Cases reported "Duodenitis"

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1/8. Duodenal colonization by geotrichum candidum in a child with transient low serum levels of IgA and IgM.

    Fungal colonization was observed in the duodenal biopsy specimens of a nine-year-old girl who complained of anorexia and epigastric pain. endoscopy revealed gastric redness and geotrichum candidum was identified in the duodenum by histopathology and tissue culture. Immunologic work-up showed low serum levels of IgA and IgM. She was treated with ranitidine and antacids for gastritis. At follow-up, the levels of immunoglobulins had normalized, no fungal elements were detected, and clinical symptoms had disappeared. Duodenal invasion by G. candidum has not been described so far. Duodenal colonization by G. candidum may occur when mucosal immunity is disturbed and may be the source of dissemination in severe immunodeficiency states.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
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2/8. Chronic ischaemic gastritis: an unusual form of splanchnic vascular insufficiency.

    Three cases of erosive gastroduodenitis secondary to chronic splanchnic vascular insufficiency are reported. In all cases, pain failed to respond to conventional therapeutic measures for peptic ulcer disease. A patchy discolouration and erythematous mottling of the gastric mucosa, with scattered shallow aphthous ulcers, was seen on endoscopic examination. angiography showed coeliac axis involvement in all patients, with insufficient mesenteric collateral pathways. Chronic gastritis resolved clinically and endoscopically after revascularization.
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ranking = 5
keywords = gastritis
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3/8. Endoscopic findings in pediatric patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura and gastrointestinal symptoms.

    We report the gastrointestinal endoscopic findings in nine patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Eight patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, which revealed erosive gastritis in one patient, hemorrhagic-erosive duodenitis in four, and both findings in one. The rectum and the sigmoid colon were examined in six patients. Aphthoid ulcers were noted in two. In one of these patients, a rectal ulcer was also noted. Severe inflammatory changes and angiitis were found in the biopsy specimens obtained from the duodenum and the colon. The vascular abnormalities in the gastrointestinal mucosa are similar histologically to those found in the skin in Henoch-Schonlein purpura.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
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4/8. Chronic ischemic gastritis reversed after revascularization operation.

    A patient with severe chronic gastritis and duodenitis that clinically and endoscopically disappeared after an intestinal revascularization procedure is reported. Chronic intestinal ischemia appears to be a cause of gastritis as seen in this patient.
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ranking = 6
keywords = gastritis
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5/8. Ischemic gastritis and duodenitis.

    Erosive gastritis and duodenitis resulting from chronic ischemia were seen at endoscopy in a 69-year-old woman with classical abdominal angina and severe atheromatous disease of all three splanchnic arteries.
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ranking = 5
keywords = gastritis
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6/8. Varioliform gastritis and duodenitis associated with protein-losing gastroenteropathy, treated with omeprazole.

    A 44-year-old female with varioliform gastritis and duodenitis had gastrointestinal protein loss revealed by 111indium chloride scintigraphy. Treatment with omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, for 2 months, followed by famotidine, resulted in clinical improvement with resolution of the gastroduodenal lesions and protein loss. Colonization of the stomach with helicobacter pylori was found before and after the treatment. The results in this patient suggest that omeprazole can be of value for the treatment of varioliform gastritis associated with protein-losing gastroenteropathy. The role of helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of this disease is unclear.
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ranking = 6
keywords = gastritis
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7/8. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis associated with clarithromycin.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a possible case of leukocytoclastic vasculitis associated with clarithromycin therapy. CASE SUMMARY: An 83-year-old white woman was prescribed clarithromycin for pneumonia. Six days after her initial presentation, she developed lesions on her palms. clarithromycin was discontinued at that time. The following day she developed purpuric eccymotic nonblanching lesions that primarily appeared on the lower extremities, buttocks, and abdomen. colonoscopy revealed generalized erythema and edema of the bowel mucosa. gastroscopy revealed duodenitis and gastritis, but no bleeding or ulceration. skin biopsy of the lesions was compatible with leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Renal function was not affected, although hematuria was noted. All symptoms resolved after drug withdrawal and a short course of corticosteroids. DATA SOURCES: Searches were performed on medline, Embase, International Pharmaceutical abstracts, and major adverse drug reaction databases to identify reports and articles discussing clarithromycin- and macrolide-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis. DISCUSSION: Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is one category of drug hypersensitivity reactions characterized by distinctive patterns of perivascular inflammation. The case described here is consistent with the diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and is similar to the other single published case report associated with clarithromycin. CONCLUSIONS: Leukocytoclastic vasculitis induced by clarithromycin is a rare but serious potential adverse effect.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gastritis
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8/8. biopsy specimen appearances of ischaemic gastritis in splanchnic arterial insufficiency.

    A 74 year old man presented with a one month history of epigastric discomfort, anorexia, weight loss, and postprandial vomiting. The diagnosis of ischaemia was made on endoscopic biopsies from the stomach and duodenum. He was too ill for major vascular surgery and died eight days after admission. Postmortem examination confirmed the diagnosis of splanchnic arterial insufficiency caused by atheroma and thrombosis. Ischaemic gastritis is rare but could easily be missed in unrepresentative biopsy specimens. Prompt diagnosis with revascularisation surgery is the only hope for long term survival.
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ranking = 5
keywords = gastritis
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