Cases reported "Dizziness"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/24. Remote medical consultation for vestibular disorders: technological solutions and case report.

    Complaints of vertigo and imbalance are common presentations to primary care physicians, yet there are few specialists who diagnose and treat these problems as a significant part of their practices. We demonstrated the feasibility of remote consultation for a patient presenting with vertigo using a two-way digital video and audio network. It was possible to take an appropriate history, examine the patient, and provide a diagnosis and treatment. The patient had a common problem that causes dizziness: benign positional vertigo (BPV). An essential component of the examination was the use of a head-mounted display with embedded cameras. The cameras allowed viewing of the patient's eye movements, which were diagnostic.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/24. Cases from the aerospace medicine Residents' teaching File: acute onset of dizziness in a USAF aviator.

    An air Force F-15 pilot develops the sudden onset of incapacitating dizziness with nausea and vomiting not associated with flight. Presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and aeromedical issues surrounding the symptom complex of acute onset vertigo is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/24. dizziness and headache: a common association in children and adolescents.

    vertigo has long been recognized by the clinician as a frequent accompanying symptom of the adult migraine syndrome. This association has not been so readily identified in the pediatric population, and, as a consequence, children undergo unnecessary evaluations. We reviewed the charts of all children and adolescents referred for vestibular function testing to the Balance Center at the Barrow Neurological Institute between July 1994 and July 2000 (N = 31). Items analyzed included age, gender, symptoms that prompted the referral, test outcomes, family medical history, and final diagnosis. The most common justification for vestibular testing referral was the combination of dizziness and headache. Other less common reasons were "passing out" episodes, poor balance, and blurred vision. Normal test results were obtained from 70% of patients (n = 22). The most common abnormal test outcome was unilateral vestibular dysfunction (n = 5). Bilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction was present in three patients. One patient had central vestibular dysfunction. The final diagnoses were vestibular migraine (n = 11), benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood (n = 6), anxiety attacks (n = 3), Meniere's disease (n = 2), idiopathic sudden-onset sensorineural hearing loss (n = 1), vertigo not otherwise specified (n = 1), familial vertigo/ataxia syndrome (n = 1), and malingering (n = 1); in five patients, no definitive diagnosis was established. The stereotypical patient with vestibular migraine was a teenage female with repeated episodes of headache and dizziness, a past history of carsickness, a family history of migraine, and a normal neurologic examination. patients who fit this profile are likely to have migrainous vertigo. Consequently, a trial of prophylactic migraine medication should be considered for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. brain imaging and other tests are appropriate for patients whose symptoms deviate from this profile.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/24. Vestibular migraine: objective diagnostic criteria.

    classification of migraine or vertigo based only on clinical symptoms is rather difficult, especially in the postacute stage. The use of diagnostic instrumentation greatly aids clinicians in offereing objective measures of patient physiology. In migraine and vertigo, the "gold standard" objective measure has not been fully defined thereby hindering a criteria for vestibular migraine. This study proposes the use of two seperate modalities; infrared videonystagraphy for vertigo and electric pain thresholds for migraine to quantify patient complaints. While these instruments offer to document patient pathophsyiology, simple clinical procedures are presented to provoke the dizzyness of vertigo and the allodynia of migraine in patients being evaluted allowing clinicians larger diagnostic and therapeutic options
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/24. Migraine-associated dizziness.

    We reviewed the clinical histories, examinations and results of quantitative vestibular testing in 91 patients with migraine-associated dizziness. nausea and vomiting, hypersensitivity to motion and postural instability accompanied the dizziness. In the majority of patients, the temporal profile of the dizziness was more typical of the headache phase of migraine than of the aura phase. Nineteen patients (20.9%) had unilateral hypoexcitability to caloric stimulation, which represents a modestly increased risk of damage to the peripheral vestibular apparatus. We propose two separate pathophysiologic mechanisms for the production of dizziness with migraine: Short-duration vertiginous attacks lasting minutes to 2 hours and temporally associated with headache are due to the same mechanism as other aura phenomena (spreading wave of depression and/or transient vasospasm). Longer-duration attacks of vertigo and motion sickness lasting days, with or without headache, result from the release of neuroactive peptides into peripheral and central vestibular structures, causing an increased baseline firing of primary afferent neurons and increased sensitivity to motion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/24. aspartame and dizziness: preliminary results of a prospective, nonblinded, prevalence and attempted cross-over study.

    aspartame is a low-calorie food sweetener recently approved by the FDA for general human consumption. One of us (AJG) treated a patient whose symptoms of episodic vertigo and continuous unsteadiness resolved upon ceasing aspartame intake. A literature review revealed that although dizziness has been associated with aspartame intake, no systematic study of the problem exists. As an initial attempt to ascertain the prevalence of aspartame-related dizziness in an otolaryngologic clinic, we elected to study prospectively all patients entering with the complaint of vertigo by means of a standardized questionnaire. Those patients determined to consume aspartame were further studied in a nonblinded manner to see if aspartame intake could be correlated to symptomatology. A cross-over limb was also attempted, but no patient would participate. This presentation details the case history of the propositus patient and the preliminary results of the currently ongoing prospective study.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/24. vertigo secondary to isolated pica insufficiency: successful treatment with balloon angioplasty.

