Cases reported "Epilepsy, Complex Partial"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/29. Long-term results of vagus nerve stimulation in refractory epilepsy.

    vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an adjunctive antiepileptic treatment for patients with refractory epilepsy. Limited information on long-term treatment with VNS is available. The purpose of this paper is to present our experience with VNS with a follow-up of up to 4 years. Twenty-five patients (13 females and 12 males) with refractory partial epilepsy were treated with VNS. The first 15 patients with a mean age of 30 years and a mean duration of epilepsy of 17.5 years have sufficient follow-up for analysis. Mean post-implantation follow-up was 29 months and mean stimulation output 2.25 mA. There was a mean seizure frequency reduction from 14 complex partial seizures (CPS) per month before implantation to 8 CPS per month after implantation (P = 0.0016; Wilcoxon signed-rank rest (WSRT)). The mean maximum CPS-free interval changed from 9 to 312 days (P = 0.0007; WSRT). Six patients were free of CPS for at least one year. In one patient, one antiepileptic drug (AED) was tapered; in 10 patients, AEDs remained unchanged; in four, one adjunctive AED was administered. Side effects occurred in six patients, three of whom required a temporary reduction of output current. Nine patients reported no side effects at all. Treatment with VNS remains effective in the long-term. In this series 4 / 15 (27%) patients with highly refractory epilepsy experienced entirely seizure-free intervals of 12 months or more.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/29. seizures in Chiari I malformation: a clinical and electroencephalographic study.

    Seven subjects with Chiari I malformations and seizures (four males, three females; age range 11 years, 7 months to 36 years; mean, 22.28 /- 7.58 years; median, 21) were identified in four different centers from among a group of 10 patients. Our aim was to analyze clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of seizures in this etiologically homogeneous group of patients. Most of the seizures were of the complex partial type, and paroxysmal abnormalities were mainly localized over the frontal and temporal regions. The course of the epilepsy was rather benign, with complete control of seizures in four patients and an important reduction in frequency in the remaining three subjects. Other cortical alterations are not usually associated with the typical abnormalities of the posterior fossa in Chiari I malformation; thus, it is possible to hypothesize that cerebral microdysgenesis or, alternatively, a cerebellar dysfunction could underlie epileptogenesis in these patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/29. [11C](R)-PK11195 positron emission tomography imaging of activated microglia in vivo in Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    This study was designed to explore the feasibility of PET using [11C](R)-PK11195 as an in vivo marker of activated microglia/brain macrophages for the assessment of neuroinflammation in Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE). [11C](R)-PK11195 PET was carried out in four normal subjects, two patients with histologically confirmed RE, and three patients with clinically stable hippocampal sclerosis and low seizure frequency. Binding potential maps showing specific binding of [11C](R)-PK11195 were generated for each subject. Regional binding potential values were calculated for anatomically defined regions of interest after coregistration to and spatial transformation into the subjects' own MRI. In one patient with RE who underwent hemispherectomy, the resected, paraffin-embedded brain tissue was stained with an antibody (CR3/43) that labels activated human microglia. Whereas specific binding of [11C](R)-PK11195 in clinically stable hippocampal sclerosis was similar to that in normal brain, patients with RE showed a focal and diffuse increase in binding throughout the affected hemisphere. In RE, [11C](R)-PK11195 PET can reveal in vivo the characteristic, unilateral pattern known from postmortem neuropathologic study. PET imaging of activated microglia/brain macrophages offers a tool for investigation of a range of brain diseases where neuroinflammation is a component and in which conventional MRI does not unequivocally indicate an inflammatory tissue reaction. [11C](R)-PK11195 PET may help in the choice of appropriate biopsy sites and, further, may allow assessment of the efficacy of antiinflammatory disease-modifying treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/29. Childhood epilepsy with neuropsychological regression and continuous spike waves during sleep: epilepsy surgery in a young adult.

    We describe the case of a man with a history of complex partial seizures and severe language, cognitive and behavioural regression during early childhood (3.5 years), who underwent epilepsy surgery at the age of 25 years. His early epilepsy had clinical and electroencephalogram features of the syndromes of epilepsy with continuous spike waves during sleep and acquired epileptic aphasia (landau-kleffner syndrome), which we considered initially to be of idiopathic origin. seizures recurred at 19 years and presurgical investigations at 25 years showed a lateral frontal epileptic focus with spread to Broca's area and the frontal orbital regions. Histopathology revealed a focal cortical dysplasia, not visible on magnetic resonance imaging. The prolonged but reversible early regression and the residual neuropsychological disorders during adulthood were probably the result of an active left frontal epilepsy, which interfered with language and behaviour during development. Our findings raise the question of the role of focal cortical dysplasia as an aetiology in the syndromes of epilepsy with continuous spike waves during sleep and acquired epileptic aphasia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 23.19151665211
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/29. Seizure with prominent tonic initial signs followed by psychomotor features: a case report clinically manifesting an unusual ictal evolution.

