Cases reported "Esophageal Diseases"

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1/57. Thoracoscopic excision with mini-thoracotomy for a bronchogenic cyst of the esophagus.

    A 19 year-old man with a history of dysphagia and chest pain was diagnosed as having a cyst of the esophagus by endoscopic ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient's bronchogenic cyst was treated by video-assisted thoracoscopic excision with mini-thoracotomy. This procedure is applicable for patients who require repair of the esophageal wall after excision of a lesion and reduces post-operative complications.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/57. Management of postfundoplication complications.

    The role of surgical therapy in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) continues to evolve in the laparoscopic era. As the number of surgical procedures increases, so does the number of patients with postfundoplication complications. The most effective strategy is to prevent the complication in the first place. patients who are most likely to have trouble after surgery are those with refractory, atypical, or complicated disease. Gastroenterologists should take care to make an accurate diagnosis, heal the esophagitis, and dilate any strictures before sending a patient to surgery. The surgeon should be a skilled laparoscopist. In patients with complicated GERD, the surgeon must be able to recognize severe disease and perform advanced procedures. Postoperatively, symptoms are usually the same (suggesting a failure of the operation or incorrect original diagnosis) or different (suggesting a complication) than before surgery. Most patients should have a barium swallow and an endoscopy to evaluate the integrity of the wrap. If intact, postoperative heartburn and dysphagia will usually resolve with conservative therapy. If the fundoplication is poorly oriented, too long, too tight, twisted, or herniated above the diaphragm, surgical revision is often necessary.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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3/57. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus ("inlet patch"): a rare cause of esophageal perforation.

    We report the case of a 21-yr-old woman who presented with a perforation of an upper esophageal ulcer on a patch of gastric-type mucosa. Despite surgical closure of the perforation and reinforcement with a pleuro-muscular flap the patient developed an esophageal leakage and died in the postoperative period. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus is usually an asymptomatic abnormality, discovered incidentally during endoscopic studies carried out for some other reason; however, complications secondary to the inlet patch acid secreting capacity can arise, and this has to be kept in mind to elude life-threatening conditions.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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4/57. Crohn's disease of the esophagus: report of a case.

    We report herein the case of a 27-year-old man with Crohn's disease of the esophagus. The patient presented with large ulcers in the esophagus for which treatment based on a diagnosis of reflux esophagitis was commenced. Although his symptoms were initially resolved, the ulcers did not improve and he was readmitted to hospital 3 months later for progressive heartburn. An esophagoscopy revealed large ulcers in the esophagus, and a colonoscopy revealed a longitudinal ulcer in the terminal ileum. Histological examination of specimens from the terminal ileum showed severe inflammation without granuloma formation, which led to a diagnosis of Crohn's disease. The oral administration of prednisolone and salazosulfapyridine controlled his symptoms and the esophageal ulcers were observed to be healing 2 weeks after this treatment was initiated. A review of the English literature revealed only 77 cases of this disease. Isolated esophageal lesions were reported in ten patients (13.0%), none of which were able to be diagnosed as Crohn's disease preoperatively. Ileocolic lesions developed after esophageal lesions in only five patients (6.5%) including ours. In the remaining 62 patients (80.5%), ileocolic lesions had existed synchronous with or prior to the esophageal lesions. This suggests that ileocolic lesions may often coexist in Crohn's patients with esophageal lesions, and that examination of the terminal ileum must be performed to confirm a diagnosis of Crohn's disease of the esophagus.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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5/57. Oesophageal rupture in a patient with postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    rupture of the oesophagus (Boerhaave's syndrome) is a rare complication of forceful or suppressed vomiting. postoperative nausea and vomiting is common but does not usually lead to life-threatening complications. A case of oesophageal rupture in a man who experienced postoperative nausea and vomiting after an uncomplicated procedure is described in this report. delayed diagnosis mandated conservative treatment. The clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of oesophageal rupture is discussed.
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ranking = 6
keywords = operative
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6/57. Esophageal tubular duplication complicated with intraluminal hematoma: a case report.

    Esophageal tubular duplication is a rare congenital anomaly. We experienced a patient with esophageal tubular duplication who presented with a swallowing difficulty which was aggravated after a gastrofiberscopic examination. Preoperative diagnosis was intramural hematoma of the esophagus due to trauma caused by endoscopy. Surgical specimen revealed that hematoma was located within a duplicated lumen of the esophagus. The radiologic and endoscopic findings are discussed in correlation with its pathology.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/57. Preexisting gastric carcinoid in a gastro-omental free flap.

