Cases reported "Diverticulum, Esophageal"

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1/86. Intramural diverticulosis of the esophagus.

    A description is given of the etiology and pathology of intramural esophageal diverticulosis as so far discussed in the literature. In view of the course and the clinical findings in two young patients in whom this diagnosis was established, it is suggested that intramural diverticulosis develops as a result of a devolopmental disorder in the autonomic nervous system.
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2/86. Epiphrenic diverticulum composed of airway components attributed to a bronchopulmonary-foregut malformation: report of a case.

    Bronchopulmonary-foregut malformation (BPFM), defined originally as pulmonary sequestration with or without communication to the esophagus, has been acknowledged to include congenital foregut diverticula. We present herein the case of a 43-year-old woman with a 9-year history of dysphagia, in whom a barium meal examination demonstrated a 2.5-cm epiphrenic diverticulum and several fistulae. A laparotomy was performed and the lower esophagus without communication to the lung was pulled down and resected, followed by an esophagogastrostomy carried out with fundopexy. Since her operation, the patient has been free of symptoms. Histologically, the diverticulum was observed to be lined by stratified squamous cells, but its shape was formed by mural cartilage, smooth muscle cells, and three ciliated-cell cysts. The dysphagia was considered to have been derived from the kinked esophagus created by the rigid diverticulum, being the possible developmental arrest of a supernumerary lung bud. These findings indicate that this case may involve BPFM in the broad sense. Although several cases of bronchogenic cysts located beneath or across the diaphragm have been reported as a subgroup of BPFM, congenital epiphrenic diverticula has rarely been described.
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3/86. adenocarcinoma in a mid-esophageal diverticulum.

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing compared with squamous cell carcinoma. The most common location of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is the distal one third. Cancer developing in an esophageal diverticulum is uncommon, but tumors of squamous cell origin in esophageal diverticula have been reported previously. We describe an adenocarcinoma in a midesophageal diverticulum and review malignancies occurring in esophageal diverticula.
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4/86. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis associated with esophageal perforation.

    We report a rare case of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis with lower esophageal stricture which perforated into the peritoneal cavity after the patient vomited. A 61-year-old man was admitted with severe chest and epigastric pain after dysphagia and vomiting. Under a diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal perforation, laparotomy was performed. The anterior wall of the abdominal esophagus was found to have ruptured, and proximal gastrectomy with abdominal esophagectomy was performed. Histological examination revealed esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis with esophageal stricture distal to the site of rupture, and postoperative endoscopy showed diffuse pseudodiverticulosis in the remaining esophagus. The patient is free of symptoms 5 years after the surgery. This case suggests that careful treatment may be indicated in patients with esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis with stricture and elevated intraluminal pressure, to minimize the possibility of severe complications such as esophageal perforation.
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5/86. Laparoscopic resection of an epiphrenic diverticulum of the esophagus.

    Diverticulectomy of epiphrenic diverticula of the esophagus is conventionally performed via left thoracotomy. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with an epiphrenic diverticulum that was resected using a transperitoneal laparoscopic technique.
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6/86. sarcoidosis and giant midesophageal diverticulum.

    traction diverticula of the midesophagus result from granulomatous inflammation of mediastinal lymph nodes. tuberculosis and histoplasmosis are known etiologies of this condition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a traction diverticulum caused by sarcoidosis.
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7/86. Laparoscopic approach for esophageal achalasia with epiphrenic diverticulum.

    We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with a 10-year history of dysphagia, regurgitation, cough, and 10-kg weight loss caused by an epiphrenic diverticulum associated with esophageal achalasia managed with a laparoscopic approach. A preoperative barium swallow showed a dilated sigmoid esophagus with a 6-cm epiphrenic diverticulum. Esophageal manometry confirmed the absence of peristalsis in the esophageal body. We performed a laparoscopic diverticulectomy and a 7-cm distal esophageal myotomy with a Dor fundoplication. The postoperative course was uneventful. On the third postoperative day a barium swallow showed no leak, and the patient started oral intake. She was discharged home 5 days after the operation free of symptoms and tolerating a soft diet. Sixteen months after surgery, she was asymptomatic and had gained 8 kg. A barium swallow showed a normal-size esophagus with regular emptying. We reaffirm the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of the laparoscopic diverticulectomy and distal myotomy with Dor fundoplication to manage epiphrenic diverticula resulting from esophageal achalasia.
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8/86. Laparoscopic management of pseudoachalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and benign esophageal stromal tumor.

    A case report is presented of a 59-year-old woman who was suspected of having a paraesophageal hernia, but at operation was found to have an epiphrenic diverticulum of the esophagus, a benign stromal tumor of the esophagus, and pseudoachalasia. The stromal tumor was resected laparoscopically together with a laparoscopic Heller's myotomy and partial posterior fundoplication.
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9/86. Video-assisted resection of pulsative midesophagus diverticula.

    BACKGROUND: Pulsative diverticula located in the midesophagus occur rarely. Surgical treatment is indicated for symptomatic diverticula. This study evaluated a new minimally invasive method of treatment. methods: Three women, ages 69 to 73 years, underwent resections of diverticula via a thoracoscopic access. No major complications were observed. Preoperative symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation, aspiration, loss of weight, and retrosternal pain were not reported at follow-up assessment 3 to 60 months after surgery. The patients were highly satisfied with the functional results. CONCLUSIONS: According to our results, minimally invasive treatment of midesophagus diverticula by thoracoscopic resections may be performed with excellent outcome.
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10/86. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis: review of symptoms including upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    BACKGROUND: Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIP) is a rare condition manifested by multiple, flask-shaped outpouchings in the wall of the esophagus, which represent dilated excretory ducts of esophageal mucous glands. STUDY: Five patients with EIP were evaluated with regard to symptoms and concomitant diseases, as well as endoscopic, radiologic, and manometric findings. RESULTS: Primary clinical symptoms reported by the five patients (three men and two women; age range, 59-72 years) were increasing dysphagia ( n = 3), upper gastrointestinal bleeding ( n = 1), and no symptoms ( n = 1). Concomitant diseases were chronic alcoholism ( n = 3), diabetes mellitus ( n = 1), and reflux esophagitis ( n = 1). Primary diagnosis was made endoscopically in all cases. Endoscopic findings other than pseudodiverticula were esophageal webs ( n = 2) and proximal esophageal stenoses ( n = 4). The typical radiologic findings were detectable in two patients, pathologic manometric findings were seen in only one patient. The authors treated the concomitant diseases and performed endoscopic dilatations of esophageal stenoses. One case with initial bleeding from an associated web is described in detail. According to our knowledge, this is the first publication of a case of EIP-associated bleeding. CONCLUSION: Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis is a differential diagnosis in cases of dysphagia and/or esophageal strictures if no other causes are found. The authors think that endoscopy is the method of choice for establishing the diagnosis.
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