Cases reported "Edema"

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1/153. Unilateral iliac vein occlusion, caused by bladder enlargement, simulating deep venous thrombosis.

    A variety of conditions cause unilateral leg swelling and thus mimic deep venous thrombosis (DVT). A heretofore-underappreciated condition that may lead to unilateral iliac vein compression, simulating DVT, is massive enlargement of the bladder caused by urinary retention. A case that demonstrates this condition is described. Although this disorder has been reported only three times before, its occurrence should be recognized by clinicians in light of the overall aging of our society. In addition, this case highlights the need for careful and thorough evaluation of patients who have unilateral lower-extremity edema.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis, vein, deep
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2/153. Treatment of protein-losing gastropathy with atropine.

    Protein loss from the gastric mucosa with hypertrophic gastric folds and hypoalbuminemia has been associated with low, normal and elevated gastric acid output. A case of protein-losing gastropathy with slightly elevated gastric acid output is described. Associated findings were hypertrophic gastric folds, hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, lymphadenopathy, edema, ascites and venous thrombosis. Oral administration of atropine resulted in a cessation of gastrointestinal protein loss and correction of hypoalbuminemia.
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ranking = 0.18583996107612
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis
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3/153. Lower limb pitting edema in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    We report two patients with lower limb pitting edema and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who showed immediate response to systemic steroids. In one of the patients, the edema had been present for about 6 months and was the first manifestation of her SLE. In the second patient with a long history of SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome, a thrombosis was suspected, but not confirmed. Only after therapy with steroids did the edema disappear completely. Pitting edema of the lower limb could be a rare manifestation of SLE.
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ranking = 0.14038658005547
keywords = thrombosis
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4/153. Ultrasonographically guided injection of corticosteroids for the treatment of retroseptal capillary hemangiomas in infants.

    PURPOSE: Injection of corticosteroids is a well-documented and successful mode of treatment for periorbital capillary hemangiomas. Because of the greater potential risk involved with retrobulbar injections, no prior study has described this treatment for tumors located behind the orbital septum. Although retroseptal intraorbital capillary hemangiomas comprise only 7% of all adnexal capillary hemangiomas, complications such as optic nerve compression or astigmatism may necessitate treatment. methods: Three patients with deep orbital hemangiomas that caused vision-threatening complications were treated with intralesional injections of triamcinolone and betamethasone. Orbital injection was performed with use of real-time ultrasonographic guidance of the needle. This technique was valuable in providing continuous, accurate, and safe advancement of the needletip in the orbit to avoid the globe and orbital walls. ultrasonography also permitted precise placement of the needle tip within the tumor and visualization of the injected material. RESULTS: Significant improvement was demonstrated in all cases on the basis of both ultrasonographic measurements and regression of clinical manifestations such as astigmatism, chemosis, proptosis, and optic nerve pallor. No complications were noted. CONCLUSION: Intralesional injection of corticosteroids to treat retroseptal and retrobulbar capillary hemangiomas was found to be a safe and effective treatment modality in our patients. Positioning of the injecting needle was guided by ultrasonography.
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ranking = 0.0024474048233093
keywords = deep
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5/153. Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae with perimedullary venous drainage. Anatomical, clinical and therapeutic considerations.

    We report five cases of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) with perimedullary venous drainage. All the patients presented with rapidly progressive myelopathy and three had autonomic disorders. The DAVF were on the tentorium cerebelli (two cases), sigmoid (one), superior petrosal (one), and cavernous sinus (one). Slow venous drainage was directed through dilated perimedullary cervical veins. The transverse sinus was occluded in two cases. MRI, performed in four cases, demonstrated high signal on T2-weighted spin-echo sequences in the medulla oblongata and upper cervical spinal cord consistent with oedema, which signal resolved after complete cure of the DAVF in three cases. Embolisation was performed in all cases. It was followed by clinical deterioration in two cases and in the dramatic improvement in the other three, with complete clinical cure in two. Extensive venous thrombosis may explain the deterioration observed in one case.
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ranking = 0.20664327138082
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis, vein
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6/153. Internal jugular phlebectasia--an unusual cause of neck swelling.

    We describe a 7-year-old child who presented with a soft fluctuant swelling on the neck which became more prominent during the Valsalva manoeuvre. He underwent adeno-tonsillectomy based on a mistaken diagnosis of ballooning of the pharynx secondary to enlarged adenoids and tonsils obstructing the nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal airways. Investigations revealed the swelling to be a markedly dilated internal jugular vein. We discuss the diagnostic features and mode of treatment of this condition so as to avoid unnecessary and dangerous surgical intervention.
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ranking = 0.020803310304699
keywords = vein
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7/153. Pulmonary thrombosis, homocysteinemia, and reperfusion edema in an adolescent.

    Deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and pulmonary thrombosis in situ are rare in childhood and adolescence [1,2]. Unfortunately, these diagnoses may be unsuspected in a pediatric patient with dyspnea and chest pain. This article illustrates the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges that arose from unrecognized chronic thrombotic disease in an adolescent.
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ranking = 0.88334082530376
keywords = thrombosis, vein, vein thrombosis
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8/153. Acute axillosubclavian vein thrombosis (Paget-Schroetter syndrome) detected by Tc-99m MAA during pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy.

    The authors describe a 24-year-old man who reported the sudden onset of dyspnea and swelling of his left upper arm. An area of increased activity in the left axillosubclavian region evident on pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy with Tc-99m MAA suggested Paget-Schroetter syndrome (primary deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity).
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ranking = 0.91391906600506
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis, vein, vein thrombosis, deep
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9/153. Complicated emergent endovascular repair of a life-threatening bilateral internal jugular vein occlusion.

    A 62-year-old woman had painful facial swelling that progressed to extensive periorbital and perioral edema with loss of vision, hearing, and consciousness. Her past surgical history was significant for right radical neck dissection including internal jugular vein (IJV) resection, laryngectomy, partial esophagectomy, tracheoesophageal fistula repair, and tracheostomy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. In addition, the patient had received radiation therapy to the neck. A venogram revealed occlusion of the left IJV. A guidewire from the femoral vein was passed through the occluded segment; however, attempts to introduce an angioplasty balloon failed. A percutaneous basilic vein approach allowed passage of a dilator sheath over a guidewire, thereby enabling Wallstent deployment across the IJV occlusion. A second Wallstent was inserted across a stenosis in the brachiocephalic vein; however, this second stent reoccluded the IJV. Surgical removal of the second Wallstent was required through a segmental claviculectomy and venotomy. Patency was restored in the IJV and the brachiocephalic vein with the return of baseline neurologic function. This case demonstrates a complicated emergent endovascular repair of a life-threatening IJV occlusion that required surgical salvage.
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ranking = 0.18722979274229
keywords = vein
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10/153. Recurrent leg ulcers and arterial thrombosis in a 33-year-old homozygous variant of antithrombin.

    We report here a homozygous variant case of antithrombin (AT) associated with arterial thrombosis and recurrent leg ulcers. The deep vein thrombosis was recognized by the venogram of his pelvic veins. His leg ulcers were scattered around his left ankle and accompanied by lipodermatosclerosis, which was evident in venous insufficiency. The propositus had developed cerebral infarction 12 years prior to his leg ulcers. Coagulation study showed low heparin cofactor activity of his AT with a normal level of immunoreactive AT. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the exon 2 of his AT gene showed Arg47-Cys mutation, leading to the lack of affinity of AT for heparin. The propositus is a homozygote for this abnormality.
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ranking = 1.4481968680121
keywords = deep vein thrombosis, deep vein, thrombosis, vein, vein thrombosis, deep
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