Cases reported "Esophageal Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/12. Dissecting intramural haematoma of the oesophagus.

    The largest series of patients (n = 10) with dissecting intramural haematoma of the oesophagus is described. The typical features, chest pain with odynophagia or dysphagia and minor haematemesis are usually present but not always elicited at presentation. If elicited, these symptoms should suggest the diagnosis and avoid mistaken attribution to a cardiac origin for the pain. precipitating factors such as a forced Valsalva manoeuvre cannot be identified in at least half the cases. Early endoscopy is safe, and confirms the diagnosis when an haematoma within the oesophageal wall or the later appearances of a longitudinal ulcer are seen. Dissecting intramural haematoma of the oesophagus has an excellent prognosis when managed conservatively.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/12. Spontaneous intramural dissection of the oesophagus.

    Spontaneous intramural dissection or intramural haematoma of the oesophagus is an unusual condition and has been recognised as a separate clinical entity. The commonest presenting symptoms are chest pain, dysphagia and haematemesis usually affecting women in their sixties and seventies. Conservative management is usually thought to be adequate. We present a case of spontaneous intramural dissection in an elderly male who did not respond to conservative management and died.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/12. Fatal aortoesophageal fistula in two cases of tight vascular ring.

    Vascular rings are rare vascular congenital anomalies causing oesophageal and tracheal compression. An aortoesophageal fistula is a devastating, in part iatrogenic, complication of vascular rings. It is seen with increasing frequency, and can be misleading, since differential diagnosis with other causes of haematemesis and melaena is often difficult, especially in infants. We report two infants with aortoesophageal fistulas secondary to double aortic arches forming a vascular ring. In both, the diagnosis was missed, and massive haemorrhage led to death. In both cases, the fissuration on the oesophageal and aortic sides of the fistula had sharp edges, highly suggestive of an iatrogenic laceration caused by manipulation of nasogastric tubes. The key for the diagnosis of vascular rings is, therefore, clinical suspicion and awareness of this condition. Prompt identification in infants with stridor, wheezing, or respiratory distress can prevent prolonged intubation, thus avoiding the formation of an aortoesophageal fistula and hopefully preventing a fatal outcome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/12. Two cases of submucosal haematoma of the oesophagus and Mallory-Weiss tear.

    Submucosal haematoma of the oesophagus is an uncommon condition which may be under-recognised. Presentation may be with chest pain, dysphagia or haematemesis. endoscopy, CT scan, barium meal or a combination of these modalities makes the diagnosis. Most patients make a full recovery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/12. Fatal haematemesis due to benign retrosternal goitre.

    The development of a goitre in the retrosternal space may result in many different symptoms due to local compression. We describe a case in which such a goitre resulted in full-thickness ulceration of the oesophagus, which presented as a fatal haematemesis. We believe that such a complication has not been previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/12. Oesophageal haematoma and associated Mallory-Weiss tear.

    Intramural oesophageal haematoma is a rare condition that may present as vomiting or haematemesis. Mallory-Weiss tear has been proposed as a possible aetiology but the evidence to support this is circumstantial. A case of oesophageal haematoma associated with evidence of Mallory-Weiss tear on endoscopy that helps to support this hypothesis is presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/12. Oesophageal haematoma: report of three cases.

    Three cases of intramural haematoma of the oesophagus are reported. Two cases mimicked benign neoplasms of the distal oesophagus. One of these resembled a polypoid tumour; the other occurred in a patient with known achalasia. Two cases presented with chest pain and haematemesis, the third presented with dysphagia and odynophagia only. One case was truly spontaneous and two cases were thought to be secondary to trauma from food.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/12. Spontaneous intramural oesophageal haematoma.

    Six cases of spontaneous submucosal dissection of the oesophagus are described. This rare entity should be considered in patients presenting with chest pain, usually of sudden onset, associated with dysphagia and haematemesis. barium swallow or endoscopy are needed to confirm the diagnosis and the characteristic features are described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/12. Spontaneous intramural oesophageal perforation.

    Spontaneous intramural oesophageal perforation appears at any level, but preferably on the posterior wall, and is usually longitudinal. Unlike the Mallory Weiss and the Boerhaave syndromes, females are more frequently affected. It appears with sudden retrosternal pain radiating to the epigastrium, neck and back, followed by haematemesis of small quantity and dysphagia. vomiting is rare. In contrast to complete rupture, neither pneumomediastinum nor emphysema is observed, barium swallow being the diagnostic test of choice whenever this pathology is suspected. However, when the symptoms are not typical, endoscopy is a useful method for diagnosis. Treatment must be conservative, while surgery is suggested in the case of recurrent symptoms or big intramural haematomas with a high risk of perforation. A 74-year-old woman is presented. endoscopy was performed as an emergency in suspected food impaction in the oesophagus. This case was diagnosed as spontaneous intramural oesophageal perforation. The patient also presented with oesophageal diverticulum and hiatal hernia. Conservative treatment was given, and the lesion cured.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/12. Healing of malignant ulceration in a case of early oesophageal carcinoma presenting as haematemesis.

    A 77-year-old male was hospitalised following haematemesis of sudden onset. Emergency endoscopy revealed an oesophageal ulcer 5 cms in length. Biopsies taken from the margin of this lesion showed severe dysplastic changes. The patient was seen one month later, at which time his general condition was good, and there was no dysphagia. A second endoscopy showed that the ulcer had healed, and in its place was found a mucous plaque which was redder than normal. This plaque was iodonegative. Biopsies taken from this region confirmed a diagnosis of carcinoma in situ of the oesophagus. To our knowledge this is the first recorded case in which a malignant ulcer has healed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Esophageal Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.