Cases reported "Ecthyma, Contagious"

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1/23. Facial orf.

    Orf is an occupational dermatosis caused by a poxvirus that infects sheep or goats. Human transmission typically occurs in people in contact with the infected animals or by handling contaminated animal products such as wool or meat. The infection in humans is classically characterized by a solitary papule on the fingers or hands. Involvement of the face or head has rarely been reported. We report orf in a young woman with multiple nodules on the face.
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2/23. Giant orf on the nose.

    ecthyma contagiosum, or orf, is a viral zoonosis of sheep and goats that can be transmitted to humans. In humans, it generally manifests as a solitary skin lesion, although rarely it can have an unusual course or be accompanied by systemic symptoms or complications. We present a case of giant orf lesion on the nose of a 9-year-old. The lesion grew rapidly and measured 5 cm by 4 cm and was attached to the right ala nasi by a base 2 cm round in diameter. The diagnosis was suggested by clinical and histopathologic appearance and confirmed by electron microscopic visualization of the virus. The lesion resolved spontaneously with minimal scarring and the entire cycle lasted about 3 months.
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3/23. A case of human orf contracted from a deer.

    Orf, or contagious ecthyma, is a rare viral dermatosis caused by a member of the genus parapoxvirus. The typical lesion consists of solitary or multiple papules that progress through a series of stages, terminating in complete resolution. This zoonotic disease is most commonly transmitted to humans from infected sheep or goats. We report a case of human orf, likely contracted from exposure to deer carcasses.
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4/23. Swan-neck deformity and paresthesia following giant orf.

    Orf is a zoonotic infection caused by a parapoxvirus that primarily infects sheep and goats. Human orf infection can take place when abraded skin comes into contact with infected animals. It occurs most commonly on the index finger. The characteristic lesion resembles a tumor and resolves spontaneously, usually without any complications. However, rare complications such as lymphangitis, adenitis, erythema multiforme, erysipelas, papulovesicular eruption, pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, and bullous pemphigoid have been reported. Herein, we report a case of giant orf causing swan-neck deformity and paresthesia. These complications have not been previously reported in the literature.
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5/23. diagnosis of orf virus infection in humans by the polymerase chain reaction.

    The orf virus is the causal agent of contagious ecthyma in goats and sheep. The infection can be transmitted to humans and represents a typical example of occupational zoonosis. In italy, the incidence of human infection remains uncertain because the disease is rarely reported or diagnosed. In this paper, we report a case of human orf virus infection and the laboratory methods of diagnosis. We demonstrated a genomic identity between the conserved and the variable regions of the genome of the viral strains isolated from the human patient and from the infected sheep confirming that there is no specific clone infecting humans rather than animals.
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6/23. orf virus infection in humans--new york, illinois, california, and tennessee, 2004-2005.

    orf virus is a zoonotic parapoxvirus endemic to most countries in the world and is principally associated with small ruminants (e.g., sheep and goats). Human orf infections appear as ulcerative skin lesions after contact with an infected animal or contaminated fomite. This report summarizes the epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of four sporadic cases of human orf infection, emphasizing the temporal association between human lesions and skin trauma or recent flock vaccination with live orf vaccine. This zoonotic infection shares clinical manifestations and exposure risks with other, potentially life-threatening zoonoses (e.g., cutaneous anthrax) and is likely under-recognized because of a lack of clinical suspicion and widely available diagnostics. Barrier precautions and proper hand hygiene are recommended for the prevention of orf virus infection in humans.
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7/23. Two giant orf lesions in a heart/lung transplant patient.

    Orf is an infectious ulcerative stomatitis of sheep and goats. The responsible pathogen, parapoxvirus, may be transmitted to humans. Orf lesions are often atypical in immunocompromised individuals. The present report describes two very large exophytic lesions in a 31-year-old transplant patient receiving oral tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone. Early surgical excision was successful, with no relapse after 14 months.
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8/23. Orf: case report and literature review.

    ecthyma contagiosum, or orf, is an uncommon dermatosis resulting from cutaneous infection with sheep pox virus. It is generally a benign and self-limited condition. Early clinical recognition is paramount to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention or extensive diagnostic workup. diagnosis is usually based on a clinically typical skin lesion, characteristic histology, and a history of sheep exposure. We report the case of an infected sheep farmer and review the literature.
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9/23. Human orf. A diagnostic consideration?

    We saw four unrelated cases of human orf infection over a 3-month period. Each patient had a clear-cut history of contact with sheep and developed a characteristic painful pustular lesion on the hand. There were no significant systemic symptoms. Examination of an aspirate by electron microscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The lesions resolved spontaneously within 6 weeks. Human orf infection occurs in north america, and although seldom reported, it should be considered in the diagnosis of cutaneous lesions in patients who have exposure to animals associated with it.
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10/23. Orf: a case report.

    ecthyma contagiosum (orf), a viral disease endemic to sheep and goats, can be zoonotically transmitted to humans through contact with infected animals. While the disease is common among sheep and goat herders worldwide, it comes to medical attention infrequently since it is generally a mild self-limited illness. We recently treated a healthy 36-year-old female who presented with bullous lesions on her fingers and a diffuse macular rash which had developed after antibiotic therapy for her bullae. She had been caring for her neighbor's goats which had recently been ill with "sore mouth." We discuss this case of orf and review the medical literature on this self-limited illness uncommon to the midwestern united states.
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