Cases reported "Epilepsy"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/20. epilepsy--doctor's dilemma, lawyer's delight? Medico-legal consequences of practising in the field of epilepsy report of an International League Against epilepsy British Branch meeting--Edinburgh, April 2000.

    Six cases are described where the medical management of a person's epilepsy was brought under legal scrutiny. Lessons learnt from this educational exercise include improving doctor patient communication, the function of a Coroner's Court, when is misdiagnosis negligent, the vagaries of expert witnesses, should failure to diagnose a tumour be blamed on the physician or the service when facilities are inadequate, is failure to recognise a rare drug interaction, failure to warn against an interaction, or failure to take a proper history, negligent? The conference also examined the legal ramifications of the nurse/doctor relationship in epilepsy care, the place of epilepsy guidelines and, due to its interactive nature, reflected on the audience's epilepsy knowledge, which, in places seemed significantly deficient. It was a gripping educational exercise.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/20. epilepsy--doctor's dilemma, lawyer's delight? Medico-legal consequences of practising in the field of epilepsy report of an International League against epilepsy British Branch meeting--Edinburgh, April 2000.

    Six cases are described where the medical management of a person's epilepsy was brought under legal scrutiny. Lessons learnt from this educational exercise include improving doctor patient communication, the function of a Coroner's Court, when is misdiagnosis negligent, the vagaries of expert witnesses, should failure to diagnose a tumour be blamed on the physician or the service when facilities are inadequate, is failure to recognise a rare drug interaction, failure to warn against an interaction, or failure to take a proper history, negligent? The conference also examined the legal ramifications of the nurse/doctor relationship in epilepsy care, the place of epilepsy guidelines and, due to its interactive nature, reflected on the audience's epilepsy knowledge, which, in places seemed significantly deficient. It was a gripping educational exercise.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/20. Amusia after right frontal resection for epilepsy with singing seizures: case report and review of the literature.

    Although many authors consider aprosodia and amusia to be synonymous, they actually represent two distinct communication disorders. Amusia refers to a profound deficit involving musical abilities, whereas aprosodia refers to deficits regarding the emotional content of speech. Many authors have presumed a similar etiology and localization for these conditions and assumed that these disorders would not occur independently. We report the case of a 31-year-old choir director who developed amusia without aprosodia after a right frontal lobe resection for intractable seizures. His ictal onset manifested with rhythmic slapping of his thighs while communicating with melodic speech. Video EEG monitoring documented right hemispheric discharges that occurred simultaneously with this ictal behavior. While a right frontal lobe resection made him seizure-free, his postoperative amusia was so profound that he could no longer continue his occupation as a choir director. This case suggests that the right frontal cortex has different sites for musical ability distinct from the centers regarding prosody. patients scheduled to undergo right frontal lobectomy ought to be counseled regarding the potential loss of musical abilities.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/20. The significance of ear plugging in localization-related epilepsy.

    PURPOSE: The localizing value of ear plugging in the treatment of auditory onset partial seizures, to our knowledge, has not been previously described. We propose that ear plugging is a clinical response to a sensory seizure manifested as an auditory hallucination and a tool for identifying the seizure focus in the auditory cortex on the superior temporal gyrus. methods: We report on three children who had prior epilepsy surgery for recurrent symptomatic localization-related epilepsy and who, subsequent to their surgery, displayed stereotyped unilateral or bilateral ear plugging at the onset of partial seizures. We studied scalp video electroencephalography (VEEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in all three. Additionally, we used electrocorticography (ECoG) in two patients, intracranial VEEG monitoring in one patient, and functional MRI language mapping in two patients. RESULTS: All three patients plugged their ears with their hands during auditory auras that localized to the superior temporal gyrus and were followed by partial seizures that spread to a wider field, as shown on scalp and intracranial VEEG. All three patients had MEG interictal discharges in the superior temporal gyrus. One patient who was nonverbal and unable to describe an auditory phenomenon plugged the ear contralateral to where temporal lobe-onset seizures and MEG interictal discharges occurred. CONCLUSIONS; ear-plugging seizures indicate an auditory aura and may also lateralize seizure onset to the contralateral temporal lobe auditory cortex. Stereotyped behaviors accompanied by epileptic seizures in children who have poor communication skills are important in the seizure semiology of localization-related epilepsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/20. bradycardia and sinus arrest following saline irrigation of the brain during epilepsy surgery.

    Adverse cardiac events during the intraoperative period are life-threatening. The authors report three episodes of severe bradycardia and sinus arrest that occurred in a patient undergoing anterior temporal lobectomy and amygdalo-hippocampectomy for the treatment of epilepsy. The first episode occurred during resection of the amygdala; the other two episodes were observed during subsequent irrigation of the exposed brain structures, most likely the brain stem structures, because of a rent that the surgeon had deliberately made into the basilar cistern for better anatomic appreciation of the structures to be excised. The patient responded well to treatment with no adverse outcomes. The probable mechanisms leading to this event are discussed; the authors excluded insular cortex stimulation, the effects of the anesthetic drugs used, and venous air embolism as a cause of bradycardia and sinus arrest. The amygdala resection was the most likely cause of the first episode of bradycardia; the second episode of bradycardia and sinus arrest occurred because of inadvertent stimulation of brain structures by the high temperature (42 degree C) of the saline used for irrigation. To counter its effects, saline irrigation at room temperature (20 degree C) was started, and this caused the third episode of bradycardia, most likely because of "temperature shock" of the exposed brain. Prompt communication with the surgical team and vigilance are crucial for the appropriate management of such an incident, which may pose a threat to life. Avoiding irrigation of the exposed brain with high-temperature saline may prevent such an incident.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/20. Neuroendoscopic management of symptomatic septum pellucidum cysts.

