Cases reported "Encephalitis, Tick-Borne"

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1/2. Outbreak of Powassan encephalitis--maine and vermont, 1999-2001.

    Powassan (POW) virus, a North American tickborne flavivirus related to the Eastern Hemisphere's tickborne encephalitis viruses, was first isolated from a patient with encephalitis in 1958. During 1958-1998, 27 human POW encephalitis cases were reported from canada and the northeastern united states. During September 1999-July 2001, four maine and vermont residents with encephalitis were found to be infected with POW virus. These persons were tested for other arbovirus infections found in the northeast after testing for west nile virus (WNV) infection was negative. This report describes these four cases, summarizes the results of ecologic investigations, and discusses a potential association between ticks that infest medium-sized mammals and the risk for human exposure to POW virus. The findings underscore the need for personal protective measures to prevent tick bites and continued encephalitis surveillance.
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2/2. Arboviral disease--united states, 1994.

    arboviruses are mosquitoborne and tickborne agents that persist in nature in complex cycles involving birds and mammals, including humans. Characteristics of arboviral infection include fever, headache, encephalitis, and sometimes death. In 1994, health departments in 20 states reported 100 presumptive or confirmed human cases of arboviral disease to CDC. Of these, 76 were california (CAL) serogroup encephalitis; 20, St. Louis encephalitis (SLE); two, western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE); one, eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE); and one, Powassan encephalitis (POW). This report summarizes information about arboviral disease in the united states during 1994.
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keywords = mammal
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