    A clinically tonic seizure phase, immediately followed by psychomotor features (right hand dystonic posture, left hand and oral automatisms), was recorded by video and EEG, in a patient who had gliosis of the left temporal lobe and left hippocampal atrophy. Interictal epileptiform discharges were frequently seen in the left temporal area, and at the time of the tonic seizure phase, ictal spike discharges were continuously observed at the left posterior temporal area, which was recognized only by applying a high frequency filter (HFF) of 15 Hz to the digitally recorded EEG because EMG artifacts totally obscured the EEG with a HFF of 60 Hz. It is most likely that tonic seizure can occur in an adult patient with temporal lobe epilepsy, and it is speculated that an epileptogenic focus might activate a certain brain area which is regarded as a symptomatogenic zone for tonic seizures. If the tonic seizure phase is immediately followed by psychomotor features as seen in the present patient, the former could be due to focal epilepsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/29. epilepsia partialis continua in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    OBJECTIVES: We describe a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) with epilepsia partialis continua (EPC) and complex partial seizures. MATERIAL, methods AND RESULTS: The patient presented with semi-rhythmic jerking movements of the right upper extremity. Serial EEG findings showed progressive changes with initial periodic lateralizing epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) on the left hemisphere which evolved into more generalized periodic sharp wave complexes (PSWCs) at later stage. Video-EEG monitoring recorded complex partial seizures originating from the left hemisphere in addition to EPC. CONCLUSIONS: A diagnosis of CJD should be considered when a rapidly progressive dementia is accompanied by abnormal movements. EPC, although rare, may present as an initial manifestation of CJD.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.8652527753516
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/29. Primary neonatal thalamic haemorrhage and epilepsy with continuous spike-wave during sleep: a longitudinal follow-up of a possible significant relation.

    epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during sleep was diagnosed in a child who suffered primary neonatal thalamic haemorrhage, and who was followed from birth to 17 years of age. Early cognitive development was normal. Acquired behavioural problems and cognitive stagnation could be directly related to the epilepsy and not to the initial lesion and posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus. This case and long-term follow-up data on a few children who suffered primary neonatal thalamic haemorrhage suggest that epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during sleep can be a sequel. Disturbances of thalamocortical interactions could play a role in the still poorly understood syndrome of epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during sleep.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 27.056769427461
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/29. Possible oxcarbazepine interaction with cyclosporine serum levels: a single case study.

    We studied the influence of an add-on medication with oxcarbazepine on the cyclosporine trough level in a kidney transplant recipient with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Two weeks after the beginning of the trial we observed a decrease of the cyclosporine trough and the Na serum levels. Both could be corrected by a small-dose reduction of oxcarbazepine, an augmentation of the cyclosporine dosis, and oral sodium chloride substitution. After this episode the cyclosporine trough and the Na serum levels remained stable. Seizure frequency was reduced by 95%. The influence of oxcarbazepine on the cyclosporine serum level has to be studied carefully in other patients after transplantation before the use of oxcarbazepine can be recommended in patients with an immunosuppressive medication with cyclosporine. Our data suggest that oxcarbazepine may be an effective drug with tolerable side effects in this group of patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/29. Intractable epilepsy following radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformation.

    radiosurgery is often used to treat arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) located in deep brain locations. Most of these procedures are successful not only in obliterating the AVM but also in decreasing the frequency and severity of associated seizures. Although radiosurgery is occasionally associated with the development of easy-to-control seizures immediately postoperatively, there have been no reports of intractable epilepsy developing after radiosurgery. In this report, however, a case is presented in which a patient underwent gamma knife surgery (GKS) for an AVM, after which intractable epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) gradually developed. A 37-year-old right-handed woman underwent GKS for a right mesial parietotemporooccipital AVM. One year later, the AVM had reduced in size, but the patient began to experience complex partial seizures (CPSs). These CPSs initially occurred at a frequency of one per month, but 6 months later they were occurring every other week. She also started having secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) once per month. Over the next year the frequency of her seizures gradually increased to several CPSs per day and two to three GTCSs per week, despite treatment with various combinations of antiepileptic drugs. By this time her AVM had decreased to one half of its original size. Video-electroencephalography monitoring demonstrated that both the CPSs and GTCSs were arising from the right posterior quadrant. magnetic resonance imaging revealed not only the presence of the right-sided AVM, but also right-sided MTS. The patient underwent surgical resection of the AVM and right temporal lobectomy. She has been free from seizure for longer than 1 year. radiosurgery may be associated with intractable epilepsy and MTS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/29. Anti-epileptic drugs-induced de novo absence seizures.

    The authors present three patients with de novo absence epilepsy after administration of carbamazepine and vigabatrin. Despite the underlying diseases, the prognosis for drug-induced de novo absence seizure is good because it subsides rapidly after discontinuing the use of the offending drugs. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-transmitted thalamocortical circuitry accounts for a major part of the underlying neurophysiology of the absence epilepsy. Because drug-induced de novo absence seizure is rare, pro-absence drugs can only be considered a promoting factor. The underlying epileptogenecity of the patients or the synergistic effects of the accompanying drugs is required to trigger the de novo absence seizure. The possibility of drug-induced aggravation should be considered whenever an unexpected increase in seizure frequency and/or new seizure types appear following a change in drug treatment. By understanding the underlying mechanism of absence epilepsy, we can avoid the inappropriate use of anticonvulsants in children with epilepsy and prevent drug-induced absence seizures.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Epilepsy, Complex Partial'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.