Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/9. imipenem resistance of enterobacter aerogenes mediated by outer membrane permeability.

    Multidrug-resistant enterobacter aerogenes strains are increasingly isolated in europe and especially in france. Treatment leads to imipenem resistance, because of a lack of porin. We studied the evolution of resistance in 29 strains isolated from four patients during their clinical course. These strains belonged to the prevalent epidemiological type observed in france in previous studies (C. Bosi, et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 37:2165-2169, 1999; A. Davin-Regli et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:1474-1480, 1996). They also harbored a TEM-24 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-coding gene. Thirteen strains were susceptible to gentamicin and resistant to imipenem and cefepime. All of the patients showed E. aerogenes strains with this resistance after an imipenem treatment. One patient showed resistance to imipenem after a treatment with cefpirome. Twelve of these 13 strains showed a lack of porin. Cessation of treatment with imipenem for three patients was followed by reversion of susceptibility to this antibiotic and the reappearance of porins, except in one case. For one patient, we observed three times in the same day the coexistence of resistant strains lacking porin and susceptible strains possessing porin. The emergence of multidrug-resistant E. aerogenes strains is very disquieting. In our study, infection by E. aerogenes increased the severity of the patients' illnesses, causing a 100% fatality rate.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = enterobacter
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/9. Neonatal brain abscess--potential pitfalls of CT scanning.

    CASE REPORT. A 6-day-old preterm infant collapsed on the neonatal unit and was found to have enterobacter meningitis. Cranial ultrasounds had been normal in the first few days of life, but an ultrasound on day 9 of life showed a well-defined lesion, which was thought to be an abscess in view of his underlying illness. This finding could not be confirmed on CT scanning, which showed oedematous frontal lobes with a lack of grey-white differentiation. OUTCOME. The correct diagnosis and treatment were delayed until a follow-up CT scan showed more typical features of an abscess 4 days later.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = enterobacter
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/9. Acquired haemophilia in a patient with gram-negative urosepsis and bladder cancer.

    We here report a patient who developed a high titer antibody to factor viii (FVIII) during gram-negative urosepsis caused by enterobacter cloacae after complete resection of rectal cancer. The patient initially presented with a life threatening spontaneous hematothorax and multiple large haematomas. Coagulation studies revealed a severe FVIII deficiency <1% with a high FVIII antibody titer of 64 BU. The bleeding responded rapidly to infusions of recombinant factor viia. After achievement of a partial remission (FVIII activity 28%) by combined immunosuppressive therapy (prednisone, cyclophosphamide, plasmapheresis and immunoadsorption), subsequently, two relapses occurred following steroid tapering. Resumption of prednisone and cyclophosphamide treatment combined with immunoadsorption induced a second and third remission, respectively. After resection of a papillary carcinoma of the bladder 6 months later and continuous immunosuppressive therapy with cyclophosphamide, FVIII levels remained stable within normal ranges. This clinical course suggests that the cause of inhibitor formation against FVIII resulting in severe acquired haemophilia was multifactorial and was initiated by the gram-negative urosepsis and probably by the underlying malignancies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = enterobacter
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/9. Nosocomial urosepsis caused by Enterobacter kobei with aberrant phenotype.

    Enterobacter kobei is the species of the enterobacter cloacae complex, which is phenotypically most closely related to the species E. cloacae. This is the first report of infection caused by a new biotype of E. kobei. A patient with a history of urinary bladder operation developed a urosepsis with an Enterobacter isolate displaying the E. cloacae phenotype. The isolate was classified to the species E. kobei by sequence analysis of the 16S-rDNA, 4 protein-coding genes and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-cluster analysis. E. kobei was originally described to be Voges-Proskauer (VP) negative. However, the isolates of the present case were VP-positive. After analyzing 120 biochemical tests included in the API20E and the Biotype 100 systems, 4 biochemical tests were identified potentially differentiating this new biotype from E. cloacae.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = enterobacter
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/9. Enterobacter endocarditis.

