Cases reported "Diverticulitis"

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11/37. Surgical management of cecal diverticulitis: is diverticulectomy enough?

    INTRODUCTION: Cecal diverticulitis is a rare condition in the western population. The optimal management of this condition is still controversial, ranging from conservative antibiotic treatment to aggressive resection. We present our experience of the surgical management of eight cases of cecal diverticulitis over a 25-year period. patients AND methods: The mean age of the patients was 54.2 years. Five patients underwent diverticulectomy, 2 patients underwent ileocecal resection, and 1 patient underwent suture of the perforated diverticulum. RESULTS: The postoperative course of all patients was uneventful. At long-term follow-up (mean 14.6 years, range 1-25 years) none of the patients who underwent diverticulectomy, mentioned any symptom or complication. CONCLUSION: We conclude that diverticulectomy, if technically feasible, could be considered as adequate therapy for cecal diverticulitis. Aggressive resection should be considered in cases of extensive inflammatory changes.
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12/37. blindness in the intensive care unit: possible role for vasopressors?

    blindness caused by ischemic optic neuropathy in the hospital setting occurs perioperatively and in critically ill patients, but its etiology remains ill defined. We describe four critically ill patients who developed blindness within 1 mo of one another. Three cases occurred outside of the operative arena. Potential risk factors for the development of ischemic optic neuropathy, such as use of vasopressors, venous congestion, and hypotension, are described.
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13/37. Perforated duodenal diverticulitis: a report of three cases.

    BACKGROUND: Duodenal diverticuli are present in up to 22% of the population. However, perforation of a duodenal diverticulum with spillage of enteric contents into the retroperitoneum is rare. methods: We report three cases of perforated duodenal diverticulitis. RESULTS: Clinical presentations varied widely from patients with acute abdominal findings and generalized sepsis to a patient with mild symptoms of abdominal discomfort. CT scanning was the imaging modality used to make an accurate diagnosis. Treatment approaches for the most stable patient included nonoperative management with antibiotics, bowel rest and parenteral alimentation, while the less stable patients underwent definitive surgery with complete diversion of gastric contents and biliary flow from the affected area of duodenum. CONCLUSIONS: This report highlights the salient issues in the presentation, diagnosis and modern management of patients with this potentially catastrophic disease.
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14/37. Recurrent complicated colon diverticulitis in renal transplanted patient.

    colon perforation due to diverticulitis is a life-threatening complication in the postoperative course of kidney transplantation. In the immunocompromised patient a diagnosis of diverticulitis is difficult to make. We report a 53-year-old woman being kidney transplanted 14 years ago with known diverticulosis. She was admitted with acute severe pain in the lower left abdomen. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan indicated a diagnosis of intestinal abscess in the small pelvis. laparotomy showed a covered sigma perforation with abscess located in the small pelvis (Hinchey-I). Because of the immunocompromised situation of the patient we performed a Hartmann procedure. Her postoperative course was uneventful. In a 6-month interval the intestinal continuity restoration was performed. Twelve days after discharge the patient was readmitted with reduced renal function and increased infection parameters. During physical examination the abdomen was tender. The patient complained of abdominal pain in the left upper abdomen and additional pain in the left shoulder. An antibiotic therapy using ciprofloxacin was already initiated owing to a urinary tract infection. An abdominal CT scan was performed and indicated an intestinal abscess in the left upper abdomen. laparotomy showed an abscess involving transverse colon, distal jejunum, and proximal ileum (Hinchey-II). Segmental resection of the left colonic flexure, proximal jejunum, and ileum was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 8th postoperative day. The present casuistry emphasizes that the immunocompromised patient can undergo diverticulitis twice, and that primary anastomosis is a feasible option for patients with localized peritonitis due to complicated diverticulitis.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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15/37. Synchronous laparoscopic sigmoid resection and hysterectomy with transvaginal specimen removal.

