Cases reported "Disease Progression"

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1/81. Progression of cardiomyopathy and neuropathy after liver transplantation in a patient with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy caused by tyrosine-77 transthyretin variant.

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy is an inherited form of amyloidosis associated with a mutant form of a protein called transthyretin. The methionine-30 variant is the most frequent mutation observed. This disorder is caused by deposition of this protein as amyloid in several organs, such as the heart, kidneys, and peripheral nervous system. The disease is always progressive and fatal, and patients die 7 to 10 years after the onset of symptoms. liver transplantation is at present the only choice for these patients because it provides improvement of symptoms and/or stops progression of the disease in most patients. We report the case of a patient who showed clear progression of cardiomyopathy and neuropathy after liver transplantation.
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2/81. Low serum C3, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia: unusual features of henoch-schonlein purpura.

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) affects predominantly the skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract and kidney. Although the pathogenesis is probably of immune origin and complement activation is thought to play a role, laboratory findings including the serum level of the complement components are usually normal. We present a patient with a severe form of HSP nephritis who had unusual laboratory findings of a low level of C3, mild leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. These findings may further support the importance of complement activation in the pathogenesis of HSP.
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3/81. Acquired cystic kidney disease: rapid progression from small to enlarged kidneys simulating adult polycystic kidney disease.

    A 57-year-old man on chronic hemodialysis presented marked bilateral renal enlargement due to acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD). He had been on hemodialysis for less than 3 years only (14 months prior to receiving a functional renal transplant which lasted 8 years, followed by 18 additional months of dialysis), before the diagnosis of ACKD was made following an episode of flank pain with gross hematuria. The marked changes in kidney appearance during this 11-year period were documented by serial ultrasound examination showing the kidneys to be of near-normal size before the start of dialysis (> or =10 cm in 1986), then shrunken and contracted 5 years later while having a functioning renal transplant (<5 cm in 1991), and markedly enlarged reaching the size of adult polycystic kidney disease after returning to dialysis (>13 cm in 1997). Since the risk of ACKD increases with duration of dialysis, we sought additional predisposing factors in this unusual case and found that 2 years after renal transplantation, the patient was diagnosed with breast cancer for which he was treated with surgical excision and tamoxifen. Based on ultrasound evidence that the tamoxifen treatment preceeded the appearance of the renal cystic changes, we wonder whether this drug may have played a role in the rapid development of ACKD.
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ranking = 341.49341792497
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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4/81. Urinary basic fibroblast growth factor: a noninvasive marker of progressive cystic renal disease in a child.

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a hereditary condition with an estimated incidence of 1 in 20,000 live births. Various growth factors have been implicated in the causation of this disease. We describe a child with ARPKD whose levels of urinary basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were markedly elevated. The concentrations of bFGF increased further following right nephrectomy, in response to the compensatory growth of the remaining kidney. We hypothesize that measurement of urinary bFGF may be useful as a noninvasive marker to assess progression of cystic renal development.
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ranking = 34.549341792497
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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5/81. Ruptured sinus of a Valsalva aneurysm associated with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease in an elderly patient: report of a case.

