Cases reported "Eosinophilia"

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1/58. Polyangiitis overlap syndrome with eosinophilia associated with an elevated serum level of major basic protein.

    Polyangiitis overlap syndrome is a new disease entity and the reported cases in the literature are still limited. We describe a female patient presenting with finger ulcers, skin eruptions, pleural effusion, interstitial pneumonia and eosinophilia. skin biopsy showed systemic small-sized angiitis and thrombosis. She was diagnosed as having polyangiitis overlap syndrome and was successfully then treated with corticosteroid. It is also of interest that the disease activity was correlated with the number of eosinophils in peripheral blood. The measurement of the serum level of major basic protein released from eosinophils functioning as a coagulant indicated the possible association of eosinophilia with thrombosis and polyangiitis.
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keywords = effusion
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2/58. A case of eosinophilic pleural effusion induced by pancreatothoracic fistula.

    A 49-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of a left pleural effusion. Thoracenthesis yielded a hemorrhagic pleural effusion with a high percentage of eosinophils (15.9%). Although there were no significant abdominal signs, serological examinations demonstrated a marked increase of pancreatic enzyme activity. Moreover, abdominal CT demonstrated cystic changes between the tail of the pancreas and the spleen. Accordingly ERP was performed under pressure, and contrast medium draining from the pancreas was observed. Pancreatic pleural effusion in this patient consisted of pancreatic juice retained in the thoracic cavity, which resulted from intrapancreatic fistulation connecting to the thoracic cavity due to a pancreatic cyst caused by chronic pancreatitis. The present report indicates that we should investigate the retention of eosinophilic pleural effusion considering not only the possibility of thoracic disease, but also the possibility of a pleural effusion derived from abdominal diseases.
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ranking = 9
keywords = effusion
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3/58. paragonimiasis westermani with multifocal lesions in lungs and skin.

    We report a case of paragonimus westermani infection with a reticulonodular lesion in the right lung, left pleural effusion, and a mobile subcutaneous mass. Analyses of pleural effusion and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) showed marked eosinophilia and high levels of eosinophil cationic protein and interleukin (IL)-5. Transbronchial lung biopsy revealed the presence of pneumonia with mild eosinophilic infiltration but remarkable lymphocytic infiltration. In this patient, high IL-5 levels in both BALF and pleural effusion could explain the remarkable eosinophilia.
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ranking = 3
keywords = effusion
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4/58. Pleural fluid and serum eosinophilia: association with fluoxetine hydrochloride.

    We report the case of a patient who was treated with fluoxetine hydrochloride (Prozac) for depression. Approximately 8 weeks into the treatment, an eosinophilic pleural effusion and serum eosinophilia developed. An extensive workup for the etiology of eosinophilic pleural effusion was unrevealing. Pleural biopsy showed a nonspecific inflammatory reaction and mild fibrosis. The pleural effusion and eosinophilia resolved within a few weeks of cessation of the drug. fluoxetine can be associated with pleural and serum eosinophilia, possibly through an allergic-mediated reaction.
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ranking = 3
keywords = effusion
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5/58. paragonimiasis miyazakii associated with bilateral pseudochylothorax.

    A 37-year-old man who suffered from bilateral pleural effusions, subcutaneous abdominal induration and blood eosinophilia, was admitted to our hospital. He had ingested raw crabs at a pub-restaurant before the onset of his symptoms. His pleural effusions were chyliform containing cholesterol crystals, and a high level of immunoglobulin e (36,580 IU/ml) and anti-Paragonimus miyazakii antibody were detected. He was effectively treated with praziquantel. This case suggests that paragonimiasis should be strongly suspected if blood eosinophilia, pseudochylothorax, and a high level of immunoglobulin e in pleural effusion are detected.
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ranking = 3
keywords = effusion
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6/58. Acute eosinophilic myocarditis in a young woman.

    The first stage of eosinophilic myocarditis is called the necrotizing phase. This stage of eosinophilic myocarditis of unknown cause is often fulminant and rapidly fatal, occurring predominantly in males. Here, we report a case of eosinophilic myocarditis in the acute necrotizing phase occurred without known cause in a 23-year-old Japanese female. Severe diffuse hypokinesis of the left ventricular wall motion (ejection fraction 19.3%), significant concentric edematous thickening of the left ventricular wall (20.1 mm in diastole) and a moderate amount of pericardial effusion (10 mm wide echo free space posteriorly) were revealed by echocardiography. eosinophils were observed and degranulated eosinophilic cationic proteins were stained with antibody against eosinophilic cationic proteins (EG2) in the myocardial specimens obtained by myocardial biopsy. In spite of its severity, the disease resolved promptly with steroid therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = effusion
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7/58. Eosinophilic pleural effusion due to mesalamine. Report of a rare occurrence.

