Cases reported "Esophageal Fistula"

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1/7. subclavian artery aneurysm with oesophagoarterial fistula.

    Aneurysms of the subclavian artery are rare. fistula formation between the subclavian artery and the oesophagus has been described in aberrant subclavian artery and oesophageal foreign body. However, a fistula between a non-aberrant subclavian artery aneurysm and the oesophagus has not been previously reported. In this report, an unusual case of subclavian artery aneurysm with a fistula to the oesophagus causing intractable haematemesis is presented with the angiographic findings.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
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2/7. Fatal aortoesophageal fistula in two cases of tight vascular ring.

    Vascular rings are rare vascular congenital anomalies causing oesophageal and tracheal compression. An aortoesophageal fistula is a devastating, in part iatrogenic, complication of vascular rings. It is seen with increasing frequency, and can be misleading, since differential diagnosis with other causes of haematemesis and melaena is often difficult, especially in infants. We report two infants with aortoesophageal fistulas secondary to double aortic arches forming a vascular ring. In both, the diagnosis was missed, and massive haemorrhage led to death. In both cases, the fissuration on the oesophageal and aortic sides of the fistula had sharp edges, highly suggestive of an iatrogenic laceration caused by manipulation of nasogastric tubes. The key for the diagnosis of vascular rings is, therefore, clinical suspicion and awareness of this condition. Prompt identification in infants with stridor, wheezing, or respiratory distress can prevent prolonged intubation, thus avoiding the formation of an aortoesophageal fistula and hopefully preventing a fatal outcome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
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3/7. vocal cord paralysis and oesophago-broncho-aortic fistula complicating foreign body-induced oesophageal perforation.

    A 61 year old man died after presenting with a 24 h history of haematemesis and haemoptysis, and one year history of hoarseness of voice. Post-mortem examination showed a dental plate eroding through the mid-oesophagus into a bronchus and into the descending arch of the aorta, with scarring suggestive of old perforation. An organized haematoma also involved the left recurrent laryngeal nerve. Vocal cord paralysis may be a manifestation of foreign body-induced oesophageal perforation, which can lead to death from an oesophago-broncho-aortic fistula. Both complications of oesophageal perforation from a foreign body have not to our knowledge been previously reported.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
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4/7. Fatal haematemesis in childhood associated with aorto-oesophageal fistula.

    A case of fatal haematemesis associated with a non-traumatic, non-tuberculous aorto-oesophageal fistula in a 9-year-old Nigerian boy is presented. autopsy revealed two inflamed and ulcerated mild-oesophageal pulsion diverticula, one of which had eroded into the right pleura as a sinus track. The second diverticulum had perforated and caused mediastinitis and eventually aorto-oesophageal fistula which led to the fatal haematemesis. A mild chest injury is seen as a precipitating factor of the haematemesis and not the initiator of the pathology.
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ranking = 7
keywords = haematemesis
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5/7. Fatal haematemesis arising from benign oesophagoatrial fistula.

    An 86 year old woman with a Barrett's oesophagus, a benign oesophageal stricture, and a benign ulcer developed an oesophagoatrial fistula. As in previously reported cases, she died after a massive haematemesis.
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ranking = 5
keywords = haematemesis
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6/7. Left ventriculo-colic fistula--a late complication of colonic interposition for the oesophagus.

    An 18 year old man developed recurrent haematemesis 12 years after colonic interposition for corrosive injury to the oesophagus. A colonic ulcer close to the cologastric anastomosis appeared to have fistulated into the cavity of the left ventricle. This so far unreported complication needs to be considered when patients who have had coloesophageal substitution present with gastrointestinal bleeding.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
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7/7. Fatal haematemesis from an aorto-oesophageal fistula of obscure aetiology: a case report.

    endoscopy, aortography and laparotomy failed to demonstrate a high aorto-oesophageal fistula of obscure aetiology in a woman presenting with haematemesis. Recognition of Chiari's triad: mid-thoracic pain, sentinel arterial haemorrhage, and final exsanguination after a symptom-free interval, and therapeutic embolization as a mode of therapy, are discussed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = haematemesis
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