    BACKGROUND: The posterior inferior cerebellar arteries (pica) arise from the intracranial segments of the vertebral artery (VA). We report a case where a nondominant isolated vertebral artery, which terminated in pica, was stenotic. This resulted in brainstem-lower cerebellar ischemia, corrected with balloon angioplasty. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 62-year-old male presented primarily with transient vertigo, syncope, and dizziness and was diagnosed with transient ischemic attack. Angiography of the left vertebral artery (VA) demonstrated a small-caliber vessel terminating in pica with a 90% stenosis at the C6 level. angioplasty of the left VA was performed with excellent resolution of the stenosis. CONCLUSIONS: This case illustrates cerebellar insufficiency in a unique case where the pica was isolated, supplied by a small- caliber VA. Correction of the stenosis improved the patient's symptomatology and prevented an inferior brainstem-cerebellar infarction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/24. Presentation of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome to a dizziness unit.

    An abnormally enlarged vestibular aqueduct has been associated with sensorineural hearing loss in children. Vestibular complaints, in this patient population, have not been characterized. Several patients have presented to the dizziness unit at Sunnybrook with vestibular related complaints. These patients all had sensorineural hearing loss noted in childhood. All provided recollections of periods of imbalance and vertigo. High resolution CT scan documented the presence of bilateral enlarged vestibular aqueducts. The Large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) will be discussed with reference to the pathophysiology of the vestibular complaints.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/24. Perilymphatic fistula in cabin attendants: an incapacitating consequence of flying with common cold.

    A perilymphatic fistula (PLF) is an abnormal communication between the inner ear and the middle ear that leaks perilymph. PLF is considered rare, but is known to occur during childbirth, straining, weightlifting, head trauma, and diving with middle ear equalizing problems. It has also, anecdotally, been described in connection with flying. The symptoms are uncharacteristic vertigo and, in some cases, hearing impairment and tinnitus. This study describes four cases of PLF during a period of 6 mo in a major Scandinavian airline company employing approximately 3000 cabin attendants (CAs). None of the cases were diagnosed at the primary health care level. All were referred to the aviation Medical Center for investigation. The PLF diagnosis was based on the case history, Platform pressure Test (a fistula test), and other vestibular tests. Only one CA has been able to return to flying duties. The article emphasizes the risk of flying with poor middle ear equalization and the necessity of reminding crews and airline companies to "never fly with a common cold".
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/24. Cervical vertigo and dizziness after whiplash injury.

    Whiplash injury is not only limited to neck injury but also brainstem injury that does not involve direct damage to the neck or head. The symptoms of whiplash injury are polymorphous, with the most common complaints being cervical pain, headache and scapulodynia. vertigo and dizziness are also reported in 25-50% of the cases. In otoneurologic studies, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is used for the evaluation of vertebrobasilar hemodynamics in patients who complain of dizziness and vertigo. It is reported that vertebrobasilar artery insufficiency (VBI) leads to brainstem and cerebellar ischemia and infarction following cervical manipulation. Here we examined the correlation between vertigo or dizziness and the right and left side difference in vertebral arteries after whiplash injury using MRA. We studied 20 patients who complained of neck pain with vertigo or dizziness after whiplash injury and 13 healthy volunteers as a control. In the control group, abnormal MRA findings in the vertebral arteries such as occlusion, stenosis or slow blood flow were seen in 77% of the cases. In the patient group, abnormal MRA findings were seen in 60%. The side difference in blood flow was 3.5 /-2.5 cm/s in the control group and 6.1 /-3.0 cm/s in the patient group. Our findings suggest that some subjects with persistent vertigo or dizziness after whiplash injury are more likely to have VBI on MRA. VBI might be an important background factor to evoke cervical vertigo or dizziness after whiplash injury. The side difference between the two vertebral arteries could cause a circulation disorder in the vertebrobasilar system after whiplash injury. However, the VBI on MRA itself was also seen in the control group, and thus it is not clear whether it is due to whiplash injury in the patient group.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = vertigo
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Dizziness'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.