Cases reported "Esophageal Diseases"

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1/143. Dissecting intramural haematoma of the oesophagus.

    The largest series of patients (n = 10) with dissecting intramural haematoma of the oesophagus is described. The typical features, chest pain with odynophagia or dysphagia and minor haematemesis are usually present but not always elicited at presentation. If elicited, these symptoms should suggest the diagnosis and avoid mistaken attribution to a cardiac origin for the pain. precipitating factors such as a forced Valsalva manoeuvre cannot be identified in at least half the cases. Early endoscopy is safe, and confirms the diagnosis when an haematoma within the oesophageal wall or the later appearances of a longitudinal ulcer are seen. Dissecting intramural haematoma of the oesophagus has an excellent prognosis when managed conservatively.
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keywords = dysphagia
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2/143. Thoracoscopic excision with mini-thoracotomy for a bronchogenic cyst of the esophagus.

    A 19 year-old man with a history of dysphagia and chest pain was diagnosed as having a cyst of the esophagus by endoscopic ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient's bronchogenic cyst was treated by video-assisted thoracoscopic excision with mini-thoracotomy. This procedure is applicable for patients who require repair of the esophageal wall after excision of a lesion and reduces post-operative complications.
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keywords = dysphagia
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3/143. Management of postfundoplication complications.

    The role of surgical therapy in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) continues to evolve in the laparoscopic era. As the number of surgical procedures increases, so does the number of patients with postfundoplication complications. The most effective strategy is to prevent the complication in the first place. patients who are most likely to have trouble after surgery are those with refractory, atypical, or complicated disease. Gastroenterologists should take care to make an accurate diagnosis, heal the esophagitis, and dilate any strictures before sending a patient to surgery. The surgeon should be a skilled laparoscopist. In patients with complicated GERD, the surgeon must be able to recognize severe disease and perform advanced procedures. Postoperatively, symptoms are usually the same (suggesting a failure of the operation or incorrect original diagnosis) or different (suggesting a complication) than before surgery. Most patients should have a barium swallow and an endoscopy to evaluate the integrity of the wrap. If intact, postoperative heartburn and dysphagia will usually resolve with conservative therapy. If the fundoplication is poorly oriented, too long, too tight, twisted, or herniated above the diaphragm, surgical revision is often necessary.
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keywords = dysphagia
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4/143. Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the esophagus.

    Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the esophagus (SIHE) is a rare condition, usually presenting with severe acute chest pain. vomiting, dysphagia, odynophagia, and hematemesis may appear later. We herein report a case of this disease in a patient treated with low doses of aspirin, and review the literature for possible etiologies for this condition. In addition, we compare the utility of the various diagnostic modalities in this uncommon condition.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dysphagia
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5/143. Esophago-gastric invagination in patients with sliding hiatus hernia.

    intussusception of the distal esophagus into a reducible hiatus hernia is described in nine female and three male patients. The main radiographic feature is demonstration of a lobulated fundal mass of changeable size and configuration surrounding the narrowed distal esophageal segment. This pseudotumor is produced by inversion of the hiatus hernia into the stomach, and may be mistaken for a neoplasm. Disinvagination invariably occurs when maneuvers directed toward demonstration of a sliding hernia are utilized during upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy. It is emphasized that esophago-gastric invagination frequently accounts for masses shown in the cardia of older women with intermittent dysphagia and crampy epigastric pain.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dysphagia
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6/143. Treatment of severe esophageal Crohn's disease with infliximab.

    Esophageal ulceration with fistula is an uncommon manifestation of Crohn's disease. Typical presentation of symptomatic esophageal Crohn's disease may include dysphagia, odynophagia, weight loss, and chest discomfort. We present a patient with severe esophageal and skin involvement of Crohn's disease that was progressive despite conventional therapy including prednisone and 6-mercaptopurine. The diagnosis of Crohn's was based on the presence of typical clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic findings, including granulomas in the skin ulcer and the absence of infectious etiologies. The patient had a nearly complete resolution of her esophageal disease with a single infusion of infliximab.
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keywords = dysphagia
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7/143. Ectopic gastric mucosa causing dysphagia due to strictures in a boy.

    Ectopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus has been reported previously in neonatal autopsy series and encountered in adult esophagoscopies. Despite the usual asymptomatic course of the disease, symptomatic adults have been reported. However there is no report of a symptomatic child with ectopic gastric mucosa in the literature. A 12-year-old boy presenting with dysphagia due to strictures resulting from circular patches of ectopic gastric mucosa located in the mid esophagus is reported.
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ranking = 5
keywords = dysphagia
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8/143. Oesophageal lichen planus.

    We present a case of lichen planus affecting the oesophagus of an 80-year-old woman. Symptomatically, the lesions manifested themselves as dysphagia requiring repeated oesophageal dilatations. The patient was unable to tolerate several conventional treatments and so pulsed methylprednisolone was given with some beneficial short-term effects. Due to potential for malignant change in lichen planus of the mucous membranes it is important to remember this complication and investigate patients with oesophageal symptoms.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dysphagia
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9/143. The beneficial effect of mesalazine on esophageal ulcers in intestinal Behcet's disease.

    Intestinal Behcet's disease in a 19-year-old girl was diagnosed because of the history of recurrent oral aphthous ulcers and typical endoscopic findings of esophageal and ileal ulcers. Her symptoms (e.g., dysphagia and retrosternal pain) were gradually relieved by treatment with prednisolone and total parenteral nutrition. However, about one month later, oral and esophageal ulcers appeared again. Mesalazine was added. Oral and esophageal ulcers healed promptly, and have not relapsed for about one year. Although mesalazine appears to act locally in the small intestine and colon, the therapeutic effect of mesalazine in this case may be explained by the systemic antiinflammatory effect. This case suggests that mesalazine is an effective drug and is a good candidate in the treatment of intestinal Behcet's disease, especially accompanied with esophageal involvement.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dysphagia
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10/143. Esophageal lichen planus: case report and review of the literature.

    Involvement of the esophagus by lichen planus is a rarely reported condition. The histologic features of esophageal lichen planus, which may differ from those of cutaneous disease, have only rarely been illustrated. We describe a 58-year-old woman with skin and oral lichen planus who presented with dysphagia and an esophageal stricture that were ultimately diagnosed as esophageal lichen planus. Multiple esophageal biopsies demonstrated a lichenoid, T cell-rich lymphocytic infiltrate, along with degeneration of the basal epithelium and Civatte bodies. Correct diagnosis of esophageal lichen planus is critical because of its prognostic and therapeutic distinction from other more common causes of esophagitis and stricture formation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dysphagia
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