colpopexy procedure that was complicated by postoperative vaginal mesh erosion, formation of a fistulous tract from the vaginal apex to the sacrum, and development of diskitis, osteomyelitis, and a sacral abscess. CONCLUSION: Treatment of a vaginal mesh erosion complicated by the formation of a sinus tract after abdominal sacral colpopexy should include extensive sinus tract resection in addition to complete mesh removal.
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ranking = 0.38461538461538
keywords = abscess
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17/49. MRI demonstration of cervical spondylodiscitis and distal full-length bilateral paraspinal cold abscesses successfully treated by drug regimen only.

    OBJECTIVE: Cold abscesses, although common in spinal tuberculosis, are usually localized to the level of infection, follow tissue planes, and may extend into the spinal canal at any level. They may cause symptoms resulting from neurovascular compression, hemorrhage, and direct mass effect. DESIGN AND patients: We present an unusual case of cervical tuberculous spondylodiscitis in a 25-year old man with a cold abscesses involving the retropharyngeal, mediastinal, and retroperitoneal areas bilaterally. The abscess tracked from the neck to the psoas muscles bilaterally. Following the diagnosis the patient received 9 months of antituberculous therapy. RESULTS: MRI showed resolution on medical treatment alone. CONCLUSIONS: Even in the presence of massive paravertebral cold abscesses medical treatment alone may well suffice for this common worldwide disorder. MRI is ideal for monitoring regression of massive abscesses in deep anatomical locations.
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ranking = 0.69230769230769
keywords = abscess
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18/49. epidural abscess and discitis complicating instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case of epidural abscess and discitis following instrumented PLIF using a single carbon fiber interbody cage is presented. OBJECTIVE: To describe a previously unreported complication of epidural abscess and discitis following posterior lumbar interbody fusion using a single carbon fiber cage. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Various complications have been reported with PLIF. These include graft migration, pseudarthrosis, implant subsidence, epidural hemorrhage, incidental durotomy, arachnoiditis, transient or permanent neurologic deficits, persistence of pain, and wound infections. There are no reported cases of epidural abscess or refractory discitis associated with PLIF. methods: A 35-year-old infantryman on active duty with chronic low back pain and single-level lumbar disc degeneration underwent instrumented PLIF after reporting no improvement with 3 years of extension-based physical therapy and nonsteroidal pain medications. His back pain was reported improved at 6 weeks after surgery. At 12 weeks after surgery, he presented to the emergency department with intense back pain and fevers. Laboratory data were remarkable for elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (118) and c-reactive protein (38). Initial imaging studies, including a lumbar MRI, did not demonstrate any abnormalities. The patient continued to spike fevers, and a repeat lumbar MRI 1 week later clearly demonstrated the presence of an epidural abscess at the level of the PLIF surgery. The patient was treated with surgical debridement and epidural abscess drainage. The interbody cage was left in place. Surgical cultures identified staphylococcus aureus as the pathogen, and the patient was placed on intravenous vancomycin. During the ensuing 3 weeks, his clinical symptoms worsened and his radiographs demonstrated lucency in the region of his interbody cage. Repeat debridement was performed, and his interbody cage and pedicle screw instrumentation were removed 4 months after initial surgery. RESULTS: The disc space infection resolved following removal of the implants. Radiographs at 6 months after instrumentation removal demonstrated solid bilateral posterolateral arthrodesis. The patient returned to active duty 1 year after his initial surgery, reporting that his back pain was reduced compared with his preoperative level. CONCLUSIONS: There is a paucity of literature on epidural abscess and discitis as complications associated with PLIF. In this case, the infection persisted despite surgical debridement and intravenous antibiotics. The patient ultimately required removal of the interbody implant and posterior instrumentation. The patient developed solid posterolateral arthrodesis despite the presence of deep infection, which led to early implant removal 4 months after the initial surgery. This case underscores the potential importance of concomitant posterolateral fusion, particularly following wide laminectomy and facetectomy required for PLIF.
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ranking = 0.76923076923077
keywords = abscess
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19/49. Nonspecific pyogenic spondylodiscitis: clinical manifestations, surgical treatment, and outcome in 24 patients.

    OBJECT: Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis is of special interest to neurosurgeons because it often results in acute neurological deterioration and requires a combination of adequate surgical and conservative treatment. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the strategy of a primary surgical approach to this disease. methods: A group of 24 patients with the clinical and radiological signs of acute pyogenic spondylodiscitis was prospectively followed from 1998 to 2004. Of these, 20 had underlying diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic alcoholism, and liver cirrhosis. The main causative organism was staphylococcus aureus. Most infections were localized in the thoracic or lumbar spine (10 cases each); 15 infections were associated with epidural abscesses. Because of a delay in diagnosis, 13 patients presented with neurological deficits on admission. patients with a complete or rapidly progressing neurological deficit underwent immediate surgery. In patients with minor or no deficits or in a stable neurological condition, surgery was delayed for 3 to 5 days. This group was treated with immobilization and intravenous antibiotic drugs before surgery. Surgical procedures included ventral, dorsal, and combined approaches in one- or two-stage operations. Antibiotic treatment included the use of broad-spectrum antibiotic drugs delivered intravenously for at least 10 days, followed by orally administered antibiotics for 3 months. Twenty patients were independent on follow-up review, 15 with no or minor handicaps. Severe septicemia and multiorgan failure developed in two patients, and these two died of their disease. Major complications were mainly due to long-term antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical treatment is the modality of choice in patients with acute spinal osteomyelitis. It is especially indicated in patients with progressive or severe neurological deficits and spinal deformity. In experienced hands, surgery is safe and offers the advantages of spinal cord decompression, immediate mobilization, and correction of spinal deformity. The decision whether an anterior or posterior approach should be used must be made on an individual basis.
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ranking = 0.076923076923077
keywords = abscess
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20/49. Tophaceous gout of the lumbar spine mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis and epidural abscess: MR imaging findings.

    We report a case of surgically proven tophaceous gout of the lumbar spine at the L5-S1 level that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis and epidural abscess on magnetic resonance (MR) images in a 65-year-old woman. The spinal tophi were hypointense on T1-weighted images; focally and strongly hyperintense on T2-weighted images; and heterogeneously, marginally enhancing on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. The aim of this report is to emphasize the importance of considering this disease entity in the differential diagnosis of an epidural mass in a patient with chronic back pain.
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ranking = 0.38461538461538
keywords = abscess
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