Cases reported "Epidermal Cyst"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/13. Laparoscopic splenectomy for a giant splenic epidermoid cyst: report of a case.

    The use of laparoscopic splenectomy has increased in recent years, primarily for patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). We describe herein the first known case of a laparoscopic splenectomy to be performed in japan for a patient with a giant splenic epidermoid cyst. A 26-year-old woman presented to our hospital with the major complaint of a feeling of abdominal fullness. Prior to surgery, an ultrasound-guided splenic cyst puncture was conducted for diagnostic purposes as well as to reduce the size of the cyst. The carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) level was found to be elevated in the cystic contents and in the serum. Under laparoscopic guidance, the splenic vessels were ligated using a device for extracorporeal ligation, then divided. After the resected spleen had been placed in a retrieval bag, it was delivered out of the abdominal cavity without fragmentation. Following surgery, the patient's serum CA 19-9 level returned to normal. Splenic epidermoid cysts are most often encountered in young women, and laparoscopic surgery to remove cysts of this type is both minimally invasive and excellent from a cosmetic standpoint. Thus, laparoscopic surgery should be considered as the method of choice for the majority of patients diagnosed with a splenic epidermoid cyst.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/13. Reversal of increased intracranial pressure with removal of a torcular epidermoid: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Venous obstruction has been postulated as a cause of increased intracranial pressure, but it has been documented rarely. We present a case of obstruction of the torcula by a slow-growing epidermoid. The tumor caused increased intracranial pressure, which was relieved when it was excised. In addition, the torcular epidermoid is associated with a bifid straight sinus. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 35-year-old man presented with a headache and a lump on the back of the head. physical examination revealed a firm, bony lesion approximately 4 x 4 cm in size. Lumbar puncture demonstrated an intraspinal pressure of 39 cm H2O. Neuroradiological studies revealed an epidermoid that compressed and almost completely occluded the torcula. INTERVENTION: After the tumor was resected, the intraspinal pressure decreased to 19 cm H2O and remained stable 6 months later. CONCLUSION: Pure venous obstruction causes increased intracranial pressure. Removal of the obstruction relieves the intracranial hypertension. In addition, computed tomographic venography is a safe and easy method of documenting torcular anatomy, and it was useful in the follow-up of this patient. Computed tomographic venography can demonstrate a double straight sinus, which is a congenital variant that may be associated with the epidermoid.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/13. A simple surgical technique for the treatment of steatocystoma multiplex.

    BACKGROUND: Since steatocystoma multiplex is an uncommon disorder, its treatment has not been discussed in detail in the textbooks and surgical excision is the most commonly mentioned method. In this article, we describe a very simple surgical technique, which was developed by modifying previous reports. methods: A 29-year-old woman, diagnosed clinically and histologically as steatocystoma multiplex, was treated with this modified technique. We punctured the cysts under local anesthesia with a sharp-tipped cautery point and evacuated the contents by squeezing the cyst with a fine forceps. Then, the cyst wall was grasped by the forceps and the sacs were extracted through small holes. More than 50 cysts were treated. RESULTS: The treatment was well tolerated by the patient. No complications developed during or after the procedure. After 14 months follow up no recurrences were observed and the results were cosmetically excellent. CONCLUSIONS: This modified technique is very simple and time saving. Its cosmetic and long-term results are successful. We believe that it must be considered as the treatment of choice for steatocystoma multiplex.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/13. Iatrogenic spinal epidermoid tumor. A complication of spinal puncture in an adult.

    A case of an intraspinal epidermoid tumor following a lumbar puncture (LP) is described. This tumor developed 5 years after a LP in a man aged 31 years. The majority of epidermoid tumors reported are late complications of spinal puncture during the early neonatal period. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the third oldest patient, whose symptoms presented relatively early after the initial LP. He was successfully treated by surgery. Pathologic diagnosis revealed an epidermoid cyst. The relation between LP and epidermoid tumor and the possible risk factors involved are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/13. Acquired lumbar epidermoid cyst in an adult.