    mesalamine-induced lung toxicity has often been described. We report on a case of a patient who underwent mesalamine treatment, though in the absence of established criteria required for diagnosing Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). He developed an adverse respiratory reaction to the drug, thus definitely proving its lung damaging capacity. The clinical presentation included eosinophilic pleural effusion, a feature never previously described in association with mesalamine intake.
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ranking = 5
keywords = effusion
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8/58. life-threatening eosinophilic pleuropericardial effusion related to vitamins B5 and H.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of eosinophilic pleuropericarditis resulting from concomitant use of vitamins B5 and H. CASE SUMMARY: A 76-year-old white woman was admitted to the hospital because of chest pain and dyspnea related to pleurisy and a pericardial tamponade. This patient had no history of allergy and had been taking vitamins B5 and H for two months. blood tests performed showed an inflammatory syndrome and a high eosinophil concentration (1200-1500 cells/mm3). Pleurocentesis and pericardiotomy yielded a sterile exudative fluid with an eosinophilic infiltrate. There were no nuclear antibodies and no rheumatic factor; screenings for viruses, parasites, bacteria, and malignant tumor were negative. A myelogram, biopsy of the iliac crest bone, and concentration of immunoglobulin e were also normal. After withdrawal of the vitamins, the patient recovered and the eosinophilia disappeared. DISCUSSION: Prolonged hypereosinophilia has marked predilection to damage specific organs, including the heart, but pleuropericardial effusion is uncommon. Drug-related pleuropericarditis usually occurs without an increased eosinophil count. Other drugs responsible for eosinophilic pleuropericarditis are cephalosporins, dantrolene, propylthiouracil, and nitrofurantoin. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of pleuropericarditis related to vitamins B5 and H. CONCLUSIONS: This case suggests that vitamins B5 and H may cause symptomatic, life-threatening, eosinophilic pleuropericarditis. physicians prescribing these commonly used vitamins should be aware of this potential adverse reaction.
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ranking = 5
keywords = effusion
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9/58. Eosinophilic pleural effusion due to dantrolene: resolution with steroid therapy.

    A quadriplegic patient with severe spasticity, treated with dantrolene (400 mg daily) for 5 years, had dyspnea, orthopnea, hypoxia, and right-sided opacity of the chest on radiograph. At thoracentesis, an exudative effusion containing 64% eosinophils was documented, with simultaneous peripheral eosinophilia of 11%. An allergic reaction to dantrolene was postulated. Despite withdrawal of the offending medication and repeated thoracenteses, symptomatic recurrence of effusion persisted for 4 days. After institution of prednisone therapy, rapid resolution of symptoms, signs, hypoxia, and radiologic abnormalities was observed. In contrast to five previously reported cases of dantrolene-associated eosinophilic pleural effusion (EPE), ours represents the first in which the patient was treated with steroids and suggests that steroid therapy may be of benefit in drug-related EPE.
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ranking = 7
keywords = effusion
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10/58. Clinical characteristics of so called eosinophilic otitis media.

    OBJECTIVE: Although "eosinophilic otitis media" is not as uncommon a condition as was previously believed, its cause and pathogenesis are not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics in patients with "eosinophilic otitis media" to clarify its pathogenesis. methods: Seven adult patients with persistent and intractable otitis media with viscous middle ear effusion containing many eosinophils, who were also under treatment for bronchial asthma, were studied. The following examinations were conducted: nasopharyngeal endoscopy, pure-tone audiometry, eustachian tube function test, temporal bone CT scan, blood analysis, bacterial and fungal culture of middle ear effusion, histological study of the middle ear and nasal specimens, and measurement of eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) in middle ear effusion. RESULTS: Some patients had persistent perforation with papillomatous granulation tissue arising from the mesotympanic mucosa, and all the patients had nasal polyposis. The pure-tone audiometry showed the mixed-type of hearing loss in all the patients, and the hearing level deteriorated progressively during the course in some patients. The eustachian tube function was not always poor but was patulous in some cases. The most severely diseased areas were in the eustachian tube and mesotympanum by temporal bone CT images. All the seven patients had the high levels of total serum IgE, but the RAST scores were negative in three patients and low grade in three patients. The accumulation of eosinophils was observed in middle ear effusion, middle ear mucosa and nasal polyps, and the eosinophils were highly activated with degranulation. High level of ECP was also recovered from middle ear effusion. CONCLUSIONS: Active eosinophilic inflammation occurs in the entire respiratory tract, including the middle ear in these patients. From our present investigation, we propose the criteria and clinical characteristics of "eosinophilic otitis media".
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ranking = 5
keywords = effusion
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