Cases reported "Elephantiasis, Filarial"

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1/12. Lymphatic filariasis in children: adenopathy and its evolution in two young girls.

    Lymphatic filariasis is a widespread infectious disease of children in endemic areas, but little is known about the early lymphatic damage in children and its evolution, either with or without treatment. Two girls (ages 6 and 12 years) from a wuchereria bancrofti endemic region of brazil presented with chronic inguinal adenopathy. Neither had microfilaremia. By ultrasound both were shown to have living adult worms in their enlarged inguinal nodes and had occult local lymphatic damage (lymphangiectasis). One girl spontaneously developed acute adenitis in the affected node prior to any intervention; this adenitis resolved within 10 days and was associated with the progressive disappearance over 45-90 days of all local abnormalities detectable by ultrasound. In the other child, after treatment with a single dose of diethylcarbamazine (DEC), the same clinical picture of transient adenitis and resolving abnormalities (detectable by ultrasound) occurred. These findings demonstrated filariasis as the cause of adenopathy in children, and also both spontaneous and treatment-induced worm-death, with subsequent reversal of lymphatic abnormalities.
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2/12. Lymphatic filariasis of the ovary and mesosalpinx.

    We report 2 cases of filariasis, one in the ovary and the other in the mesosalpinx. In the first case, the patient underwent panhystrectomy and in the second case, right ovarian cystectomy with right salpingectomy were performed under general anaesthesia. Histopathology showed adult filarial worms in the dilated lymphatics of the right ovary, in the first case and in the mesosalpinx, in the second case. Both patients presented with complaints related to gynecological problems and not filariasis. Reports of filariasis in the literature and possible treatments and prevention strategies are also discussed.
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3/12. Bilateral groove sign with penoscrotal elephantiasis.

    lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually transmitted disease of the lymph channels caused by chlamydia trachomatis. Esthiomene, a rare late manifestation of LGV, is a primary infection affecting the lymphatics of scrotum, penis, or vulva. The male genitalia are affected less commonly by esthiomene, but we report a male patient who presented with inguinal syndrome, penoscrotal elephantiasis, along with enlargement of femoral lymph nodes.
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4/12. Acute lymphatic filariasis in an American traveler.

    Acute lymphatic filariasis developed in an American traveling recreationally to asia. The illness was characterized by fatigue, eosinophilia, and lymphedema of the arm and chest wall, but no lymphangitis, lymphadenitis, or pain. Complete resolution occurred over 1-2 years. We discuss this syndrome and describe the use of new diagnostic tests in its diagnosis and management.
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5/12. filariasis in a child from southern turkey: a case report.

    filariasis is a parasitic condition in which the lymphatic system is invaded by filarial nematodes. The initial signs are those of lymphangitis and lymphadenitis. The manifestations include edema in the extremities and elephantiasis due to lymphatic obstruction. filariasis is endemic to most parts of the world, but occurs only sporadically in turkey. This report describes a case of filariasis in a child who presented with fever and extensive lower-extremity edema.
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6/12. North American brugian filariasis: report of nine infections of humans.

    Nine people living in rhode island, new york, pennsylvania, florida, or california acquired autochthonous brugian filariasis. Each patient had an enlarged lymph node containing a single worm or, in one patient, a pair of worms. Most worms were in lymphatic vessels within the node, but two worms were in the substance of the node. Ten worms were studied, seven female and three male. female worms contained paired uteri that occupied most of the body cavity of the worm, and male worms contained a single reproductive tract. No worms were gravid. The diameter of the worms was small, 30 micron to 75 micron. The usual diameter of female worms was 65 micron to 75 micron, and 45 micron to 50 micron for male worms. The morphologic features of these worms, their anatomical location, and their geographic distribution are all characteristic of infection with a North American brugia species.
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7/12. pleural effusion due to lymphatic filariasis.

    A case of pleural effusion is reported. Pleural biopsy showed microfilariae on histopathological examination. Treatment with diethyl carbamazine yielded excellent results. Filarial aetiology should be included in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic pleural effusions, especially in endemic areas.
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8/12. Chronic elephantiasis. A case report.

    The authors presented a rare case study of a patient with chronic elephantiasis involving the lower extremities. The patient had contracted lymphatic filariasis while serving in the armed forces during world war ii. The patient was followed regularly for local wound care by the veterans Affairs podiatry department. However, he died from congestive heart failure and pneumonia in May of 1993.
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9/12. Bancroftian lymphadenopathy: absence of eosinophils in tissues despite peripheral blood hypereosinophilia.

    We studied the association of eosinophils with wuchereria bancrofti parasites in two children with biopsy-proven filarial lymphadenopathy and peripheral blood hypereosinophilia. In both cases, intact adult worms were present in lymph nodes but no inflammatory reaction was observed. The most remarkable histological feature in our patients was the absence of eosinophils in tissue sections in spite of persistently high numbers of eosinophils in peripheral blood. In the first case, treatment of intestinal parasites before lymph node excision promptly reduced eosinophil counts to normal levels even though levels of microfilaraemia remained virtually unchanged. In the second patient, hypereosinophilia persisted after lymph node resection but disappeared following curative treatment of intestinal helminths. These observations raise fundamental questions about the causal relationship and the role of eosinophils in lymphatic filariasis.
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10/12. Zoonotic brugia infection in western michigan.

    A case of zoonotic lymphatic filariasis is reported from a resident of michigan. Numerous sections of a small, nongravid female worm, measuring approximately 65 microns in diameter, were identified in histological preparations of an excised inguinal lymph node. Based on its location, small size, thin cuticle, small number of muscle cells, and paired uterine tubes, the worm was identified as a brugia species, undoubtedly of zoonotic origin from the local animal population. The pathological response of the host to the parasite was one of hyperplastic lymph nodes with a focal granulomatous reaction. This is the first such case to be reported from michigan and further expands the geographical range of states in which zoonotic brugia infection have been reported.
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