Cases reported "Encephalitozoonosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/3. encephalitozoon cuniculi microsporidiosis: infection of the brain, heart, kidneys, trachea, adrenal glands, and urinary bladder in a patient with AIDS.

    A female AIDS patient, dying with widely disseminated encephalitozoon cuniculi microsporidiosis, cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease, and pneumocystis carinii infection, is described. Indirect immunofluorescent antibody staining studies and molecular analyses identified the microsporidian as the dog strain of E. cuniculi. autopsy revealed necrotizing microsporidiosis of the adrenal glands and kidneys, with lesser involvement of the brain, heart, trachea, urinary bladder, spleen, and lymph nodes. Cellular targets included macrophages, epithelium, endothelium, and cardiac myocytes. Spore detection was enhanced by Gram-staining, polarization, and fluorescence chitin stains. central nervous system microglial nodules were present and either contained microsporidia, CMV, or no identifiable pathogen. CMV disease was most severe in the central nervous system, trachea, adrenal glands, and colon, whereas the pneumocystis carinii infection was focal in the lungs, lymph nodes, and spleen. This is the first demonstration of Encephalitozoon microsporidiosis of the brain, heart, and adrenal glands in a patient with AIDS. E. cuniculi should be included in the differential diagnosis of disseminated opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = macrophage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/3. A patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and untreated Encephalitozoon (Septata) intestinalis microsporidiosis leading to small bowel perforation. Response to albendazole.

    BACKGROUND: Encephalitozoon (Septata) intestinalis is a common disseminating opportunistic intestinal microsporidian affecting patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. This microsporidian does respond to albendazole therapy. A patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and chronic diarrhea presented to George washington University Hospital in January of 1996. Despite appropriate surgical specimens, no etiology had been found to explain his cholecystitis, cystitis, and enteritis 3 months previously at another hospital. DESIGN: Tissue specimens were analyzed by light microscopy, using hematoxylin-eosin and the Armed Forces Institute of pathology Brown-Brenn microsporidia stain, and by transmission electron microscopy. urine and stool specimens were analyzed by modified chromotrope 2R trichrome and chitin fluorochrome stains and by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: At George washington University Hospital, disseminated E intestinalis was diagnosed from duodenal biopsy, urine, and stool specimens. On the 14th day of oral albendazole therapy, a partial small bowel resection was performed to correct a perforation (air under the diaphragm). There was no enterocyte microsporidian infection at that time, only spores undergoing macrophage digestion. review of previous specimens showed severe E intestinalis cholecystitis, cystitis, and enteritis. albendazole was restarted and, after 2 weeks, the patient had negative stool and urine specimens. CONCLUSIONS: Encephalitozoon intestinalis symptomatically targets many organs, including the urinary bladder. To our knowledge, this is the first tissue-documented case of cystitis. Left untreated with albendazole, small bowel infection can lead to perforation and peritonitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = macrophage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/3. Foamy macrophages in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome cholangiopathy with Encephalitozoon intestinalis.

    acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cholangiopathy is a clinical syndrome characterized by right upper quadrant pain, low-grade fever, and bile duct dilatation or papillary stenosis. Cryptosporidia and cytomegalovirus have been most commonly reported as causes of AIDS cholangiopathy, but recently microsporidia have also been recognized as a causative agent. We here report an additional case of AIDS cholangiopathy with the microsporidian Encephalitozoon (Septata) intestinalis. Because this microsporidial species can disseminate throughout the body and is susceptible to treatment by albendazole, it is important to identify and separate this organism form other causes of AIDS cholangiopathy. A key histologic feature seen in this case, which has not been observed in AIDS cholangiopathy caused by other parasitic organisms, is the presence of numerous foamy macrophages in the lamina propria, which contain the microsporidial organisms, as seen by electron microscopy. The presence of these foamy macrophages may be an important histologic clue to the presence of infection by Encephalitozoon intestinalis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = macrophage
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Encephalitozoonosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.