Cases reported "Encephalomyelitis"

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1/3. A local outbreak of paralytic rabies in Surinam children.

    A rapidly fatal encephalomyelitis, which was in most cases characterized by ascending paralysis, developed in seven children of the age of 3 to 10 years in a bushnegro village in the interior of Surinam. rabies virus was recovered from the central nervous system of three autopsied children. Although the source of infection has not been detected, there is an indication that, at least in some cases, the disease has been transmitted by rat-bite rather than by vampire bats. During the same period a few cases of minor febrile illness occurred in the same community. Since virological and serological evidence of a wide-spread distribution of Coxsackie A virus type 4 was obtained, the latter illness may presumably be attributed to this virus.
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ranking = 1
keywords = rabies
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2/3. Rabies encephaloradiculomyelitis. Case report.

    A 50-year-old carpenter died in Western pennsylvania of rabies on January 4, 1979. He had been hospitalized in an intensive care unit for 28 days. The diagnosis was made postmortem from light and electron microscopic examination of central nervous system tissue. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed the diagnosis later. No animal exposure was confirmed in this case. The clinical and neuropathologic findings of the patient are correlated. The importance of recognizing rabies and the protection of personnel who perform autopsies on these patients is emphasized. In addition, rabies should be considered in the differential diagnosis of radiculomyelitis (guillain-barre syndrome) and, in general, in any case of meningoencephalitis.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = rabies
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3/3. Human rabies encephalomyelitis.

    Seven weeks after he was bitten on the lip by a puppy in the gambia a patient showed symptons of rabies. Passive and active immunisation was begun three days after the onset of symptons. The evidence indicated that death was a direct consequence of the central nervous system disease rather than any associated complication. Our inability to alter the course of the illness appreciably emphasises the importance of immediate postexposure immunisation in rabies and draws attention to the present lack of effective means of preventing virus replication within the central nervous system.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = rabies
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