    We report herein the case of a 71-year-old woman with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), who was referred to our hospital for investigation of facial edema. echocardiography demonstrated a large aneurysm arising from the non-coronary sinus of valsalva, with a left to right shunt and jets of blood passing from the aneurysm toward the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve. Surgical treatment was successfully carried out by resecting the aneurysmal wall and performing a patch closure of the orifice. It is well known that ADPKD predisposes patients to cardiovascular disease, and this case report serves to demonstrate that when a patient with ADPKD presents with progressive heart failure, the possibility of a ruptured sinus of a Valsalva aneurysm must be considered.
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ranking = 167.74670896248
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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6/81. role of lipids in the progression of renal disease in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease marked by immune-complex mediated lesions in small blood vessels of various organs, especially the kidneys, although other factors may also be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. This article focuses on the role of lipids in the progression of glomerular, vascular and tubulo-interstitial lesions in two patients with lupus nephritis associated with pronounced hyper- and dyslipidemia. The pathogenesis of progressive glomerulosclerosis in both patients appears to be multifactorial. In addition to immune complex mediated lupus glomerulonephritis, progressively active in the first patient, severe nephrotic-range persistent proteinuria, arterial hypertension associated with hyperfiltration and hyperperfusion injuries and, to a minor extent, hyper- and dyslipidemia were observed. Immunological and non-immunological factors were shown to contribute to the development of tubulo-interstitial lesions. In both patients, in addition to local immune deposits, prominent tubulo-interstitial lipid deposits were probably causally related to both hyperlipidemia and the increased permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier. Tubular lesions were highlighted by intracytoplasmic lipid droplets as well as small cleft-like spaces found to be impacted in the tubular lumina. They were seen to penetrate tubular epithelial cells and eventually lodge in the interstitium, surrounded by mononuclear cell infiltrates and foam cells. In both patients, hypertensive angiopathy and extraglomerular vascular immune deposits were demonstrated. In addition, in the second patient, arteriolar and small arterial hyaline was found at the age of 28 years to be full of lipids and calcium precipitates, suggesting a peripheral atherosclerosis-like process which never occurs as a natural age-related condition. In conclusion, all parts of the nephron may be involved in the pathogenetic process causally related or influenced by hyper- or dyslipidemia. Associated either with endothelial cell injury and consequent insudation of lipids in the vascular walls, glomerular filtration barrier injury with hyperfiltration, or tubulo-interstitial lipid deposition, the mechanism of tissue damage by lipids in all parts of the nephron shares similarities with the pathogenesis of systemic atherosclerosis.
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7/81. lymphomatoid granulomatosis in a 4-year-old boy.

    lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a necrotizing angiocentric and angiodestructive infiltrative process involving primarily the lung, skin, central nervous system, and kidney. The incidence is highest in middle-aged men and is rare in children. We report a case of lymphomatoid granulomatosis involving both skin and lung in a 4-year-old boy. The disease progressed to peripheral T-cell lymphoma, which was unusual in light of recent evidence suggesting a B-cell origin in the majority of cases.
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keywords = kidney
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8/81. Unbalanced 4;6 translocation and progressive renal disease.

    Two sibs are described with an unbalanced 4;6 translocation resulting in partial trisomy 6p and monosomy for distal 4p. growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial appearance are present. The facial anomalies include high prominent forehead, blepharoptosis, blepharophimosis, high nasal bridge, bulbous nose, long philtrum, small mouth with thin lips, and low-set ears. Both children have small kidneys and have had proteinuria since early childhood. The older boy developed progressive renal disease including hypertension and renal failure necessitating renal transplantation at age 18 years. Renal biopsy of the younger girl also indicates significant renal involvement. Progressive renal disease is likely an important part of the trisomy 6p phenotype.
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keywords = kidney
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9/81. Wegener's granulomatosis presenting as mediastinal soft tissue mass invading the tracheal wall.

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a clinicopathologic entity of unknown cause characterised by a necrotising granulomatous vasculitis affecting multiple organs, especially the upper and lower respiratory tracts, lung and kidney. The lung is the most frequently, and sometimes the only involved organ. Single or multiple nodules, with or without cavitation, are the most common pulmonary manifestations in WG, but mediastinal involvement is atypical. The sole tracheal involvement is rare and hilar and mediastinal involvement has been thought not to be part of the clinical feature. We experienced a rare case of WG presenting as paratracheal mediastinal lesions with tracheal wall invasion, which responded dramatically to corticosteroid treatment. We present this case with a review of the literature.
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10/81. Hepatic amyloidosis with light chain deposition disease. A rare association.

    Monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition diseases are due to pathological protein deposition in various tissues and organs. Protein deposits may be found in a single tissue or systemically and the organs most frequently involved are kidney, heart, peripheral nerves and the liver. Depending on the pattern of the deposits and the type of immunoglobulin, these diseases are distinguished as primary amyloidosis, light chain deposition disease. Differential diagnosis is made in tissue specimens: microscopically by the identification of positive congo red staining of the deposits, by immunohistochemical demonstration of proteins reacting with light chain (lambda or kappa) antisera or by recognition of fibrillar structures on electron microscopy. We report an unusual case of light chain deposition disease associated with amyloidosis, where hepatomegaly was the presenting manifestation and liver failure the cause of death, without any kidney involvement.
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keywords = kidney
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