Cases reported "Ectromelia"

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1/4. Limb deficiency and prosthetic management. 1. decision making in prosthetic prescription and management.

    This self-directed learning module highlights decision making in prosthetic management in pediatric and adult patients. This chapter reviews classification of congenital limb deficiency and management of congenital pediatric upper-extremity amputees. Differences in management of amputees of various ages from infancy to old age is discussed. Case examples are used to formulate prosthetic prescriptions for transradial limb deficiency as well as knee disarticulation and transtibial level amputations. Common prosthetic gait deviations and anticipated functional levels are evaluated. overall Article Objective: To discuss prosthetic prescription and management in congenital limb deficiency and acquired amputations for patients of various ages.
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ranking = 1
keywords = amputee
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2/4. Stubby prostheses in the rehabilitation of infants and small children with bilateral lower limb deficiencies.

    Stubby prostheses have been used in the habilitation of very small children with bilateral lower limb deficiencies, particularly bilateral above knee limb deficiencies. While we reported on "The Use of Stubbies For the child with Bilateral Lower Limb Deficiencies" in 1973, the literature has very little except in relation to the geriatric amputee. We have continued since 1973 to use stubbies in the bilateral above knee limb deficient child, as well as in the child with an above knee/below knee combination, with great success in establishing early balance, followed within several months by the application of articulated prostheses with equal success in establishing independent walking without the use of crutches or walkers.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = amputee
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3/4. Prosthesis with electric elbow and hand for a three-year-old multiply handicapped child.

    The usefulness of wisely prescribed powered components in the rehabilitation of upper extremity amputees has long been recognized (Schmidl, 1973). Their value is especially evident in the prosthetic rehabilitation of high level adult and child amputees (Heger et al, 1985). In recent years, manufacturers of prosthetic hardware have provided practitioners with a wide selection of either myo-electrically or switch controlled electromechanical components and systems. As a rule, however, most commercially available components are designed to serve the adult amputee and do not lend themselves for use in the prosthetic rehabilitation of children. One current exception is the availability of child-size electric hands. The availability of the world's first child-size electric hand in 1970 at the ontario Crippled Children's Centre later known as the Variety Village 105 hand, gave tremendous impetus to the fitting of younger children with externally powered components and myoelectric control systems. However, this trend served to benefit the young below-elbow patient only (Sorbye et al, 1972). The successful fitting of higher amputation levels in this age group stopped at the elbow level. Existing artificial elbows such as the Variety Village and Hosmer elbow with their necessary powerpacks are simply too bulky and too heavy for pre-school age children. The need for a lightweight compact electric elbow, suitable for 3-8 year old children, still has not been addressed. This single case report illustrates an innovative and successful conversion of a 6-3/4 Otto Bock hand into a small electric elbow. The idea was first proposed by Schmidl (1973).
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = amputee
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4/4. life history model of adaptation to disability: the case of a 'congenital amputee'.

    life histories can be used to describe adaptation over time to disabling conditions and the context and meaning of disabilities. Data from the life history of Diane DeVries, a 33-year old woman born with quadralateral limb deficiencies (upper extremity hemimelia, lower extremity amelia) illustrate a model for eliciting, presenting and interpreting life histories of persons with disabilities. Substantively, the life history of Diane DeVries indicates, at this time, survival within a niche of institutional supports that include marriage, church membership, and government for the disabled. Her life history is also characterized by choices that support independent living in the community and a cognitive orientation toward her own cultural normality.
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ranking = 2
keywords = amputee
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