Cases reported "Dog Diseases"

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1/10. Molecular identification and epidemiological tracing of pasteurella multocida meningitis in a baby.

    We report a case of pasteurella multocida meningitis in a 1-month-old baby exposed to close contact with two dogs and a cat but without any known history of injury by these animals. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the isolate from the baby allowed identification at the subspecies level and pointed to the cat as a possible source of infection. molecular typing of Pasteurella isolates from the animals, from the baby, and from unrelated animals clearly confirmed that the cat harbored the same P. multocida subsp. septica strain on its tonsils as the one isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of the baby. This case stresses the necessity of informing susceptible hosts at risk of contracting zoonotic agents about some basic hygiene rules when keeping pets. In addition, this study illustrates the usefulness of molecular methods for identification and epidemiological tracing of Pasteurella isolates.
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2/10. Canine salmonellosis: A review and report of dog to child transmission of salmonella enteritidis.

    dogs have been shown to harbor 53 salmonellae serotypes. Multiple simultaneous infections with 2 to 4 serotypes have been observed. The prevalence of canine salmonellosis may be a high as 27 per cent. salmonella typhimurium and S. anatum are the most common etiologic agents. dogs commonly experience a sub-clinical course of salmonellosis. Some investigators state that the dog may serve as a source of human infections. A few reports in the literature have documented this fact. The transmissions of S. enteritidis from dog to child is described in this article.
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3/10. 'Battered pets': munchausen syndrome by proxy (factitious illness by proxy).

    Nine cases of suspected munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP), involving pets as proxies, were identified among 448 cases of non-accidental injury to small animals. These cases, recorded by a random sample of small animal practitioners in the UK, demonstrated several combinations of features, including attention-seeking behaviour by the owner, real and apparently factitious clinical signs, deliberate injury, markedly abnormal biochemical profiles, serial incidents, interference with surgical sites, recovery after separation from the owner, and 'veterinarian-shopping' by the owner. All of these features are consistent with those identified in the well documented MSBP in which children are the victims. Furthermore, one of the cases involved serial attempts at poisoning other animals and a child.
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4/10. First isolation of mycobacterium microti (Llama-type) from a dog.

    We report the first isolation of mycobacterium microti from a dog with lesions of acute peritonitis. The isolate was demonstrated to be M. microti of Llama-Type by spoligotyping. Epidemiological implications of the isolation of this possibly zoonotic agent from a dog are discussed.
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5/10. tinea faciei caused by microsporum canis in a newborn.

    A case of tinea faciei caused by microsporum canis in a 14-day-old infant is reported. The incubation period was seen to be 1 week. This was a familial infection which also affected the infant's grandmother and their pet cat and dog. Topical treatment with clotrimazole controlled the infection in the baby. A review of 14 cases (including our own) of dermatophytosis in newborn infants reported in the Japanese literature showed that newborn infants might be infected by several of these agents.
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6/10. Active cutaneous leishmaniasis in brazil, induced by leishmania donovani chagasi.

    L.d. chagasi was isolated from active cutaneous leishmaniasis in both human and canine infections in an endemic area in Rio de Janeiro, brazil. Both isolates were identified by molecular and immunological characterization of the parasite using three different methods: electrophoretic mobility of isoenzymes; restriction endonuclease fragment analysis of kDNA and serodeme analysis using monoclonal antibodies. This seems to be the first well documented case in the New World of a "viscerotropic" Leishmania inducing a case of cutaneous leishmaniasis. This observation emphasizes that the diagnosis of the etiologic agent of human or canine visceral leishmaniasis based solely upon clinical and epidemiological criteria may lead to erroneous conclusions.
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7/10. Recurrent pharyngitis in family of four. Household pet as reservoir of group A streptococci.

    A frustrating clinical problem of recurrent streptococcal pharyngitis affected the clinical health, economic well-being, and social function of a family of four. Numerous attempts using conventional methods of treatment failed to permanently eradicate group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection from this family. Their pet dog was finally discovered to be a carrier of group A streptococci and was treated concurrently with all family members. Subsequently, no group A streptococcal infections recurred. This report illustrates the importance of detailed investigation of the patient's environment and contacts, including nonhuman contacts, in cases of recurrent infection with a streptococcal agent.
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8/10. Canine hypertrophic osteodystrophy, a study of the spontaneous disease in littermates.

    All members of a weimaraner litter had clinical and radiographic signs of hypertrophic osteodystrophy shortly after weaning. Three dogs were necropsied. Radiographic metaphyseal densities, which are used to make a clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic osteodystrophy, were found to result from elongation of the calcified cartilage lattice of the primary spongiosa. Intertrabecular acute inflammation was associated with necrosis, failure to deposit osseous tissue on the calcified-cartilage lattice, and trabecular microfractures. This process led to metaphyseal infraction and separation of the epiphysis. Defective bone formation (osteodystrophy) was considered a secondary process resulting from inflammation of osteochondral complexes, marrow, and periosteum. Enamel hypoplasia also was found to be associated with inflammation of the dental crypt, and abnormal enamel matrix was observed in the developing teeth. The histopathology of the bones and teeth was different from alterations which occur in infantile scurvy or congenital syphilis, although these diseases of man have radiographic similarities to canine hypertrophic osteodystrophy. Because the radiologic lesion is nonspecific, a clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic osteodystrophy is not necessarily diagnostic of a specific disease due to a single etiologic agent. liver levels of ascorbic acid were within the normal range. Although an infectious agent could not be identified, the conditions may have an infectious origin with systemic manifestations.
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9/10. The dog heartworm (dirofilaria immitis) in man. An epidemic pending or in progress?

    Human infection with the dog heartworm (dirofilaria immitis) may lead to focal pulmonary infarction with granuloma formation. The resulting roentgenographic coin lesion may require a diagnostic thoracotomy in consideration of malignancy. Because of sometimes enigmatic histopathological characteristics, this process may not be receiving the recognition it deserves. Furthermore, the dramatic increase of primary (canine) host infections in the united states presages an increase of secondary (human) host infections. Many thoracotomies will be performed for this innocuous process unless the dirofilarial agent can be controlled or the human pulmonary lesion can be reliably identified without operation.
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10/10. Retrovirus-like activity in an immunosuppressed dog: pathological and immunological findings.

    A putative retrovirus was isolated from a dog with a severe, acquired immunodeficiency-like syndrome. The haematological abnormalities and immunological deficiencies included anaemia, leucopenia (lymphopenia and neutropenia), thrombocytopenia, decreased humoral immunity, and ineffective T-cell responses in-vitro. The necropsy findings included generalized lymphoid depletion, severe bone marrow hypoplasia, plasmacytic infiltrates in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, and severe secondary infections. Supernates of peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures from the affected dog contained an agent with manganese-dependent reverse transcriptase (RT) activity that sedimented at a density of 1.122 g/ml. RT activity was also found post-mortem in extracts prepared from the bone marrow, lymph nodes, and small intestine. The lymph nodes and small intestine expressed a 3.8 kb mRNA that was recognized by a bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) pol dna probe by Northern blotting. dna isolated from the lymph nodes and small intestine from the affected dog showed distinct band patterns by Southern analysis, suggesting an exogenous retrovirus. The retrovirus could be propagated in normal canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells or short-term canine lymphocyte cell lines in-vitro, and was cytopathogenic for cells of canine, but not human, origin. These results suggest the existence of a pathogenic canine retrovirus capable of producing disease of the type associated with retroviruses in other species.
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