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic sigmoid resection for recurrent or complicated diverticulitis and laparoscopically assisted hysterectomy for leiomyomas of the uterus are common procedures. A synchronous combination of these two interventions with the advantage of using the vaginal stump as a route for removal of the specimen has not previously been described. MATERIALS AND methods: We used a transvaginal extraction of the uterus and the colorectal segment, followed by a totally intra-abdominal circular stapler anastomosis. The procedure is performed via four trocar incisions, obviating the need for a laparotomy. RESULTS: Two women suffering from diverticulitis and symptomatic uterus myomatomas were treated by combined laparoscopic sigmoid resection and laparoscopically assisted transvaginal hysterectomy. Both patients had an uneventful intraoperative course. DISCUSSION: This new approach, combining two operations, is feasible and leads to almost perfect cosmetic results, cumulatively shorter hospitalization, and good patient satisfaction. Cooperation with a gynecologist as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic surgery is essential.
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16/37. Pharyngeal diverticulum as a sequela of anterior cervical fusion.

    A rarely diagnosed etiology of dysphagia is a pharyngeal diverticula occurring after anterior cervical fusion. Here we review 2 cases where patients developed pharyngeal diverticula following anterior cervical fusion. The first patient was a 28-year-old female who presented with regurgitation following C5 through C6 cervical fusion. She was diagnosed with a pharyngeal diverticulum and underwent open repair, but began to experience symptoms again a few months later. A barium swallow showed a recurrent pharyngeal diverticulum. Endoscopic repair was attempted; however, because of the thick scar band between the diverticulum and the esophagus, the operation had to be converted to an open repair with cricopharyngeal myotomy. The second case involved a 63-year-old male who presented with dysphagia and regurgitation 6 months after anterior cervical fusion. Esophagram demonstrated a small diverticulum at the right lateral border of the upper esophagus. Open repair of the diverticulum with cricopharyngeal myotomy was successfully performed. Pharyngeal diverticula after anterior cevical fusion have only been reported in 2 prior cases in the literature. Here we describe 2 additional cases at our institution, both requiring open repair. Radiographic studies demonstrate the diverticulum at the site of scarring from the cervical fusion. Because of the thick scar band and the atypical location of these diverticula, endoscopic repair with stapping (as done for Zenker's diverticula) may not be feasible. These cases highlight the importance of considering a diverticulum in the differential of posoperative patients presenting to the otolaryngologists with complaints of dysphagia following cevical spine surgery.
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17/37. Sonographic findings of acute appendiceal diverticulitis.

    Preoperative images of acute appendiceal diverticulitis are rarely reported because of the difficulty of distinguishing appendiceal diverticulitis from other ileocecal diseases like acute appendicitis or cecal diverticulitis. We report a case of preoperatively diagnosed acute appendiceal diverticulitis. A 30-year-old female with a presumptive diagnosis of acute appendicitis from history and physical examination was admitted to our hospital. Ultrasound sonography showed inflamed appendiceal diverticula and inflammatory changes of the surrounding tissue. The swollen appendix was detected but its findings were slightly different from those of typical acute appendicitis in the following points. One difference was the thickened wall of the appendix, the other difference was the presence of air in the appendix. The patient underwent appendectomy and the pathological specimen revealed inflammatory changes of diverticula within the appendix.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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18/37. diverticulitis of the jejunum: clinical and radiological features.

    This article describes three cases of jejunal diverticulitis in elderly women, who had presented with pain and tenderness in the periumbilical region or the left side of the abdomen, low-grade fever, anemia, and weight loss. The findings were initially attributed to possible inflammatory or neoplastic lesions of the colon. However, gastrointestinal barium studies and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen proved crucial in establishing the preoperative diagnosis of jejunal diverticulitis and its associated abscess in the adjacent mesentery or abdominal wall. The clinical and radiological manifestations of this uncommon entity are herein presented along with a brief review of the pertinent literature.
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19/37. Perforating duodenal diverticulitis.

    Two cases of perforating duodenal diverticulitis are reported, one with enterolith formation, and the other with sonographic evidence of retroperitoneal emphysema. The possible complications of duodenal diverticula, as well as the difficulties encountered in preoperative diagnosis, are discussed.
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20/37. CT findings of perforated duodenal diverticulitis.

    The diagnosis of duodenal diverticulitis is rarely made preoperatively by upper gastrointestinal series or plain abdominal films. We describe a case of perforated duodenal diverticulitis diagnosed by CT.
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ranking = 1
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