    A 61-year-old female complained of low back pain, and had been treated by spinal anesthetic injection more than 70 times over 14 years. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, performed at the age of 47 years, revealed no abnormal lesion. However, she developed irritable hypesthetic pain in the left leg at 61 years of age. MR imaging revealed a round mass appearing isointense on the T1-weighted and slightly hyperintense on the T2-weighted images. laminectomy revealed an epidermoid cyst, which was removed. This case clearly demonstrates that adults can acquire epidermoid tumor which very probably has an iatrogenic origin. The incidence of epidermoid tumor is low, but we should be aware of the potential adverse complications such as formation of epidermoid tumors after lumbar puncture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/13. epidermal cyst of the breast mimicking malignancy: clinical, radiological, and histological correlation.

    BACKGROUND: epidermal cyst of the breast is a rare benign intramammary lesion; however, a common finding in other parts of the body and most often located in the scalp, back, and neck. Only a few cases of epidermal cysts of the breast have been reported in literature. CASE REPORT: The patient presented with a small movable left breast lump. mammography and ultrasonography did not show features of a benign lesion. Ultrasound-guided core biopsy was undertaken. histology showed an epidermal cyst. The patient returned with an inflammation at the puncture site and a small abscess seen on ultrasound. The abscess was removed surgically. CONCLUSION: Mammographic and sonographic features of an epidermal cyst may mimick a malignant lesion. biopsy can result in complications, such as inflammation. In addition, an association between epidermal cyst and squamous carcinoma has been reported. Therefore, it is recommended that these lesions are resected.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/13. Iatrogenic intraspinal epidermoid tumor: case report.

    Iatrogenic spinal epidermoid tumors are extremely rare and may be caused by skin fragments which were implanted in the spine as a result of a trauma or lumbar puncture. Due to the time lag between the lumbar puncture and the development of a symptomatic tumor, this relationship is often overlooked and can cause a delay in the proper diagnosis. Here, we report a rare case of an intraspinal epidermoid tumor, which developed 7 years after a lumbar puncture in a 12-year-old boy, who presented with back pain and radiating pain to the posterior of both thighs. A total excision of the tumor via L3-L4 hemilaminectomy yielded a good functional recovery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/13. Intraspinal epidermoid tumors in children: problems in recognition and imaging techniques for diagnosis.

    Iatrogenic intraspinal epidermoid tumors are very rare. The similarity of the clinical manifestations of the tumor with other childhood problems can pose a problem in diagnosis. In addition, because of the lag in time between the lumbar puncture and the development of a symptomatic tumor, this relationship is overlooked and can cause a delay in diagnosis, as in the present report of four children. magnetic resonance imaging was found to be superior to myelography in defining the tumor and its relationship to other structures inside the dural sac. All patients underwent surgical excision, with subsequent resolution of symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/13. Iatrogenic intraspinal epidermoid tumor: myelo-CT and MRI diagnosis.

    An 11-year-old boy, treated for acute lymphatic leukemia at the age of 2 with intrathecal injections of methotrexate, presented with a two year history of pain and signs of lumbo-sacral lesion. MRI, myelography and myelo-CT demonstrated an intradural L4-L5 epidermoid tumor which was removed. Iatrogenic implantation of epithelial cells at the age of two with lumbar punctures is most likely. Decline in incidence of lumbar iatrogenic epidermoid cysts, now an exceedingly rare event, is probably related to improved needles for lumbar punctures.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/13. Iatrogenic spinal epidermoid tumour associated with tuberous sclerosis. A diagnostic pitfall.

    We present a case of spinal epidermoid tumour that was probably caused by lumbar punctures. The tumour was detected on MRI in a child with tuberous sclerosis complaining of atypical low back pain. Preoperatively the tumour was considered to be a cystic astrocytoma of ependymoma of the conus terminalis. The association of tuberous sclerosis with a spinal tumour is rare but has been recorded in the literature. The diagnosis was an epidermoid tumour (E.T.). The MRI appearances were unusual for a spinal ET: the signal intensity changes were different from those reported in the literature and the presence of calcification and cavitation has not yet been reported. This case represents a diagnostic pitfall, since both entities were unrelated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Epidermal Cyst'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.