Cases reported "Esophageal Atresia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/62. Successful treatment of tracheomalacia associated with esophageal atresia without a tracheoesophageal fistula by aortopexy: report of a case.

    tracheomalacia (TM) is well known as a complication associated with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF); however, the occurrence of TM requiring surgical treatment in a patient having EA without a tracheoesophageal fistula has never been reported. We describe herein a rare case of TM associated with EA without TEF. Respiratory distress was caused by compression of the trachea by a severely dilated upper esophageal pouch with weakness of the tracheal wall. Aortopexy was performed, and an excellent postoperative result was achieved.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/62. Esophageal lung with multiple congenital anomalies: conundrums in diagnosis and management.

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformations (CBPFM) are a diverse group of potentially devastating congenital anomalies with anatomy that may be difficult to delineate. The authors present a case that illustrates conundrums in the diagnosis and management of these complex disorders. methods: A term baby had esophageal atresia (EA), tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and tetralogy of fallot. Initially, a gastrostomy was performed, and a balloon catheter was inserted through the endotracheal tube to occlude the fistula until the patient was hemodynamically stable. Subsequently, the fistula was ligated. Postoperatively, the left lung collapsed, and bronchoscopy showed an atretic left mainstem bronchus. Repeat thoracotomy showed that the fistula ligation was intact. air was introduced through the gastrostomy tube, and, surprisingly, the left lung inflated, indicating the left mainstem bronchus arose from the esophagus distal to the ligated TEF. RESULTS: Despite reopening this fistula, ventilation remained poor, and support was withdrawn. autopsy findings confirmed a unilobed left lung arising from the esophagus, EA, TEF, an atretic left mainstem bronchus, tetralogy of fallot, and digeorge syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of a combination of EA and distal TEF with a second CBPFM involving the esophagus and the entire left lung. Successful correction of these anomalies will require extensive delineation of the anatomy to plan an operative strategy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/62. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung associated with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula.

    Bronchopulmonary malformations associated with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) are extremely rare. The authors describe a case of type II congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) of the right lower lobe associated with EA and TEF (Vogt-Gross type C) in a full-term female infant. The CCAM presented as an incidental radiologic finding, and a contralateral tension pneumothorax developed shortly after surgical repair of the EA. Early recognition of this rare association is essential for correct operative management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/62. esophageal atresia: primary repair of a rare long gap variant involving distal pouch mobilization.

    This report describes a rare type IIIb variant of long gap pure esophageal atresia treated with delayed primary repair. Preoperative imaging showed a distal pouch with a unusually long tapering end, and a 5-vertebral body gap. Delayed exploration with mobilization of the distal pouch allowed for successful primary repair without the need of myotomy. The characteristic radiological appearance of this rare variant enables its preoperative recognition and warrants attempting primary repair with a good expectation of success.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/62. Chyloperitoneum: a postoperative complication after repair of tracheoesophageal fistula.

    Chyloperitoneum is rare condition that can occur in response to various pathologic process. The authors described a newborn baby who had chyloperitoneum after primary surgical repair of esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (Gross type C). This probably resulted from iatrogenic damage of the thoracic duct during ligation of azygous vein resulting in leaking lacteal within the intestinal wall. Biochemical analysis of ascitic fluid, plasma, and milk formula for triglyceride and cholesterol level can differentiate neonatal gastric intestinal perforation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/62. A new variant of esophageal atresia associated with esophageal heterotopic pancreas.

    An infant with esophageal atresia (EA) and absence of gas on abdominal radiographs was found to have an obliterated distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Preoperative bronchoscopy and surgical exploration found that the reason for gasless abdomen was the atresia of the distal portion of lower esophagus, which also contained heterotopic pancreatic tissue. The type of trachea/esophageal anomaly found in this patient, with the association of esophageal heterotopic pancreas (EHP), has not yet been reported in the literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/62. Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula and tracheoesophageal fistula with esophageal atresia.

    A case of initial esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula in a female newborn, later complicated by pneumonia and a second bronchoesophageal fistula, is reported. She was treated surgically by closure of the tracheoesophageal fistula and by end-to-end esophago-esophageal anastomosis. An esophagram at 1 month of age was normal. Three months later she developed severe, persistent right lower lobe pneumonia that required intensive antibiotic therapy and respiratory support. Esophagography was repeated and revealed a second fistula between the right main-stem bronchus and the lower esophagus. The bronchoesophageal fistula was repaired, and a right lower lobectomy was performed. Postoperative recovery was uncomplicated. Histologic examination indicated that the fistula was congenital in origin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a congenital bronchoesophageal fistula coexisting with a tracheoesophageal fistula and esophageal atresia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/62. Costal cartilage grafting for repair of a recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula in a 1.6-kg baby with esophageal atresia.

    A large intraoperative tracheal tear occurred during correction of a type III esophageal atresia in a 1,630-g premature baby. It was repaired by primary suture. recurrence of the tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) was treated operatively with esophageal exclusion and costal cartilage grafting (CCG) onto the tracheal defect. At 3 months of age, successful esophageal reconstruction was performed using a posterior mediastinal colonic interposition. On 27-month follow-up, the child was symptom-free and thriving. Surgical options for TEF recurrence and intraoperative management of the tracheal air leak are discussed. CCG is advocated as an attractive material for tracheal repair even in low-weight prematures.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/62. Collis-Nissen procedure in patients with esophageal atresia: long-term evaluation.

    A subset of patients with esophageal atresia (EA) have an associated short esophagus and require an antireflux procedure. The Collis-Nissen procedure, which consists of a combination of Collis gastroplasty and Nissen fundoplication, is considered an option in such conditions. The long-term results of EA patients undergoing this procedure have rarely been reported. The results of the Collis-Nissen procedure were examined in four EA patients with follow-up for an average of 9 years. The Collis-Nissen procedure was conducted concurrently with segmental esophageal resection for an associated congenital esophageal stenosis close to the esophagogastric junction in two postoperative Gross type C patients (7 months, 2 years), as an antireflux operation in a postoperative Gross type A patient with an unreducible sliding hiatal hernia (10 years), and with primary repair of EA in a Gross type A patient with a long gap (4 months). There were no significant complications except minor anastomotic leakage and an anastomotic stenosis that required postoperative dilation. Significant reflux was negative, as shown by an upper gastrointestinal study and scintigraphy. Limited esophagitis just above the esophagogastric junction was observed in a Gross type A patient with a long mediastinal gastric segment. Swallow-related pressure reduction at the wrapping cuff was detected by manometric examination. The Collis-Nissen procedure is a useful option for treating EA patients who require esophageal lengthening and control of gastroesophageal reflux.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/62. Delayed blind-pouch apposition, guide wire placement, and nonoperative establishment of luminal continuity in a child with long gap esophageal atresia.

    Delayed primary esophago-esophagostomy is the most physiologically attractive approach to establish luminal continuity in children with pure esophageal atresia. However, excessive tension on the mobilized esophageal ends can lead to anastomotic separation and severe leakage. To circumvent these complications, the blind pouches of a 2(1/2)-month-old child were approximated unopened when, during the extrapleural thoracotomy, a conventional anastomosis was not feasible. A suture was passed through the tip of the 2 ends and made to exit through the mouth and the gastrostomy. After healing occurred, the suture was replaced under fluoroscopic control by a Seldinger-type wire. A vein dilator then was passed over the wire, establishing the continuity between the esophageal segments. Subsequent dilatations increased the anastomosis to the desired diameter. Leakage and an additional thoracotomy were avoided, and the hospital stay was shortened. The child, now 6 years old, is well and swallows normally.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Esophageal Atresia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.