Cases reported "Endocarditis, Bacterial"

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1/21. bacillus popilliae endocarditis with prolonged complete heart block.

    bacillus popilliae, a fastidious, aerobic, gram-positive, spore-forming bacillus, has never been reported as a pathogen in human infectious diseases. We report the first case of a human infected by the pathogen B. popilliae, which presented as endocarditis involving the bicuspid aortic valve and complicated with prolonged (> 30 days; to our knowledge, the longest in the literature) complete heart block. Although surgery may be warranted by previous reports, the patient was successfully managed by medical treatment instead, because of the absence of evidence from various approaches that support the existence of perivalvular extension of infection.
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keywords = infectious disease
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2/21. Infectious disease emergencies in primary care.

    Infectious disease emergencies can be described as infectious processes that, if not recognized and treated immediately, can lead to significant morbidity or mortality. These emergencies can present as common or benign infections, fooling the primary care provider into using more conservative treatment strategies than are required. This review discusses the pathophysiology, history and physical findings, diagnostic criteria, and treatment strategies for the following infectious disease emergencies: acute bacterial meningitis, ehrlichiosis, rocky mountain spotted fever, meningococcemia, necrotizing soft tissue infections, toxic shock syndrome, food-borne illnesses, and infective endocarditis. Because most of the discussed infectious disease emergencies require hospital care, the primary care clinician must be able to judge when a referral to a specialist or a higher-level care facility is indicated.
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keywords = infectious disease
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3/21. brucellosis: unusual presentations in two adolescent boys.

    Two boys presented with variable signs and symptoms of infectious disease that challenged diagnosis. One of the two patients had aortic valve vegetations and lower extremity aneurysms, and the other had calvarial osteomyelitis, epidural abscess, pleural effusions, and pulmonary nodules. Only after a battery of bacterial and fungal agglutination tests was the unsuspected diagnosis made in each of brucellosis from brucella canis.
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keywords = infectious disease
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4/21. Native valve infective endocarditis: what is the optimal timing for surgery?

    IE remains a dreaded disease masquerading under a myriad of presentations in an evolving epidemiological environment. In our continuing endeavor against this deadly disease, echocardiography has evolved into an indispensable diagnostic tool to define structural complications and guide therapy. Timing of surgical intervention for IE remains a subject of intense debate and depends on the cardiac and systemic complications of the infection, the virulence of the organism, and the responsiveness to medical therapy. A judicious agreement among cardiologist, cardiovascular surgeon, and infectious disease specialist should define whether surgical intervention is warranted and, if so, the optimal timing. Further optimization of guidelines will help in the diagnosis and treatment of endocarditis but will never be a substitute for sound judgment and experience.
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keywords = infectious disease
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5/21. doxycycline and chloroquine as treatment for chronic q fever endocarditis.

    endocarditis is a rare but severe complication of q fever, an infectious disease caused by the intracellular pathogen coxiella burnetii. Heart involvement is the most common clinical presentation of chronic q fever, and it occurs almost invariably in patients with previous valvular disease or artificial valves, and in the immunocompromised host. The optimal treatment of q fever endocarditis is still today debated, and recommended duration of treatment varies from one year to one's lifespan. A case of chronic q fever endocarditis is described in a patient with biological prosthetic aortic valve and aortic homograft, successfully treated with doxycycline and chloroquine for 2 years.
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keywords = infectious disease
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6/21. Infective endocarditis caused by unusual gram-positive pathogens.

    Of a total of 81 patients hospitalized in the infectious diseases department in 1990-2000 with infectious endocarditis caused by Gram-positive pathogen, unusual etiological agents were found in several cases: streptococcus pyogenes, streptococcus pneumoniae, corynebacterium diphtheriae, and gemella morbillorum. Cardiac defects were present in the latter two patients: bicuspid aortic valve and tetralogy of fallot. Two patients were successfully treated with antibiotics only and one patient with antibiotics and surgery. The patient with C. diphtheriae endocarditis died due to progressive sepsis and multiple organ failure.
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keywords = infectious disease
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7/21. Presumed endocarditis caused by BRO beta-lactamase-producing moraxella lacunata in an infant with Fallot's tetrad.

    A case of presumed endocarditis caused by moraxella lacunata in a 15-month-old male infant with Fallot's tetrad is described. This infection may have occurred as the result of transmission of this organism between the father and his son. This is the first report of BRO beta-lactamase-producing M. lacunata causing presumed endocarditis.
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ranking = 0.016951988824146
keywords = transmission
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8/21. Infective endocarditis caused by group G streptococcus with multiple cerebral emboli.

    The group G streptococcal endocarditis is a rare form of infective endocarditis. In this form of infective endocarditis, serious neurological complications most commonly develop. We reported this case because of its being an unusual form of infective endocarditis that was caused by Group G Streptococcus. We also reviewed the literature. The patient was admitted to infectious disease service with a presumptive diagnosis of central nervous system infection. blood cultures were positive for group G streptococcus. There was a mass on the posterior surface of the mitral valve which was 2 x 2.5 cm in length on the echocardiography. In the cranial computerized tomography of our patient, slightly increased contrast media uptake was observed in the both parietal lobes, in the both frontal lobes, and in the anterior areas of right occipital lobe. Therefore, this case was assumed as infective endocarditis caused by group G streptococcus with multiple cerebral emboli. ceftriaxone was given for 4 weeks and gentamicin was given for 2 weeks, and progressive improvement of the patient's condition was seen.
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ranking = 1
keywords = infectious disease
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9/21. body piercing: a rare cause of mitral valve endocarditis.

    body piercing has become a way of life for many individuals. It represents freedom, as well as rebellion, and can provide shock value to the public. Often, it is used as a rite of passage from adolescence into adulthood, and can also provide a boost in self-esteem. However, body piercing may lead to non-infectious complications such as prolonged bleeding and keloid formation, while infectious complications include the transmission of blood-borne infections (e.g. human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis b, C and D), as well as bacteremia through the site of piercing. Infective endocarditis in individuals with congenital heart defects has been identified after body piercing. Here, the first documented case is reported of mitral valve endocarditis in a previously fit and healthy young female following navel piercing.
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ranking = 0.016951988824146
keywords = transmission
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10/21. Case of infectious endocarditis predicted by orbital color Doppler imaging.

    BACKGROUND: There are no specific ocular findings for infectious endocarditis. We report a case of infectious endocarditis detected by combining orbital color Doppler imaging (CDI) and ophthalmological findings. CASE: A 47-year-old man suffered from lumbar pain and low-grade fever. He had undergone heart surgery for a ventricular septal defect and received blood transfusions 20 years earlier, and he had started interferon therapy for chronic hepatitis c 8 months previously. Systemic examinations suggested either collagen disease, malignant lymphoma, or infectious disease. OBSERVATIONS: The patient underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, including CDI. ophthalmoscopy showed multiple cotton-wool patches in both eyes and branch retinal artery occlusion in the left eye. Orbital CDI showed that bilateral ophthalmic arteries and central retinal arteries flowed synchronously with abnormal waves composed of three narrow, sharp peaks. These findings were suggestive of a cardiac valve disorder, which can lead to embolisms. echocardiography established the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of infectious endocarditis detected by orbital CDI.
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ranking = 1
keywords = infectious disease
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