Cases reported "Empty Sella Syndrome"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/160. Spontaneous haemorrhage into an empty sella turcica mimicking pituitary apoplexy.

    We present a case of spontaneous haemorrhage into an empty sella turcica with the features of subclinical pituitary apoplexy. A 66-year-old woman with a previously resected pituitary adenoma presented four months later with progressive headache and visual deterioration. Cranial MRI demonstrated hyperacute blood products in a recurrent pituitary adenoma. Operative findings were of subacute blood in an empty sella turcica. There was no operative or subsequent histological evidence of tumour recurrence. The intrasellar haemorrhage was evacuated via a trans-sphenoidal approach, resulting in a rapid improvement in visual function. Endocrine deficits required thyroxine, corticosteroid and desmopressin supplementation. Haemorrhage into an empty sella turcica has not been previously described and needs to be suspected as a clinical entity in patients presenting with the features of pituitary apoplexy. awareness of this clinical condition will prevent preoperative misdiagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sella, sella turcica, turcica
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/160. empty sella syndrome presenting as galactorrhoea.

    A prolactin secreting tumour is the commonest cause of the amenorrhoea-galactorrhoea syndrome. Galactorrhoea is a rare presentation of an empty sella syndrome. The empty sella syndrome commonly presents with headache and visual impairment and occasionally with endocrine disturbances in hypertensive middle aged women. The authors present a case of hyperprolactinemia resulting in galactorrhoea in a middle aged lady associated with a primary empty sella syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.73227134723562
keywords = sella
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/160. Secondary partial empty sella syndrome in an elite bodybuilder.

    The pituitary gland is a hormone-responsive gland and is known to vary in size depending on the hormonal status of the patient and the multifaceted positive and negative feedback hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Partial empty sella syndrome with an atrophied pituitary gland is seen in primary neuroendocrinopathies such as growth hormone deficiency, primary hypothyroidism, central diabetes insipidus and hypogonadism. Partial empty sella has also been shown to occur in patients with elevations in intracranial pressure. Secondary partial empty sella syndrome with significant pituitary gland atrophy from negative feedback inhibition of long-term exogenous hormonal use has not been previously reported. We are reporting on a case of partial empty sella syndrome occurring in an elite bodybuilder with a long history of exogenous abuse of growth hormone, testosterone and thyroid hormone. The pathophysiological mechanisms of secondary partial empty sella syndrome from exogenous hormone use and the possibility for elevations in intracranial pressure contributing to this syndrome will be discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.94149173216008
keywords = sella
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/160. Chasing hyponatraemia: unusual presentation.

    Two females, in their sixth decade, presented with recurrent episodes of headache, vertigo, vomiting and altered sensorium. Both patients had persistent hyponatraemia as the only clue. Detailed investigations revealed a pituitary aetiology in both. One patient had a pituitary microadenoma while the other had an empty sella syndrome. The diagnosis and management is discussed and the relevant literature reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.10461019246223
keywords = sella
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/160. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea associated with chronic renal failure--case report.

    A 39-year-old woman was admitted with complaints of headache and nasal discharge on the left for 3 months which was later on proved to be cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Neurological examination found no abnormalities except bilateral papilledema. neuroimaging demonstrated enlargement of the lamina cribrosa foramina through which the olfactory nerves pass, as well as empty sella and cerebral cortical atrophy. Bone mineral densitometry showed osteopenia. CSF Ca and blood parathyroid hormone levels were elevated. CSF pressure was 280 mmH2O. Bilateral frontal craniotomy was performed to expose the anterior fossa. Foraminal enlargement at the lamina cribrosa was confirmed, and islands of extra-osseous calcifications on the arachnoid membrane were identified. The base of the anterior fossa was repaired intradurally with fascial graft and fibrin glue on both sides. No CSF leakage was noted at 1-year follow up. Spontaneous CSF leakage probably resulted from enlargement of the foramina at the lamina cribrosa due to Ca mobilization from bones and pseudotumor cerebri not to the extent of hydrocephalus caused by poor CSF absorption at the arachnoid granulations obliterated by extra-osseous calcareous accumulation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.10461019246223
keywords = sella
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/160. Twin pregnancy using recombinant gonadotropins in a woman with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    In women with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are required to induce optimal follicular growth and steroidogenesis. The development of molecular genetic technology has led to the availability of recombinant FSH and LH for the induction of follicular growth and ovulation. We describe a first case of a twin pregnancy in a 36-year-old patient presenting with primary hypogonadotropic amenorrhea and empty sella syndrome and treated with recombinant FSH and LH. This therapy led to the maturation of two follicles, both of which were fertilized. A twin pregnancy ensued and two normal infants were delivered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.10461019246223
keywords = sella
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/160. growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma confined to the sphenoid sinus associated with a normal-sized empty sella.