    The authors present a 72-year-old man with an extensive medical history including stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the right pyriform sinus diagnosed approximately 10 years before this report. They were asked to evaluate the patient for esophageal reconstruction after local radiation had led to benign stricture of his esophagus and subsequent development of a large, draining esophagocutaneous fistula. A gastro-omental free flap reconstruction of the esophagus and overlying skin defect was complicated by the intraoperative diagnosis of gastric carcinoid obtained from several polyps noticed on the gastric mucosa on routine inspection. This case report signifies the importance of close inspection of all free tissue transfers before interposition. Failure to do so could result in disastrous outcomes.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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8/57. Complications related to hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer in anterior cervical spine surgery.

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a report of complications related to the hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer used for anterior cervical reconstructive surgery. Compression of the spinal cord by broken fragments of hydroxyapatite spacer as well as its surrounding radiolucent clear zone were observed in seven patients. OBJECTIVES: To report complications related to the use of hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer for anterior cervical reconstructive surgery and to discuss how to prevent these complications. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Despite previous articles reporting the clinical applications of hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer for the cervical spine, clinical reports regarding the long-term results of hydroxyapatite spacer for anterior cervical surgery and its complications have been limited. methods: The authors reviewed patients who underwent anterior reconstructive surgery using the hydroxyapatite spacer at other hospitals and had postoperative complications related to hydroxyapatite spacer. RESULTS: Seven patients previously treated by anterior cervical spine surgery using the hydroxyapatite vertebral spacer were referred to the authors because of unsatisfactory surgical outcomes. All the patients had a radiolucent clear zone around the spacer and experienced severe neck pain. Four had fracture of the hydroxyapatite spacer, and two had compression of the spinal cord by retropulsed fragments of broken hydroxyapatite spacers. CONCLUSIONS: Although hydroxyapatite has been used in many medical fields because of its bioactive characteristics, its mechanical properties should be improved to lessen the risks of breakage and subsequent spinal cord compression. Gentle insertion maneuvers are also important to avoid the production of cracks inside the spacer.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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9/57. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the esophagus.

    Inflammatory pseudotumors of the esophagus are uncommon. They pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas, especially when located in the cervical esophagus. history and physical examination are rarely contributory. Routine radiologic investigations including barium swallow and computed tomography only raise the suspicion of a benign esophageal neoplasm. esophagoscopy and biopsy do not provide a definite diagnosis, as these 'tumors' are frequently submucosal, unless they enlarge sufficiently to cause mucosal ulcerations. Endoscopic ultrasonography may accurately localize the tumor but is not diagnostic. Conservative surgical resection or debulking would be both diagnostic and therapeutic. steroids, cyclophosphamide and low-dose radiotherapy may at best be considered second-line therapy. One such case of inflammatory pseudotumor of the cervical esophagus is presented and the relevant literature is reviewed. Our patient could not be diagnosed on preoperative investigations and required an esophagotomy with frozen section. We debulked the mass and the patient is asymptomatic 6 months after surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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10/57. Perioperative management of a patient presenting with a spontaneously ruptured esophagus.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of spontaneous rupture of the esophagus and its anesthetic management. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 52-yr-old male presented with a seven day history of chest pain, respiratory distress, and swelling in the neck following forceful vomiting. Examination revealed hypotension, decreased air entry in the right lower lung field with crepitations, epigastric tenderness with abdominal distension and guarding of both right and left hypochondria. A contrast esophagogram showed extravasation of contrast material from the lower third of the esophagus into the mediastinum without pleural cavity involvement. Reinforced primary closure of a 5-cm transmural tear in the right anterolateral wall of the esophagus 5 cm above the gastro-esophageal junction was performed along with right-sided chest drainage. The anesthetic drugs and technique in this case were selected to avoid any increase in intra-abdominal pressure to prevent further spillage of gastric contents into the mediastinum through the perforation. Invasive monitoring was used to assess early hemodynamic changes and to administer fluid therapy and vasoactive drugs. Due to prolonged surgery, lung congestion, large fluid shifts, a long surgical incision and abnormal arterial blood gases, the patient was ventilated mechanically in the intensive care unit. Subsequently he developed an esophageal leak, septic shock, and multiple organ failure and died. CONCLUSION: In a patient with a spontaneous rupture of esophagus, the anesthetic considerations include avoidance of further aggravation of the esophageal tear, and resuscitation from a morbid inflammatory condition.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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