    OBJECTIVE: Ten rare cases of symptomatic septum pellucidum cysts in patients who underwent endoscopic fenestration are described. The approaches and techniques used in the management of these cysts and the endoscopic surgical indications are discussed. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: In the past 5 years, 10 patients (age range, 3-60 yr) with symptomatic septum pellucidum cysts underwent neuroendoscopic fenestration. The most common symptom was intermittent headache (seven patients) accompanied by dizziness, vomiting, and epileptic seizures. Two patients presented with epileptic seizures. One patient presented with abnormally increased head circumference. magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 patients showed septum pellucidum cysts, two with hydrocephalus, and two with pituitary microadenoma. INTERVENTION: All 10 patients underwent endoscopic fenestration with a rigid endoscope via a frontal approach. Eight cases were performed freehand. Two cases were assisted by a frameless neuronavigation system. Postoperatively, the mass effect of the cysts and the symptoms resolved immediately, and computed tomographic or magnetic resonance imaging scans showed significant decrease in the cyst size and no recurrence during follow-up. Ventricular sizes in the two patients with hydrocephalus were normal. CONCLUSION: Neuroendoscopic pellucidotomy could be an effective, safe, and convenient therapeutic method for symptomatic septum pellucidum cysts. This approach might provide communication between the cyst and the ventricular system, thus avoiding shunting or craniotomy. We consider that it is appropriate to use the rigid endoscope via the frontal approach. It is helpful to fill the ventricles with lactated Ringer's solution and leave an external drain after surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/20. Diagnostic and management considerations of acquired epileptic aphasia or landau-kleffner syndrome.

    A small number of children have been identified as having an interruption in their communicative progress known as landau-kleffner syndrome, acquired epileptic aphasia, or aphasia with convulsive disorder. Although presenting symptoms have differed among the cases reported, a progressive or acute language loss and inattentiveness to auditory stimuli are the most common manifestations. Typically, these children begin developing language normally and then, for no apparent reason, language progress is disrupted. This disruption is accompanied by the onset of seizure activity and/or abnormal electroencephalographic (EEG) findings. While this disorder appears to be relatively uncommon, its frequency is questionable due to its unfamiliarity among the audiology and otology communities and, thus, it is subject to the likelihood of misdiagnosis. A case of acquired epileptic aphasia is described herein. A team diagnostic and management approach, which can include audiology, otology, psychology, neurology, and speech-language pathology is recommended for such cases. Earlier identification of this debilitating disorder is needed in order to secure appropriate intervention and reestablish communication systems for these children.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/20. corpus callosum stimulation and stereotactic callosotomy in the management of refractory generalized epilepsy. Preliminary communication.

    corpus callosum stimulation produced by chronically implanted electrodes, placed either by craniotomy or stereotactically, failed to control refractory generalized epilepsy in humans and also in experimentally produced penicillin epilepsy in cats. However, the patients that suffered craniotomy, frontal lobe retraction or pneumoencephalograms, without callosal section, showed remarkable improvement of their seizure condition due to these unspecific manipulation effects. Stereotactic anterior callosotomy emerged as a sequel of these functional neurosurgical findings, and as an alternative procedure to preclude undesirable neuropsychological and neurological side effects of split brain syndrome and of brain retraction, associated to conventional callosotomy. Ten patients with various disabling convulsive disorders have undergone this new operation, which showed to be less traumatic and better tolerated than open callosotomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/20. Otologic manifestations of the hydantoin syndrome.

    The temporal bones of a newborn infant with hydantoin syndrome showed multiple middle ear and inner ear anomalies. There was a constellation of bony and membranous defects involving the oval and round windows, cochlear ducts, cochlear aqueducts, endolymphatic ducts and sacs, and vestibular labyrinths. To the authors' knowledge, supernumerary vestibular sensory epithelial structures and an inner ear epidermoid cyst have not been previously reported. Wide communications between the subarachnoid space and inner ear were of surgical relevance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/20. reading epilepsy.

    This is a report of a 21-year-old woman with reading epilepsy. Clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) observations are presented while the patient read a news magazine in Spanish, read a magazine in English, read an announcement repetitively, viewed comic strips without legends, made a mathematical calculation. Only reading in Spanish produced clinical and EEG paroxysms. This case report supports the "communication" hypothesis as opposed to hypotheses that emphasize proprioceptive and other "lower order" stimuli in evoking seizures while reading.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Epilepsy'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.