    We present a case of growth hormone (GH)-secreting ectopic pituitary adenoma confined to the sphenoid sinus associated with a normal-sized empty sella. It has been well known that acromegaly is sometimes associated with an empty sella. However, such a case usually has a macroadenoma and an empty sella that is large. The authors considered the possible mechanisms of the association between a normal-sized empty sella and an ectopic pituitary adenoma in the sphenoid sinus as the following. Primary empty sella existed originally, and the pituitary adenoma developed later. The adenoma extended into the sphenoid sinus because of the pulsatile intracranial cerebrospinal fluid pressure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.94149173216008
keywords = sella
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/160. GAPO syndrome: first patients with partially empty sella.

    GAPO refers to a syndrome of growth retardation (G), alopecia (A), pseudoanodontia (P), and optic atrophy (O). We present for the first time children (two brothers) with GAPO syndrome associated with partially empty sella. We suggest that radiographic evaluation of the sella turcica and endocrinological follow-up are necessary in children with GAPO syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.65096379195941
keywords = sella, sella turcica, turcica
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/160. Primary empty sella syndrome: the role of visual system herniation.

    BACKGROUND: It has been traditionally accepted that ophthalmologic alterations in cases of primary empty sella syndrome are caused by the herniation of the visual system in the pituitary fossa, but this cannot be stated categorically. methods: Two female patients with primary empty sella syndrome and visual field defects were included in this series. The peculiarity of these cases was that in neither of them was there an evident herniation of the visual system. In the absence of other causes that could explain the visual defects, the patients were operated on through a transsphenoidal approach. RESULTS: Both patients showed immediate improvement of their visual deficits without recurrence. Postoperative imaging studies have shown continuance of an adequate elevation of the sellar contents during the 5-year follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: Visual field defects in cases of primary empty sella syndrome may occur even without radiological evidence of herniation of the visual system. The fact that the two patients described in this paper improved after surgery supports other reports that in this syndrome traction on the infundibular stalk may cause some microscopic anatomic alteration in the visual system or in its vascular supply that is not evident on imaging studies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83688153969785
keywords = sella
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/160. Transsphenoidal treatment of empty sella by means of a silastic coil: technical note.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Several methods have been proposed to achieve transsphenoidal arachnoid mobilization and chiasmapexy in symptomatic empty sella (primary or secondary empty sella syndrome). These procedures are often difficult to perform and have not always had satisfactory long-term outcomes because of the difficulty of achieving adequate and long-lasting sellar filling over time. The volume of fat or muscle packing decreases over time as a result of scar retraction. The same problem may occur with intrasellar balloon placement because of deflation of the balloon. TECHNIQUE: We propose extradural packing accomplished through a transsphenoidal approach, using a Silastic (Dow Corning, Auburn, MI) coil, fashioned by means of a ventricular catheter arranged as a spiral. RESULTS: This technique was used in four patients with satisfactory and long-lasting clinical results. It presents several advantages over previous methods: it can be tailored to each patient; Silastic is an inert substance, and therefore scarring, with consequent shrinkage, does not occur; and because the coil is very elastic, it presents few risks of inflammatory complications or of excessive compression of sellar, parasellar, and suprasellar structures. Furthermore, this technique does not require a supplementary skin incision to harvest autologous tissues (fat, muscle, or fascia lata). A skilled neurosurgeon can perform the procedure in a few minutes with more ease and less expense than other techniques. CONCLUSION: The reported technique is a valid alternative to classic transsphenoidal extradural packing.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1507121170845
keywords = sella
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Empty Sella Syndrome'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.