Cases reported "Disease Progression"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/39. Focal, steroid responsive myositis causing dropped head syndrome.

    The dropped head syndrome, which occurs in a variety of neuromuscular disorders, is usually not due to an inflammatory process and generally either self-limited or nonresponsive to therapy. We present an 80-year-old woman who developed progressive neck weakness over a few months due to a focal and restricted inflammatory process involving the neck extensor muscles. She responded dramatically to treatment with immunosuppressive therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = myositis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/39. Mobility challenges and solutions for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive soft tissue ossification. Although signs may be present at birth, the first appearance of ectopic bone typically occurs in early childhood. The primary target is the axial musculature. Eventually ectopic bone also occurs in ligaments, fascia, aponeurosis, tendons, and joint capsules of the appendicular skeleton with a proximal to distal predilection. As the disease advances, mobility becomes restricted, and affected individuals are typically limited to bed or chair by their early 30s. This report describes a 30-year-old woman with advanced FOP. She had a fused spine and a fixed pelvis, with hips and knees locked in flexion and feet in plantarflexion. Her upper limb mobility was similarly restricted. She was not able to stand upright or sit independently. The modification of a commercially available power wheelchair that allowed the patient to maintain her employment as a preschool teacher and custom shoes are described. Creative physiatric intervention is essential to liberate human potential for people with FOP.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2059.1998089162
keywords = fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, ossificans progressiva, fibrodysplasia ossificans, progressiva, fibrodysplasia, ossificans
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/39. Case report: paraarticular soft-tissue osteoma of the hip.

    A case of paraarticular soft-tissue osteoma of the hip is presented. The patient is a 30-year-old white male with a two year history of progressive left hip pain. Plain film and cross-sectional imaging in conjunction with pathologic correlation are used to make the diagnosis. The lesion lacks the typical zoning pattern of myositis ossificans, shows no direct communication with native bone, and is extraarticular in location as opposed to synovial osteochondromatosis. Soft tissue osteomas most commonly occur around the knee, the foot, and the ankle. Soft tissue osteomas are rare tumors and this case is unusual in that it occurs around the hip.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 9.5800639917056
keywords = ossificans, myositis ossificans, myositis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/39. pyomyositis of the leg with early neurologic compromise.

    pyomyositis, although uncommon, is being reported with greater frequency in temperate climates. The presentation is similar to a number of infectious processes, and when associated with a traumatic event, the clinical picture may be confused with that of a musculoskeletal injury. This, coupled with an unfamiliarity of the disease, may result in a delay in diagnosis. Early antibiotic therapy may obviate surgery. Progression to the suppurative stage requires surgical drainage along with antibiotics. CT guided drainage may be accomplished in certain cases. In immunocompromised patients, progression to the septicemic stage is associated with high morbidity and mortality.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.25
keywords = myositis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/39. Microvascular endothelial abnormality in skeletal muscle from a patient with gastric cancer without dermatomyositis.

    We found a microvascular endothelial abnormality in a biopsy specimen from the gastrocnemius muscle of a patient with gastric cancer, who had severe myalgia and angialgia in the calf region with the symptoms of thrombophlebitis. There were no definite findings of inflammatory myopathy in histochemical and immunohistochemical studies. Electron microscopic examination revealed the accumulation of abnormal mitochondria in the subsarcolemmal area, and a fair number of degenerating capillaries. Immunohistochemical analysis of procoagulant or anticoagulant factors revealed marked reduction of thrombomodulin (TM) expression on small vessels and capillaries. Although a reduction of TM on small vessels has been observed around perifascicular atrophic fibers in patients with dermatomyositis, histochemical findings of the present patient showed no perifascicular atrophy or severely degenerating fibers. These pathological findings in the patient may be related to a malignant neoplasm and may be one of the causes of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which is the main complication of malignant neoplasms. Further studies are necessary to determine whether the reduction of TM on the small vessels and capillaries in skeletal muscle is a predictor of some severe condition such as DIC or a rare pathological finding in some special condition such as scirrhous carcinoma with thrombophlebitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.25
keywords = myositis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/39. pemphigus vulgaris in association with silicosis.

