Cases reported "Ear Neoplasms"

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1/42. KTP laser assisted excision of glomus tympanicum.

    A 39-year-old female with a two-year history of mild hearing loss and discomfort on air flight descent was found to have a pulsatile mass behind an intact tympanic membrane. A suspected diagnosis of glomus tympanicum was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scan imaging. The lesion filled the mesotympanum and hypotympanum but the jugular bony plate was intact, confirming the tympanic site of the lesion. This very vascular tumour was exposed by a tympanomeatal flap and the KTP laser used to shrink and coagulate the tumour progressively with minimal haemorrhage and blood loss. Complete excision of the lesion was achieved without the need for bony removal, and with minimal blood loss. The use of the KTP laser to coagulate this vascular lesion allowed safe removal of the tumour and avoided the need for extended facial recess or hypotympanotomy surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus tympanicum, tympanicum, glomus
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2/42. Recurrent glomus tumor of the pinna: report of a case.

    We describe a rare case of a glomus tumor of the pinna. The lesion produced a brief but sharp pain that occurred spontaneously, intermittently, and upon tactile stimulation. Surgical excision with wide margins was successful. We believe this to be only the third case of a glomus tumor of the auricle that has been reported in the literature.
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ranking = 0.0050700418162548
keywords = glomus
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3/42. Sonographic findings in glomus tympanicum tumor.

    A glomus tympanicum tumor that is associated with a visible retrotympanic mass is the most frequent cause of pulsatile tinnitus. The preoperative diagnostic approach to this lesion includes a meticulous physical examination as well as high-resolution CT, magnetic resonance angiography, and digital angiography, which can also be used for preoperative embolization. We report the use of color transcranial Doppler sonography in the evaluation of glomus tympanicum tumor in a 67-year-old woman with a 3-year history of left tinnitus. An otoscopic examination revealed a reddish pulsatile mass behind an intact tympanic membrane. No lesions were visualized on gray-scale sonography. Contrast-enhanced color transcranial Doppler sonography showed a vascular ovoid mass that measured 2 x 1 x 1 cm; spectral analysis of the lesion revealed arterial flow with a low resistance index. color transcranial Doppler sonography helped define the dimensions and vascular characteristics of the lesion.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = glomus tympanicum, tympanicum, glomus
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4/42. Primary adenocarcinoma of the middle ear.

    Primary adenocarcinoma of the middle ear is rare. It may or may not be associated with chronic suppurative otitis media. After the exclusion of a primary site elsewhere, the tumor should be managed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, especially if tumor excision is incomplete. We report a case in which primary papillary adenocarcinoma developed in the middle ear, possibly due to aberrant ceruminous gland elements. The findings prior to histologic examination were unusual in that they were consistent with a tumor of the glomus tympanicum or glomus jugulare.
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ranking = 0.20084500696938
keywords = glomus tympanicum, tympanicum, glomus
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5/42. Schwannoma of the jugular foramen.

    Two cases of schwannoma limited to the jugular foramen are described. This entity may clinically and radiologically resemble glomus jugulare tumors so closely, that only careful histological examination of an adequate surgical tumor specimen can provide a definitive diagnosis. Since documentation of this form of neurogenic tumor is lacking in the literature, it suggests that the entity is very rare or that such tumors may be erroneously classified as glomus jugulare tumors. The two cases in this study were managed surgically by subtotal removal via a wide transmastoid approach.
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ranking = 0.0016900139387516
keywords = glomus
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6/42. Multiple glomus tumours.

    A patient with multiple, synchronous, non-familial head and neck paragangliomas is reported. There were three primary neoplasms, a glomus tympanicum and glomus vagale on the right side and a glomus tumour of the carotid body on the left. Such a combination has never been reported previously. The reports of all the series with paragangliomas in the literature, as well as the reports of single cases with multiple tumours during the last three decades, are reviewed. Specific problems in diagnosis and management of multiple glomus tumours are discussed.
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ranking = 0.20591504878563
keywords = glomus tympanicum, tympanicum, glomus
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7/42. Middle ear hemangioma: a case report.

    Hemangiomas are common benign vascular tumors, but they have rarely been reported in the middle ear. They can mimic glomus tumor in appearance when encountered as middle ear masses. A case of a right-sided middle ear hemangioma in a 51-year-old woman who suffered from pulsatile tinnitus is presented with a review of the relevant literature.
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ranking = 0.0008450069693758
keywords = glomus
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8/42. Jugulotympanic paraganglioma (glomus tumour) presenting with recurrent epistaxis.

    A case is presented where a left jugulotympanic paraganglioma (JTP) extended to the nasopharynx and the patient presented with recurrent epistaxis. Although initial biopsy of an aural polyp had been suggestive of the diagnosis several years previously, the diagnosis was not confirmed until the patient presented with recurrent epistaxis and severe anaemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported of such a presentation of JTP.
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ranking = 0.0033800278775032
keywords = glomus
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9/42. Glomus tympanicum: a report of two cases.

    Two cases of glomus tympanium tumor of the middle ear stage 'type A' according to Fisch classification, are presented due to their rarity in this part of the world. These tumors were excised by end aural tympanotomy approach and there has been no recurrence in both patients to date.
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ranking = 0.16670609545078
keywords = tympanicum, glomus
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10/42. Tympanic paragangliomas: case reports.

    Glomus tumors, also called paragangliomas, originate from nonchromaffin cells. The tumor is typically vascular and grows from capillary and pre-capillary vessels in-between epithelial cells. It is worth mentioning that the most common symptoms are pulsating tinnitus and hearing loss. Imaging studies (CT and MRI) are necessary for diagnosis. This paper shows five patients seen at the Hospital between 1995 and 2001 presenting glomus tympanicum. women were most commonly affected, and the age ranged from 48 to 60 years (mean age of 50 years). The most common complaints were pulsating tinnitus and hearing loss. All patients were treated surgically.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = glomus tympanicum, tympanicum, glomus
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