Cases reported "Dislocations"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/161. An unusual ulnar nerve injury associated with dislocation of the elbow.

    A case of anterior traumatic transportation of the ulnar nerve presenting as a nerve palsy after dislocation of the elbow is described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/161. The prevention of irreversible lung changes following reversible phrenic nerve paralysis.

    phrenic nerve paralysis frequently follows operations on the neck such as resection of a cervical or first rib. It all too often passes unrecognised or is incorrectly treated, leading to permanent lung damage which may be severe enough as to result in a functional pneumonectomy. This is particularly unfortunate since the phrenic nerve paralysis is usually temporary. Three case histories are described of reversible paralysis of the phrenic nerve in which, due to prompt diagnosis, the ensuing lung changes were either prevented or immediatley treated. Intermittent assisted respiration with a Monaghan respirator was used to provide nebulised inhalations of mesna several times a day. The method is applicable via a tracheostomy, an endotracheal tube or a simple mouthpiece. The latter is illustrated. The therapy is not hindered by immobilisation of the head and neck and the level of consciousness of the patients is of no importance. Many chest x-rays demonstrate the rapid clearing of the lungs achieved. All three patients were discharged with perfectly normal lungs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/161. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy following placement of the compass elbow hinge for acute instability: a case report.

    We describe a case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy that developed after application of a hinged elbow external fixation device. Our hypothesis that forearm pronation during ulnar half pin insertion may have been causative is supported by anatomic findings noted during subsequent cadaveric dissection. Based on our observations we recommend that the ulnar half pins required with this device be inserted with the forearm in supination.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/161. Phase II therapy for a chronic pain patient: a clinical report.

    One of the roadblocks to success in treating temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) patients is an accurate diagnosis. The terms "TMJ" or "TMD" are not specific enough to provide definitive treatment. Initially the disorder must be classified as a muscular or an internal derangement problem. Once accomplished, the further diagnostic breakdown of the problem will prepare the patient and the doctor for the scope of treatment necessary and the prognosis. This lack of a specific diagnosis can lead to inappropriate treatment and inadequate communication among clinical dentists, academia and patients. Our patients and the profession will continue to suffer until a single diagnostic system is universally agreed upon and utilized.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.035540144184644
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/161. Correction of knee deformity in patients with ellis-van creveld syndrome.

    Six knees in three patients with ellis-van creveld syndrome were treated with lateral soft tissue release and corrective osteotomy of the tibia at 10 years of age on average. The main feature was valgus deformity with lateral dislocation of the patella. All patellae were reduced. The valgus deformity improved from 35 degrees (range, 48 degrees-20 degrees) to 17 degrees (range, 35 degrees-5 degrees) of the femorotibial angle (FTA) on average, although the FTA in five of six knees was < 5 degrees after surgery. There was one recurrent case and one transient peroneal nerve palsy. The reason for undercorrection was a depression of the lateral tibial plateau. The deformity of the articular surface is the most important problem in correcting the valgus deformity of the knee in this syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/161. Tardy ulnar tunnel syndrome caused by Galeazzi fracture-dislocation: a neuropathy with a new pathomechanism.

    We present a case of late-onset ulnar tunnel syndrome following a Colles fracture. The nerve palsy was caused by a vascular branch that stretched over the ulnar head, compressing the nerve and generating friction against the ulnar head when the forearm was rotated. This is the first report of such a pathomechanism.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/161. A rare case of irreducible knee dislocation in a seventy-three-year-old male.

    Knee dislocations usually can be treated by closed reduction, although a small number must be reduced surgically. A seventy-three-year-old patient sustained a knee dislocation while skiing, with entrapment of the medial capsule and the medial retinaculum in the femoral notch. There was no evidence of any vascular or nerve injury. Open reduction with transverse dissection of the medial retinaculum led to reduction. We achieved an excellent result by external fixation and early aggressive rehabilitation without repair of the avulsed cruciate ligaments.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/161. Anterior interosseous nerve palsy associated with Galeazzi fracture.

    Galeazzi fracture is more common in adults than in children. Associated neurologic deficits are rare and easily missed at the first clinical examination. The authors describe a case of anterior interosseous nerve palsy after closed Galeazzi fracture. Conservative treatment resulted in complete return of normal nerve function, suggesting that this is a neurapraxia type of injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/161. Transarticular fixation with the capacity for motion in fracture dislocations of the elbow.

    Post-traumatic stiffness of the elbow joint is a frequent result of immobilisation leading to severe disability in the use of the upper extremity. Recognition of the tendency to stiffness leads to the assumption that the strong self-healing forces of the capsule and ligament apparatus converts the initial instability of the joint after ligament disrupture, into a high-grade undirected stability following immobilisation. Directed stability as it is produced by the natural ligament apparatus of the joint on the other hand produces a guided movement of the joint in one direction. These theoretical considerations lead to the idea that the self-healing forces of the ligament apparatus under continuous guided movement of the joint will result in a stable and movable joint to allow healing of the compromised soft tissue envelope and moreover to maintain free soft tissue access without compromising the stability. For this a unilateral fixator with motion capacity was developed. The joint bridging application approaches the humerus and ulna from the lateral side. The proximal pin group is inserted into the proximal region of the humerus respecting the radial nerve. The distal pin group is implanted from the dorsal side into the middle third of the ulna. The fixator has a hinge joint. The design of the fixator clamps, bars and the hinge joint allows simple alignment with the rotational axis of the elbow. Pro- and supination of the forearm is unhindered. Flexion and extension can be permitted according to the soft tissue situation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/161. median nerve compression associated with displaced Salter-Harris type II distal radial epiphyseal fracture.

    Three children with grossly displaced Salter-Harris Type II fractures of the distal radial epiphysis underwent immediate manipulation under anaesthetic (MUA) because of rapidly developing median nerve compression. In each case nerve function was quickly restored with no late neurological sequelae. We believe that in children who sustain this injury with signs of median nerve compression, immediate MUA without carpal tunnel release is acceptable initial management. Late exploration of the median nerve can be considered should a neurological deficit persist.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Dislocations'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.