    We report on a sixty-seven year old miner with pemphigus vulgaris characterised clinically by a three month history of relapsing oral lesions and blisters/erosions on the trunk, axillae and extremities, histologically by suprabasal cleavage due to acantholysis, immunologically by the epidermal intercellular net-like pattern due to deposits of IgG- and IgM-antibodies and complement c3 in the direct immunofluorescence as well as by serum antibodies to desmoglein 3 (130 KD) and plakoglobin (85 KD) by immunoblotting analysis. silicosis has already been known for 6 years. In addition, antinuclear antibodies, anti-ssDNA-antibodies and anti-topoisomerase antibodies were found. Clinical improvement and clearing of skin symptoms could be achieved by systemic steroids in combination with cyclophosphamide. However, the patient died of sepsis deriving from recalcitrant pneumonia. Although the association of silicosis with various autoimmune diseases such as systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and dermatomyositis has been reported many times, our patient is, to the best of our knowledge, the second case with features of the two diseases: pemphigus vulgaris and silicosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = myositis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/39. Amyopathic dermatomyositis and pulmonary fibrosis.

    'Amyotrophic dermatomyositis' (ADM) is used to describe a small subgroup of patients with the typical skin rash associated with dermatomyositis but without muscle involvement. lung involvement in ADM is rare. We report on the management of a patient with ADM associated with pulmonary fibrosis at presentation, and her response to corticosteroid treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = myositis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/39. Rapidly progressive polymyositis with elevated antiacetylcholine receptor antibody activity.

    We report a 51-year-old woman with polymyositis accompanied by a high titer of antiacetylcholine receptor antibody. The patient presented with weakness of grip strength followed by rapidly progressive dyspnea, which required mechanical ventilation. She was treated with a glucocorticoid and came off the respirator one week later. Antiacetylcholine receptor antibody activity was elevated in the acute phase and decreased during recovery, although other signs of myasthenia gravis were negative. This patient suggested that in cases of rapidly progressive bulbar palsy and limb muscle weakness, it is necessary to include polymyositis associated with elevated antiacetylcholine receptor antibody activity in the differential diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = myositis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/39. Myositis, microvesicular hepatitis, and progression to cirrhosis from troglitazone added to simvastatin.

    A 68-year-old woman, with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and prior long-term simvastatin therapy, self-resumed troglitazone after running out of metformin. She developed an acute severe hepatitis with microvesicular steatosis and mysositis. There was subsequent resolution of the myositis but progression of the hepatitis to symptomatic cirrhosis over a period of 12 weeks. Both troglitazone and simvastatin are metabolized by cytochrome P-450 3A4. Troglitazone typically induces metabolism of drugs metabolized by this cytochrome so that simple simvastatin toxicity seems less likely to have been involved. The association with myositis, the severity of the hepatitis with progression to cirrhosis, and the presence of microvesicular steatosis suggests altered mitochondrial metabolism, which has been described with each agent, as the underlying pathogenic mechanism. Although troglitazone (Rezulin) has been withdrawn from the market, other similar agents are available for therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Increased awareness of a potential interaction between these two classes of drugs is warranted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = myositis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/39. Unusual presentations in myositis ossificans progressiva. A case report.

    myositis ossificans progressiva is a rare connective tissue disorder. We present here a case of myositis ossificans progressiva with some unusual presentations and associated congenital skeletal anomalies that are reported very infrequently in the literature. The case report highlights the importance of early diagnosis in a case of rapidly progressive myositis ossificans progressiva.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1165.4980054754
keywords = ossificans progressiva, progressiva, ossificans, myositis ossificans, myositis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Disease Progression'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.