Cases reported "Eosinophilia"

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1/27. The spectrum of pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis beyond infancy: a clinical series of 30 children.

    OBJECTIVES: eosinophilic esophagitis, previously confused with esophageal inflammation due to gastroesophageal reflux, has recently begun to be distinguished from it. We undertook this analysis of our large series of children with the condition to clarify its spectrum: its presenting symptoms; its relation to allergy, respiratory disease, and reflux; its endoscopic and histological findings; and its diagnosis and therapy. methods: We analyzed the details of our clinical series of 30 children with eosinophilic esophagitis, defining it as > or =5 eosinophils per high power field in the distal esophageal epithelium. Retrospective chart review was supplemented by prospective, blinded, duplicate quantitative evaluation of histology specimens, and by telephone contact with some families to clarify subsequent course. Presentation and analysis of the series as a whole is preceded by a case illustrating a typical presentation with dysphagia and recurrent esophageal food impactions. RESULTS: Presenting symptoms encompass vomiting, pain, and dysphagia (some with impactions or strictures). Allergy, particularly food allergy, is an associated finding in most patients, and many have concomitant asthma or other chronic respiratory disease. A subtle granularity with furrows or rings is newly identified as the endoscopic herald of histological eosinophilic esophagitis. Histological characteristics include peripapillary or juxtaluminal eosinophil clustering in certain cases. association with eosinophilic gastroenteritis occurs, but is not common. Differentiation from gastroesophageal reflux disease is approached by analyzing eosinophil density and response to therapeutic trials. Therapy encompasses dietary elimination and anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy. CONCLUSION: awareness of the spectrum of eosinophilic esophagitis should promote optimal diagnosis and treatment of this elusive entity, both in children and in adults.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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2/27. Multiple esophageal rings: an association with eosinophilic esophagitis: case report and review of the literature.

    Esophagitis may present endoscopically with erythema, edema, loss of vascular pattern, friability, and ulceration of the esophageal mucosa. Left untreated, chronic esophagitis may result in stricture formation. The presence of multiple concentric rings involving the entire esophagus has been cited as a chronic form of esophagitis. We present a case of an 8-yr-old boy with multiple concentric esophageal rings and histological evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis, who failed medical antireflux treatment and responded to an elimination diet.
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ranking = 0.8749369204763
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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3/27. Subglottic stenosis complicated by allergic esophagitis: case report.

    Allergic esophagitis is a known entity that had been described in patients with dysphagia. It has not been previously described in association with subglottic stenosis. We report the case of a 2-year-old girl with symptoms suggestive of allergic esophagitis who suffered from subglottic stenosis that recurred despite surgical measures. Her esophageal ph monitoring results were normal, and she did not respond to antireflux medications. She did respond dramatically to corticosteroid therapy with improvement of both her esophageal and laryngeal symptoms. Allergic esophagitis as a clinical entity is discussed.
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ranking = 0.8749369204763
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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4/27. Successful medical treatment of two patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Significant oesophageal eosinophilia is associated with oesophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a rare disease that causes thickening of the oesophageal wall, narrowing of the oesophageal lumen, and severe motor disturbance. methods AND RESULTS: Two 12 yr-old patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis were studied prospectively. Clinical and investigation details are presented. Elemental formula was administered until complete remission of disease. Final outcome was assessed after 3 months on regular diet with exclusion of specific allergic components. Both patients responded to the dietary manipulation. CONCLUSIONS: Eosinophilic oesophagitis must be included in the differential diagnosis when dealing with oesophageal strictures of unknown or unclear aetiology. Elimination diet therapy plays a crucial role in ameliorating the course of the illness. blood eosinophilia correlates with therapeutic response and with improvement of the disease.
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ranking = 0.99992236366313
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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5/27. Fragility of the esophageal mucosa: a pathognomonic endoscopic sign of primary eosinophilic esophagitis?

    BACKGROUND: Primary eosinophilic esophagitis, a chronic inflammatory disorder of the esophagus, evokes recurrent dysphagia. endoscopy is often unremarkable, and no consensus exists regarding management of resultant dysphagia. The response of a series of patients with primary eosinophilic esophagitis to dilation is reported together with a description of a possibly pathognomonic sign: fragile esophageal mucosa, for which the term "crepe-paper" mucosa is introduced. methods: Five men underwent endoscopy because of dysphagia confirmed (clinically, endoscopically, and histologically) to be caused by primary eosinophilic esophagitis and were treated by bouginage. OBSERVATIONS: All patients had extremely fragile, inelastic, and delicate mucosa, which tore easily even with minor trauma. After the procedure, patients remained asymptomatic for 3 to 24 months. CONCLUSIONS: Primary eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by fragile esophageal mucosa that readily tears in response to minor trauma during otherwise uneventful diagnostic endoscopy. This "crepe-paper" sign may alert endoscopists to the presence of the disease when other mucosal alterations are lacking. Dilation is effective for patients with symptoms with minimal morbidity, despite development of disquieting lesions in response to the procedure.
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ranking = 0.9998835454947
keywords = esophagitis
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6/27. Primary eosinophilic esophagitis.

