Cases reported "Epiglottitis"

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1/61. Radiological findings in acute adult epiglottitis.

    Acute epiglottitis is a rare but life-threatening disease that commonly occurs in children, and also rarely in adults. The symptoms may be mild and non-specific before a rapid onset of airway obstruction occurs. early diagnosis is essential, as delayed treatment is associated with a high rate of complications including death. We present the clinical and radiological findings of this unusual condition in an adult.
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ranking = 1
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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2/61. Acute epiglottitis despite vaccination with haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine.

    We present the case of a 20-month-old child who required admission to the intensive care with a presumptive diagnosis of acute laryngo-tracheo-bronchitis, for the management of acute upper airway obstruction. This child had received a complete course of haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine. Subsequent events showed that the diagnosis was not laryngo-tracheo-bronchitis but acute epiglottitis. We propose that a full course of vaccination is no guarantee against a subsequent illness with Hib and may actually lead to the wrong diagnosis and possibly life-threatening consequences.
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ranking = 1
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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3/61. Post-varicella epiglottitis and necrotizing fasciitis.

    Varicella is a nearly ubiquitous acquired childhood disease. Infectious complications of varicella can be life- or limb-threatening. These complications appear 3 to 4 days after the appearance of varicella exanthem and are heralded by fever, pain, and erythema of the overlying skin. Airway complications of varicella are rare, rapidly evolving, and, unfortunately, difficult to visualize. We report a child who presented with a unique combination of varicella-induced airway complications-acute epiglottitis and subsequent necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck. varicella, epiglottitis, necrotizing fasciitis, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus, nasopharyngoscopy.
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ranking = 0.052946233441707
keywords = airway
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4/61. Acute epiglottitis as a cause of airway obstruction in an adult patient.

    epiglottitis in adults is a dangerous infectious disease with a rising incidence and potential fatal complications as illustrated in this case report. Like in children, skilled and aggressive airway protection with appropriate antibiotic therapy have been effective in reducing mortality.
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ranking = 4.0529462334417
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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5/61. Adult epiglottitis: an under-recognized, life-threatening condition.

    epiglottitis in the adult can be fatal and should be treated with the same degree of concern and suspicion in respect of airway patency as in children. We present three cases of adult epiglottitis in which the airway was lost prior to or during the intervention of an anaesthetist. We suggest that an emphasis on conservative management is distracting and belies the serious nature of this disease.
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ranking = 0.10589246688341
keywords = airway
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6/61. Bag-mask ventilation as a temporizing measure in acute infectious upper-airway obstruction: does it really work?

    jaw-thrust and bag-mask ventilation usually provide adequate oxygenation in patients with acute infectious upper-airway obstruction (AIUAO). It is the treatment of choice for patients on the way to hospital or in an emergency department until definitive stabilization is achieved with available resources. We report three fatal case studies showing ineffective bag-mask ventilation in AIUAO that raise concerns over this treatment. Case 1 is a 4-year-old patient with epiglottitis who suffered complete obstruction during transport to the hospital. Case 2 is a 3-year-old patient with epiglottitis who suffered complete obstruction during transport to the hospital. Case 3 is a 3-year-old child with viral laryngotracheitis and respiratory arrest just after the admission. Should the approach of bag-mask ventilation in AIUAO change to ventilate patients in the prone position? This approach offers two advantages. First, gravity helps the epiglottis fall forward, reducing the airway obstructions. Second, if the patient vomits during ventilation, the vomit will fall to the floor. During bag-mask ventilation in patients with severe partial airway obstruction, ventilation pressure is high. Gastric inflation may occur and rapidly distend the stomach. This gastric distension interferes with ventilation by elevating the diaphragm, resulting in a decreased lung volume. Cricoid pressure could prevent gastric distension in these instances and should be recommended.
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ranking = 7.0305677589214
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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7/61. Use of the Bullard laryngoscope in the adult patient with epiglottitis: a case report.

    This case report involves the anesthetic management of a rare case of adult epiglottitis. It is unique in that there are real photographs of the illness and a previously undocumented use of a specific airway adjunct in acute epiglottitis, the Bullard laryngoscope. Management of the case from start to finish is discussed, as well as the usefulness of the Bullard laryngoscope in a difficult intubation scenario.
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ranking = 0.052946233441707
keywords = airway
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8/61. Upper airway obstruction in a young adult.

    Acute epiglottitis is a potentially rapidly fatal illness. Although commonly thought of as a disease affecting children, it is increasingly being diagnosed in adults. We report a case of upper airway obstruction due to epiglottitis in a 37-year-old female. The need for early diagnosis because of the risk of a fatal outcome is highlighted.
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ranking = 5
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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9/61. Acute epiglottitis in adults. Presentation of cases.

    Acute epiglottitis is a dangerous disease which is not often seen in adults. early diagnosis and medical attention is required. Relief of airway obstruction by intubation or tracheostomy is necessary in most cases. ampicillin plus chloramphenicol or only cefotaxime is administered, pending a report on sensitivities. 3 cases of acute epiglottitis in adults are presented. The management is discussed in view to avoid this disease's possible fatal outcome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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10/61. Thermal epiglottitis after swallowing hot tea.

    Acute infectious epiglottitis in children is a well-recognized clinical entity. We report the development of acute thermal epiglottitis after ingestion of hot tea by a three-year-old patient. Clinical and radiographic findings in our patient and others reported in the literature resemble acute infectious epiglottitis. In all cases of burns around the mouth, the possibility of intraoral and respiratory damage must be considered. Because of the high risk of upper airway obstruction, children in whom thermal epiglottitis is suspected should be observed in the intensive care unit and have appropriate airway management.
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ranking = 1.0529462334417
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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