Cases reported "Eosinophilia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. Eosinophilic fasciitis associated with L-tryptophan ingestion.

    OBJECTIVE: To present the first case of eosinophilic fasciitis associated with L-tryptophan ingestion. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 23-year-old Australian man developed myalgia and weakness, and later the clinical features of eosinophilic fasciitis, while taking L-tryptophan. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: The amino acid supplementation was discontinued and he was treated with prednisone (30 mg/day) for six weeks with significant improvement. CONCLUSION: In sclerodermatous skin diseases, such as eosinophilic fasciitis, the possibility of ingestion of tryptophan-containing products should be considered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. Bullous pemphigoid in a patient with psoriasis and possible drug reaction: a case report.

    Bullous pemphigoid, first described in 1953 by Lever, is the most common autoimmune blistering skin disease. As such,this disorder may be encountered relatively frequently in the dermatologist's office, though it is a rarity on the inpatient medicine wards. Lesions develop when autoantibodies are directed against glycoproteins BPAG1 and BPAG2, hemidesmosomes that are embedded in the epidermal basement membrane. The immune complex triggers a complement cascade that activates neutrophils and eosinophils, resulting in the release of proteolytic enzymes. As a result, subepidermal bullae develop; the diagnosis is confirmed by histological examination of skin biopsy. The case of bullous pemphigoid described here presented the treating team with some diagnostic challenges because of the patient's concomitant history of psoriasis and apparent dermatologic reaction to cephalexin. Though the patient's skin lesions resolved rapidly with appropriate treatment, the case generated many questions about the diagnosis and most effective management of bullous pemphigoid.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. syndrome of severe skin disease, eosinophilia, and dermatopathic lymphadenopathy in patients with HTLV-II complicating human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Two intravenous drug users dually infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (hiv-1) and human T-cell leukemia virus type II (HTLV-II) developed an unusual severe dermatitis characterized by progressive brawny induration, fissuring, and ulceration of the skin, with an associated CD8 cell infiltration in one patient. Both patients had persistent eosinophilia. Lymph node biopsy revealed dermatopathic lymphadenopathy, an unusual pathologic finding in hiv-1 infection but one seen in association with mycosis fungoides and other skin disorders. Two new isolates of HTLV-II virus were established from these patients and were identified as HTLV-II by Southern blotting. This type of skin disease and lymph node pathology has not been found in other intravenous drug users who have been infected with hiv-1 alone or in patients in other risk groups for hiv-1 infection. HTLV-II may play a role in this unique new disease pattern in patients infected with hiv-1.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. Eosinophilic cellulitis associated with urticaria. A report of two cases.

    Two patients with the clinical and histopathologic findings of eosinophilic cellulitis are presented. In one patient there was a definite relationship between upper respiratory tract infection and flare-ups of eosinophilic cellulitis. This patient's condition was superimposed on a long history of chronic urticaria. In the other patient a relationship to recurrent sinusitis was possible but not definite. There were no other contributory underlying skin diseases in either patient. Eosinophilic cellulitis is not likely a disease entity as such but, instead, represents a severe urticarial hypersensitivity reaction to various stimuli. collagen alteration by eosinophil granules results in flame figure formation and a granulomatous response, which may explain the prolonged persistence of the lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. Eosinophilic histiocytosis: a variant form of lymphomatoid papulosis or a disease sui generis?

    Five patients are reported on whose clinical skin disease consisted of polymorphous papulonodular lesions healing with a depigmented scar. Although all cases had been termed lymphomatoid papulosis after clinical or histologic examination, the lesions consisted principally of masses of histiocytes and eosinophils. Individual lesions healed spontaneously or with minimal treatment, but the chronic course of disease was not altered by any therapy used. Follow-up 3 to 17 years later indicated persistent or recurrent disease, and one patient died of histiocytic malignancy. Eosinophilic histiocytosis is the microscopic picture of an unusual group of patients with chronic papulonodular necrotic skin disease that may deserve to be considered a disease pattern per se.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia.

    angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia is a rare, benign skin disease of unknown etiology. In the western hemisphere it occurs mostly in females and is located mostly in the head and neck. Microscopically, it is characterized by dermal and subcutaneous infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils; neocapillary formation; and lymphohistiocytic hyperplasia. Effective treatment requires total excision.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis: successful treatment with interferon-alpha.

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (Ofuji's disease) is a rare skin disease of unknown etiology characterized by infiltrated circinate plaques with sterile follicular pustules in primarily seborrheic areas. Several therapeutic regimens have been reported to control the disease with inconsistent results. We here report on a patient with Ofuji's disease, who was successfully treated with interferon-alpha 2b.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. HIV-associated eosinophilic pustular folliculitis: successful treatment of a Japanese patient with UVB phototherapy.

    We report the successful treatment with ultraviolet B phototherapy of a patient with HIV-associated eosinophilic pustular folliculitis. We were able to observe the clinical and therapeutic course for about one year and three months. This 35-year-old homosexual Japanese man presented with disseminated, discrete, follicular, erythematous papules with intense pruritus over his face, neck, chest wall, and upper back. Initially, the eruption responded to therapy with topical or oral indomethacin and oral H1 antihistamine. However, the eruption was highly prone to recurrence, and it gradually failed to respond to these therapies. The eruption became chronic and persistent and manifested the excoriated, prurigo-like nodules that are typical of reported pruritic papular eruption, suggesting that this skin disease and HIV-associated eosinophilic pustular folliculitis are two forms of the same disease entity. UVB phototherapy in small doses was very effective for the persistent eruption, and no recurrence of the eruption was noted during or since the six-month maintenance therapy (once a week at a dose equivalent to 0.75 of the minimal erythema dose) (9 months total). No unfavorable side effects have been observed during or after the UVB phototherapy (cumulative UVB doses of 2,320 mJ/cm2).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Eosinophilia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.