    eosinophilic esophagitis is an uncommon pathology that generally affects children with a history of allergies and intrinsic asthma. We present a clinical case of eosinophilic esophagitis in a 16-year-old boy with upper dysphagia for solids since childhood. The analytical study showed only a repeat serum eosinophilia. barium transit disclosed a reduction in caliber of the whole esophagus. Functional esophageal tests with pH monitoring and manometry were normal. endoscopy showed a small-diameter esophagus and fibrosis with a very friable mucosa. The histological study of the esophageal biopsies revealed a full thickness major eosinophil infiltration of the esophagus. These findings suggest a differential diagnosis with a great variety of pathologies that can cause similar lesions in the esophagus, especially between primary eosinophilic esophagitis and eosinophilic esophagitis secondary to gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). We implemented medical treatment with oral corticoids and total suppression of allergens from the diet, and the patient was asymptomatic.
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ranking = 0.99992236366313
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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7/27. Eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus: gastroesophageal reflux versus eosinophilic esophagitis in children--discussion on daily practice.

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Children presenting with persistent symptoms attributed to gastroesophaeal reflux disease (GERD) that are unresponsive to both medical and surgical therapies are commonly submitted to esophageal biopsies, the results of which show an abnormal presence of eosinophils. In this setting, eosinophilic esophagitis may be the correct diagnosis. The purpose of this report is to clarify the importance of esophageal eosinophilic infiltration, regardless of whether associated with acid reflux, ie, as an independent symptomatic entity, when treating a patient with refractory GERD. methods: Two boys, aged 8 and 7 years, had the classic symptoms of GERD. They were treated with antacid without improvement of the esophagic lesions. Subsequent esophageal biopsy results showed marked eosinophilic infiltration. From this moment on, eosinophilic esophagitis started to be considered the main diagnosis. RESULTS: Although eosinophilic infiltration caused by GERD is very frequently found in esophageal biopsy, in case of refractory drug treatment and microscopic findings of a great number of eosinophils and mast cells, eosinophilic esophagitis must be considered. This disease is better treated with corticoids instead of antacid drugs. It explains the reason some patients do not respond to antacid and surgical treatment and remain symptomatic with esophagic lesions. CONCLUSIONS: In refractory cases of GERD, eosinophilic esophagitis must be considered before any surgical measure.
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ranking = 1.0001164545053
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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8/27. A new case of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is a rarely diagnosed condition involving eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa The hallmark of this condition is intermittent and often painful dysphagia that may become constant as the disease progresses. It was initially included within the more general condition known as eosinophilic gastroenteritis but it is now considered an independent entity. Attwood et al. called attention to eosinophilic esophagitis as a distinct clinical condition in 1993. Although eosinophilic esophagitis was thought to occur primarily in children, a significant body of evidence suggests that it affects adults as well. We describe a clinical case of a young woman with a long-standing history of dysphagia affected of this rare entity.
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ranking = 0.87489810230786
keywords = esophagitis
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9/27. Idiopathic eosinophilic oesophagitis: atypical presentation of a rare disease.

    A 72 year-old man presented severe dysphagia and weight loss of recent onset. Repeated oesophageal endoscopy and biopsies with macroforceps were normal. Oesophageal manometry disclosed features compatible with achalasia. Oesophageal EUS endoscopy localized an infiltrating process between muscular layers of the oesophageal wall and CT scan delimited a circular thickening in the inferior part of the oesophagus. Because of severe clinical presentation mimicking a possible oesophageal neoplasm like a lymphoma, partial oesophagectomy was performed and revealed eosinophilic oesophagitis. This unusual presentation emphasizes that idiopathic eosinophilic oesophagitis must be proposed in the differential diagnosis of dysphagia, even in old patient without apparent oesophageal lesion at endoscopy.
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ranking = 0.74991265912103
keywords = esophagitis
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10/27. Ringed oesophagus and idiopathic eosinophilic oesophagitis in adults: an association in two cases.

    Ringed oesophagus is an increasingly recognised finding in young people presenting with dysphagia and may be related to eosinophilic oesophagitis. Recently, hypotheses regarding potential aetiologies have been proposed but these have not been systemically tested in the majority of reported cases. We report two cases very similar in clinical history and endoscopic findings. An association with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or motility abnormalities of the oesophagus were ruled out in both. Histological analysis revealed high-density infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa by eosinophils and excluded gastro-duodenal involvement. Examinations of the oesophagus at the time of low frequency dysphagia, some years before presentation to our centre, did not show rings, suggesting that multiple rings are a possible late complication of eosinophilic oesophagitis. Oesophageal dilatation effectively relieved dysphagia in our two patients.
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ranking = 0.74995147728946
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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