Cases reported "Encephalomyelitis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/45. Echovirus 7 associated encephalomyelitis.

    BACKGROUND: hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is endemic in malaysia. In 1997, a large outbreak of enterovirus 71 (EV-71) associated HFMD resulted in 41 deaths due to severe left ventricular dysfunction and central nervous system infection with extensive damage to the medulla and pons. The clinical presentation in all these patients were rapid cardio-respiratory decompensation leading to cardiac arrest. Another large outbreak of HFMD with 55 fatal cases and a similar clinical picture was reported in taiwan in 1998. In 2000, an outbreak of HFMD resulted in the deaths of three children who had rapid cardio-respiratory decompensation and one child who survived a central nervous system infection. OBJECTIVES: We set out to study the etiologic agent and mechanism involved in three children who presented to our hospital, two of whom died and one survived a central nervous system infection. STUDY DESIGN: The clinical course of the disease was described. Throat, rectal swab and cerebrospinal fluid samples were subjected to viral isolation and viral isolates were identified by immunofluorescence, micro-neutralisation using human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and reverse transcritpase polymerase chain reaction. magnetic resonance imaging was performed on two of the patients. RESULTS: Echovirus 7 was the sole pathogen isolated from three cases of acute encephalomyelitis, two of which were fatal due to severe left ventricular dysfunction resistant to inotropic support. The survivor had residual bulbar palsy, but is considered to have had a good neurological outcome. CONCLUSION: Echovirus 7 infection associated with encephalomyelitis could be fatal due to indirect involvement of the heart resulting in severe left ventricular dysfunction. In addition one of the children presented with hand, foot, and mouth disease, a syndrome that has not been previously associated with echovirus 7 infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = virus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/45. A local outbreak of paralytic rabies in Surinam children.

    A rapidly fatal encephalomyelitis, which was in most cases characterized by ascending paralysis, developed in seven children of the age of 3 to 10 years in a bushnegro village in the interior of Surinam. rabies virus was recovered from the central nervous system of three autopsied children. Although the source of infection has not been detected, there is an indication that, at least in some cases, the disease has been transmitted by rat-bite rather than by vampire bats. During the same period a few cases of minor febrile illness occurred in the same community. Since virological and serological evidence of a wide-spread distribution of Coxsackie A virus type 4 was obtained, the latter illness may presumably be attributed to this virus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.375
keywords = virus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/45. encephalomyelitis with rigidity complicating human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    A 34-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (hiv-1) presented with axial rigidity, painful spasms, and delayed hemiparesis and dementia. cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed no antiglutamic acid dehydrogenase antibodies but viral genome from Epstein-Barr virus was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Clinical features and possible viral aetiology of progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity are briefly discussed.copyright 2001 movement Disorder Society
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.75
keywords = virus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/45. encephalomyelitis due to human parechovirus type 1.

    OBJECTIVES: The implication of a viral agent in encephalomyelitis has been reported for several years. In the present study we wanted to demonstrate the presence of human parechovirus type 1 (HPEV1) in a patient diagnosed with encephalomyelitis. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical samples (throat and rectal swabs, acute and convalescent sera, cerebrospinal fluid) were collected from a 10-month-old boy diagnosed with encephalomyelitis. The appropriated samples were tested for cytomegalovirus, varicella zona virus, mumps virus and enteroviruses with specific culture, and serological and molecular biological techniques. RESULTS: HPEV1 was isolated from the throat and its genome was additional detectable in the cerebrospinal fluid, throat swab and acute serum. The samples were negative for all other tested viruses. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of HPEV1 infection related to encephalomyelitis. This emphasis that human parechoviruses can be responsible for severe central nervous system infections in children.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.375
keywords = virus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/45. Bilateral anterior optic neuritis in adult measles infection without encephalomyelitis.

    PURPOSE: To describe anterior optic neuritis in adult measles infection.DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: A 31-year-old woman presented with bilateral visual loss 6 days after the onset of maculopapular rash. Complete ophthalmic and neurologic examinations, radiologic studies, and lumbar puncture were performed. RESULTS: Visual acuities were counting fingers in both eyes, with bilateral optic disk hyperemia and swelling noted. neurologic examination was unremarkable, and computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were normal. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was devoid of white cells, although measles immunoglobulin m (IgM) antibodies were detected in both CSF and serum. Intravenous corticosteroids were administered, and clinical findings resolved within 1 month. A fall in serum IgM and a rise in serum IgG titers were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Although rare, optic neuritis in the absence of encephalomyelitis may occur in measles. Whether treatment is effective is unknown.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.8892389834487
keywords = measles
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/45. Relapsing acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with chronic Epstein-Barr virus infection: MRI findings.

