Cases reported "Endometritis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/4. Focal necrotizing endometritis: a clinicopathologic study of 15 cases.

    From routine sign-out of endometrial biopsy specimens, a group of 15 endometria were identified that have a characteristic histologic pattern of inflammation that is not included in present classifications of endometritis. All but one of the women were premenopausal, and all presented with abnormal vaginal bleeding. The lesion is characterized by a patchy, focal inflammation, usually composed of lymphocytes with a variable number of neutrophils and rare macrophages centered around endometrial glands and extending into the glandular lumen with disruption and partial or subtotal necrosis of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These foci were widely dispersed, never confluent, and could be overlooked easily. plasma cells were not found in any of the endometrial specimens despite methyl green pyronine staining of the samples. Based on the histologic characteristics of this process we have designated it focal necrotizing endometritis. The clinical significance, if any, of focal necrotizing endometritis is currently unknown.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = macrophage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/4. hiv-associated endometritis.

    Using immunohistochemical staining, in situ hybridization and a combination of both, we demonstrate here the replication of hiv in the endometrial stroma. Infected cells do not belong to the T-lymphocyte lineage but rather to a monocyte-macrophage cell type. This report suggests a possible relationship between hiv infection and endometritis. Moreover, hiv replication in endometrial tissues could play a role in heterosexual and materno-fetal transmission.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = macrophage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/4. Xanthomatous endometritis.

    A further case of xanthomatous endometritis, characterized by the presence of histiocytic cells in the endometrium, in the absence of carcinoma is described. This lesion seems to be a rare complication of hematometra with cervical occlusion. The foam cells would appear to be macrophages, components of a nonspecific inflammatory reaction, which have phagocytosed breakdown elements of retained endometrial hemorrhage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = macrophage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/4. Xanthogranulomatous endometritis associated with endometrial carcinoma.

    We studied a case of xanthogranulomatous (XG) endometritis associated with endometrial adenocarcinoma. Isolated XG endometritis is a rare entity that may mimic carcinoma as a consequence of the replacement of the endometrium and the invasion of the myometrium by friable yellowish tissue composed of foamy histiocytes. To our knowledge, it has not previously been described as coexisting with a carcinoma. The XG reaction is characterized by pigment-laden foamy cells. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the foamy cells belong to the macrophage/histiocyte series and are not endometrial stromal cells. Histochemical studies revealed the pigment to be composed of hemosiderin and lipofuscin. The absence of calcispherites or a uniform immunoperoxidase staining reaction for alpha 1-antitrypsin excluded the diagnosis of malacoplakia. We have postulated that XG endometritis has a similar etiopathogenesis to XG pyelonephritis and XG cholecystitis. It is a rare morphologic expression of the clinical syndrome of benign senile pyometrium.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = macrophage
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Endometritis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.