Cases reported "Erysipelothrix Infections"

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1/8. fatal outcome of erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a patient with oropharyngeal cancer.

    bacteremia due to erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is rare; the most common presentation reported in the literature is endocarditis. We report a 32-year-old man with oropharyngeal cancer who developed aspiration pneumonia and E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia, and presented with fever, chills, dyspnea, and productive cough with purulent sputum. Despite treatment with amoxicillin/clavulanate and nutritional support for 9 days, he died of respiratory failure. He had no clinical evidence of endocarditis. He had no history of animal or occupational exposure, and might have been colonized with E. rhusiopathiae in the oral cavity, followed by aspiration pneumonia and bacteremia. A fatal outcome in a patient with bacteremia due to E. rhusiopathiae without endocarditis is rare.
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2/8. erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis: a preventable zoonosis?

    BACKGROUND: erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a bacterium ubiquitous in the environment. It can cause a variety of diseases and the risk of infection is closely related to the level of occupational exposure to infected or colonised animals. AIMS: To discuss the clinical features and treatment of this zoonosis, to increase awareness of this pathogen and to emphasise the need for meticulous attention to hygienic work practices in reducing the risk of infection. METHOD: A case report of a farmer with E. rhusiopathiae endocarditis and the management of the infection. RESULTS: The patient was successfully treated with valve replacement surgery and antimicrobial therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Early identification of this microorganism is essential for appropriate treatment of endocarditis. Greater awareness and safe work practices can help reduce the risk of human infection by this microorganism.
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3/8. Subacute endocarditis due to erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a rare cause of endocarditis. Most cases were observed in people working with animals. We report a case in a 45-year old man without any exposure to animals. He was admitted to our hospital because of dyspnoea. blood cultures were drawn following fever on day 8 of hospitalisation. erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae was cultured and echocardiography showed a vegetation on the mitral valve. Appropriate antibiotic therapy and surgical treatment led to a good outcome of the infection.
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4/8. Visceral botryomycosis in a case of erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis.

    Botryomycosis is a rare bacterial infection of the skin and, rarely, viscera that is characterized by the formation of characteristic hyaline grains. We encountered a patient with erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis who developed visceral botryomycosis. He was a 54-year-old black man who presented in sepsis with a history of progressive weakness and severe weight loss. He died 10 hours after admission. At autopsy, endocarditis was identified, along with infarcts of the spleen and kidneys. Microscopically, visceral botryomycosis was seen. With these bacteria, an animal source is usually identified, although one was not found in this man. erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is an organism that is becoming identified in a range of infections in humans, the manifestations and pathophysiology of which are still being discovered.
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5/8. Mitro-aortic infective endocarditis produced by erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae: case report and review of the literature.

    endocarditis produced by erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is an uncommon disease in humans. This bacterial species is found worldwide as a commensal or a pathogen in many animals. Infection in humans is usually due to occupational exposure. The case is reported of a 43-year-old male parrot breeder with native aortic and mitral valve endocarditis and NYHA class II heart failure at six months after wound infection. The patient was discharged after six weeks' treatment with intravenous penicillin g and replacement of the mitral and aortic valves due to severe regurgitation. At one year after surgery the patient was asymptomatic and infection-free.
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6/8. erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis: microbiologic, epidemiologic, and clinical features of an occupational disease.

    Ninety percent of the 49 reported cases of serious erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection have been episodes of presumed or proved endocarditis. E. rhusiopathiae endocarditis correlates highly with occupation (farming, animal exposure), affects more males than females, exhibits a peculiar aortic valve tropism, displays a characteristic erysipeloid cutaneous lesion (in 40% of cases), and is associated with significant mortality (overall rate, 38%). Comparison with other unusual gram-positive rods causing endocarditis shows that E. rhusiopathiae resembles listeria monocytogenes and lactobacillus species in its propensity to involve structurally damaged but native left-sided valves. Unlike diphtheroid endocarditis, E. rhusiopathiae endocarditis has not involved prosthetic valves and is not associated with intravenous drug abuse, as is Bacillus species endocarditis. E. rhusiopathiae is exquisitely susceptible to penicillin but resistant to vancomycin. Since vancomycin is often employed in empiric therapy for presumed endocarditis, prompt microbiologic differentiation of E. rhusiopathiae from other gram-positive organisms is necessary to avoid delays in the initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy.
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7/8. Persistent bacteremia with erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a hospitalized patient.

    A patient with a history of alcohol abuse and pancreatitis presented with a pleural effusion resulting from a fistula between the pancreatic duct and left pleural space. Two weeks into her hospitalization, fever and persistent bloodstream infection with erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae and candida albicans developed. The patient had no history of exposure to animals. To our knowledge this is the first report of an E. rhusiopathiae infection presenting during hospitalization. This case suggests the possibility of a carrier state of infection and illustrates that a high index of suspicion is necessary for identification of unusual pathogens in hospitalized patients.
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8/8. erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae: an uncommon but ever present zoonosis.

    erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is an important animal pathogen with a worldwide distribution, yet this zoonotic infection is rarely reported in humans. Three cases of E. rhusiopathiae infection, which illustrate the varied clinical presentations of this pathogen in humans, are presented together with the pathological findings and treatment regimens.
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