    endocarditis due to Enterobacter species is very rare. We recently cared for a patient who developed E. cloacae endocarditis following mitral valve replacement with a porcine heterograft, and was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy alone. A review of the literature disclosed an additional 17 well-described cases of enterobacter endocarditis. Two-thirds of the patients had underlying cardiac disease. The mitral valve was most frequently involved (10/16 cases) with 4 of the patients having concomitant aortic valve involvement. The overall mortality rate was 44.4%. Antibiotic therapy of enterobacter endocarditis should consist of the combination of a beta-lactam antibiotic and an aminoglycoside with careful monitoring of blood cultures to assure the adequacy of therapy. Resistance of enterobacter to previously susceptible antibiotics may occur during therapy due to induction of a chromosomally-mediated beta-lactamase, necessitating a change in antimicrobial therapy. Valvular surgery is indicated for patients failing medical management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.75
keywords = enterobacter
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/9. association of reactive arthropathy and morganella morganii cross reacting with yersinia enterocolitica.

    Two patients exhibited reactive arthropathy in association with chronic diarrhoea and abdominal pain. Rising titres of agglutinating antibody to yersinia enterocolitica O3 were observed in association with arthropathy. morganella morganii was isolated from faeces of one patient in heavy growth. In both patients, absorption of the sera with morganella antigen abolished yersinia reactivity. Morganella titres were more than 8 times the yersinia titres and were unaffected by absorption with Yersinia. Neither patient had detectable antibody to the predominant enterobacterial species present in faeces. One patient developed acute cystitis with proteus mirabilis and had no serological response to the proteus isolate. We conclude that the elevated morganella titres were specific. The role of M. morganii in intestinal disorders remains to be established, but from our findings, it should be added to the list of organisms associated with reactive arthropathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = enterobacter
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/9. endocarditis due to enteric bacilli other than Salmonellae: case reports and literature review.

    The clinical and pathological findings in two recent patients with non-salmonella enterobacterial endocarditis are described, and those of 42 patients in the literature are summarized. Most of the patients acquired their endocarditis secondary to urinary tract infection and had an acute clinical course characterized by high fever and chills. Thirty-two of these patients died, and all except one had a postmortem examination. The most frequent pathological finding was the occurrence of very large vegetations which caused relatively little destruction of the underlying valve. Prompt diagnosis and antibiotic therapy chosen on the basis of bactericidal as well as bacteriostatic activity against the individual bacterium may improve the prognosis in this disease. Results of tricuspid and pulmonic valvulectomies for bacteriologic failure in pseudomonas and in a few cases of enterobacterial endocarditis appear to warrant a surgical approach in patients with right-sided enterobacterial endocarditis who fail to respond to vigorous medical therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.75
keywords = enterobacter
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/9. Acute interstitial nephritis following enterobacteriaceae sepsis.

    A 52-year-old male developed acute renal failure (ARF) following enterobacteriaceae sepsis. The cause of renal failure was remarkable for prolonged, slow, and incomplete recovery. recurrence of enterobacteriaceae infection was associated with fever, cutaneous rash, eosinophilia, and elevated IgE level. Renal biopsy and gallium scan studies confirmed the diagnosis of acute interstitial nephritis. The temporal relationship between the first episode of sepsis and the precipitation of ARF and the development of rash, eosinophilia, and elevated IgE level in association with recurrence of infection indicated the role of bacterial antigen in the induction of immune-mediated injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = enterobacter
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/9. Neonatal enterobacter suppurative arthritis and osteomyelitis.

    Suppurative arthritis of the right knee and osteomyelitis of the adjacent femur complicated a urinary tract infection in an 18-day-old infant with a posterior urethral valve causing urinary flow obstruction. Initially cephalosporine sensitive Enterobacter caused the urinary tract infection. Shortly following cephazolin therapy, cephalosporine resistant Enterobacter microorganisms were isolated both from the urine and the knee joint fluid. These two infections were successfully treated with a combination of gentamicin and Co-trimoxazole. gram-negative bacteria should be considered among the pathogens in neonatal osteoarticular infections, particularly if a urinary tract infection co-exists.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = enterobacter
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Enterobacteriaceae Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.