Cases reported "Enterocolitis"

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1/3. Nongranulomatous chronic idiopathic enterocolitis: a primary histologically defined disease.

    Nongranulomatous chronic idiopathic enterocolitis is characterized by sudden onset of severe watery diarrhea, malabsorption, exudative enteropathy, frequent appearance of shallow ulcerations, and variable degrees of villus atrophy. In the absence of infectious and pharmacologic causes, the presence of a predominantly acute inflammatory infiltrate limited to the lamina propria establishes the diagnosis. No underlying disease appears during prolonged follow-up. The etiology remains unknown. The disease is generally corticosteroid-responsive; low-dose maintenance therapy is frequently required. The long-term prognosis is guarded. Three of 11 patients died of opportunistic infections or resistance to therapy.
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2/3. Management of neutropenic enterocolitis in the patient with cancer.

    Neutropenic enterocolitis is a life-threatening condition often seen in patients experiencing prolonged periods of neutropenia from conditions such as leukemia and lymphoma and from aggressive chemotherapy regimens. Its exact pathologic process remains unclear; however, it has been proposed that direct cytotoxic damage occurs to the bowel mucosa with subsequent microbial invasion complicated by the lack of adequate neutrophil response. The damage may progress to bowel perforation and septic shock. Early recognition and management by healthcare team members are crucial for the improved prognosis of these individuals. Controversy continues to exist concerning management options and the timing of these interventions. This article outlines nursing and medical management of the patient with neutropenic enterocolitis.
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3/3. Persistent portal venous gas.

    This case report describes a patient diagnosed with ongoing portal venous gas, initiated by a rather common campylobacter enterocolitis and maintained by septic thrombophlebitis and possibly by chronic cholecystitis. cholecystectomy attenuated the patient's septic condition. The etiology of portal venous gas determines both the patient's prognosis and the choice for either conservative or surgical treatment. This report describes persistence of portal venous gas for a long period and a possible role for chronic cholecystitis as a cause.
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