    A 25-year-old women had a fever, left cervical lymphadenopathy, neurological symptoms and signs, CSF pleocytosis and persistent high serum antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV); she had a recurrence 1 year later. She was thought to have relapsing acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with chronic EBV infection. MRI revealed abnormalities, mainly in the right basal ganglia and left midbrain. At the time of the recurrence, further abnormalities appeared in the opposite basal ganglia and right cerebral white matter.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.625
keywords = virus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/45. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with hepatitis a virus infection.

    We describe the case of a 30-month-old boy who developed acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) after hepatitis a virus (HAV) infection and ultimately died. As far as we know, this is only the second case of HAV-associated ADEM to be reported in the literature. The child was brought to hospital with fever, lethargy and weakness of 2 days duration. He had developed jaundice, abdominal pain and malaise 2 weeks beforehand and these problems had resolved within 2 days. Neurological examination revealed lethargy, generalised weakness and positive Babinski's signs bilaterally. cerebrospinal fluid examination showed mild lymphocytic pleocytosis, increased protein and elevated anti-HAV IgM and IgG titres. serum HAV IgM and IgG titres were also elevated. Despite aggressive treatment with ceftriaxone, acyclovir and anti-oedema measures, he developed papilloedema and coma within 24 hours of admission. magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed diffuse cerebral oedema and multifocal hyperintensities on T2-weighted images, with most lesions in the white matter of both cerebral hemispheres. The diagnosis of ADEM was established and high-dose steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin were added to the treatment regimen. However, his clinical condition continued to deteriorate and he died on the 20th day in hospital. This case shows that HAV infection can be linked with ADEM. patients with HAV infection should be examined carefully for central nervous system symptoms during follow-up. Likewise, the possibility of HAV infection should be investigated in cases of ADEM.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.625
keywords = virus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/45. Successful treatment of human herpesvirus 6 encephalomyelitis in immunocompetent patient.

    We report a case of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) encephalomyelitis in an immunocompetent patient, which was confirmed by viral amplification from cerebrospinal fluid. Cidofovir was used, followed by ganciclovir, because of an adverse effect to probenecid. The patient recovered. HHV-6 should be recognized as one of the causes of encephalomyelitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.625
keywords = virus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/45. Post-infectious encephalomyelitis associated with St. Louis encephalitis virus infection.

    Neurologic illness associated with acute St. Louis encephalitis, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis virus infection includes acute aseptic meningitis, encephalomyelitis, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome. Few post-infectious immune-mediated neurologic events associated with flaviviral infection have been reported. The authors report on a woman with apparent post-infectious encephalomyelitis associated with recent St. Louis encephalitis virus infection, suggesting that neurologic illness from flaviviruses may also be seen in the post-infectious period following mild clinical illness.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.875
keywords = virus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/45. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis following plasmodium falciparum malaria caused by varicella zoster virus reactivation.

    Neurologic complications in the course of plasmodium falciparum infections are commonly diagnosed as cerebral malaria, but bacterial or viral meningitis may exhibit similar symptoms. One to three weeks after P. falciparum malaria, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) can also mimick the symptoms of cerebral malaria. We describe a 31-year-old woman with life-threatening ADEM five days after successful treatment of P. falciparum malaria. The detection of IgG and IgM antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) against multiple viruses and bacteria reflected a non-specific polyclonal B cell activation and was more confusing than helpful for diagnostic decisions. Varicella zoster virus was identified with a reverse transcriptase multiplex polymerase chain reaction in the initially obtained and frozen CSF. This case and findings from the literature indicate that P. falciparum-associated ADEM might not be immune mediated, but of infectious origin. With unclear cerebral complications during or after P. falciparum malaria, prompt initiation of empirical antiviral and antibacterial treatment in addition to antimalarials may reduce mortality.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.75
keywords = virus
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Encephalomyelitis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.