Cases reported "Esophageal Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/12. Multiple primary cancers of the esophagus and thyroid gland.

    The occurrence of multiple primary cancers in the aerodigestive tract is a well known phenomenon that has been explained by the concept of 'field carcinogenesis'. Metachronous or synchronous esophageal cancer has usually been identified in patients with head and neck cancer, gastric cancer or colon cancer. The incidence of multiple primary cancers of the esophagus and thyroid gland is very low. We treated four patients with synchronous cancers of the cervical esophagus and the thyroid gland. Histologically, all of the esophageal cancers were squamous cell carcinomas. Thyroid cancers were evaluated as papillary carcinoma or follicular carcinoma. Both the esophageal cancer and the thyroid cancer frequently metastasized to lymph nodes. All patients had multiple lymph nodes metastasis from the esophageal or the thyroid cancer. In one patient, both the esophageal and the thyroid cancers were detected in the same lymph node. Three of four patients died from recurrence of esophageal cancer. The prognosis of these patients was poor. In the treatment of esophageal carcinoma, cancers of other organs including the thyroid gland should be carefully investigated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/12. radiation-induced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in situ.

    A report of radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the esophagus is presented. This report indicates that the patient developed the carcinoma in situ many years after chest wall irradiation for breast cancer treatment. A review of the literature with respect to carcinogenesis after radiotherapy is included and recommendations for the follow-up of patients having mediastinal radiation are suggested.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/12. Barrett's esophagus and squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with psychogenic vomiting.

    We report the association of Barrett's esophagus and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the distal esophagus in a young 31-yr-old woman with a history of self-induced psychogenic vomiting. The development of intestinalized columnar mucosa and esophageal cancer in this young patient illustrates the complicated associations between human behavior and pathogenetic mechanisms involved in esophageal carcinogenesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/12. Coexistent multiple adenocarcinomas arising in Barrett's esophagus 23 years after total gastrectomy and esophageal small cell carcinoma.

    A 69-year-old Japanese man undergoing total gastrectomy for multiple gastric ulcers at age 46 was found endoacopically to have multiple esophageal cancers in the upper, mid, and lower esophagus. Esophageal mucosa associated with tumors was replaced with columnar epithelium. He underwent total esophagectomy combined with laryngectomy, pharyngectomy, and lymph node dissection using the large bowel for reconstruction. The resected esophagus had multiple cancers, including well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, and small-cell carcinoma. Barrett's mucosa consisted mainly of specialized columnar epithelium while both junctional and fundic Barrett's epithelium was observed partially but not clearly. This case is indicative of the high and totipotential carcinogenetic risk of Barrett's epithelium and the relationship between duodenal content reflux and esophageal carcinogenesis after total gastrectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/12. gamma-glutamyltransferase, a common marker of human epithelial tumors?

    Having previously established gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) as a marker of experimental carcinogenesis in rat liver, we investigated whether human tumors differ from their tissue or origin by showing a higher activity or different localization of this enzyme histochemically. We found such differences in each of the human carcinomas we examined. The presence of GGT activity in carcinomas arising in organs normally containing little (tongue) or no GGT activity (larynx, urinary bladder, and esophagus) clearly distinguished cancerous from normal epithelium. In the breast, colon and prostate, GGT activity was normally present in a defined anatomical distribution bordering luminal surfaces. Carcinomas arising from these tissues showed a loss of the normal pattern of activity and contained cells with almost homogenous GGT activity in the cytoplasm. Such differences clearly distinguished carcinomatous from normal epithelium in these organs. The increased GGT activity observed in all nine carcinomas arising from seven different organs suggests that GGT may be a common marker of human epithelial tumors and staining for GGT may become a useful tool in the detection of human epithelial neoplasms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/12. Squamous cell papilloma of the esophagus: a tumour probably caused by human papilloma virus (HPV).

    The third well-documented case of an oesophageal squamous cell papilloma in the literature is studied by light microscopy and using an indirect immunoperoxidase-PAP technique. Human papilloma virus (HPV) antigens were found within the nuclei of the superficial dyskeratotic cells and of koilocytes, both of which are characteristic cells found in HPV lesions elsewhere in the body. The findings are discussed in the light of current concepts of HPV lesions in general. It is suggested that this tumour is potentially malignant and that the possible role of HPV in human oesophageal carcinogenesis deserves further study.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/12. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma occurring in the surface epithelium over a benign tumor.

    The coexistence of a benign tumor and carcinoma in the same esophagus is uncommon, while the occurrence of carcinoma in the surface epithelium over a benign tumor is considered to be extremely rare. Among 587 patients with surgically resected esophageal cancer, the cases with carcinoma located over a benign tumor of the esophagus were histopathologically investigated and the carcinogenesis of such cases was discussed. Only three cases were found to have esophageal squamous cell carcinoma located over benign tumors (two were leiomyomas and one was a lipoma). All three benign tumors protruded to the esophageal surface, and the carcinoma was located just over such tumors without coexisting epithelial dysplasia. Moreover, the epithelium, except for portions around these tumors, was intact in all three cases. From these findings it was suggested that chronic stimulation of the epithelium covering the benign tumors might have induced the carcinoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/12. Esophageal cancer after mediastinal irradiation.

    The authors report 4 patients, without a history of tobacco or alcohol abuse, who developed squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus secondary to mediastinal irradiation. Carcinoma of the esophagus developed in 3 women 8-11 years after mediastinal radiotherapy for breast cancer and in a man 9 years after mediastinal radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. Three patients underwent resection, with intrathoracic anastomosis in 2 and cervical in 1. No fistulae were observed despite the presence of esophageal fibrosis. No mediastinal lymph node was metastatic. patients survived 7, 16, and 26 months, respectively, after resection. This study confirms the concept of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. We conclude that patients with dysphagia and a history of previous mediastinal radiotherapy should undergo repeated endoscopy for biopsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/12. Esophageal cancer after mediastinal irradiation.

    The authors report 4 patients, without a history of tobacco or alcohol abuse, who developed squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus secondary to mediastinal irradiation. Carcinoma of the esophagus developed in 3 women 8-11 years after mediastinal radiotherapy for breast cancer and in a man 9 years after mediastinal radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. Three patients underwent resection, with intrathoracic anastomosis in 2 and cervical in 1. No fistulae were observed despite the presence of esophageal fibrosis. No mediastinal lymph node was metastatic. patients survived 7, 16, and 26 months, respectively, after resection. This study confirms the concept of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. We conclude that patients with dysphagia and a history of previous mediastinal radiotherapy should undergo repeated endoscopy for biopsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/12. Human papillomavirus dna in squamous cell carcinomas of the respiratory and upper digestive tracts.

    The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 in clinical samples of squamous cell carcinomas from respiratory and upper digestive tracts was studied. HPV dna of types 16 and/or 18 was detected using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method in 16 out of 121 cases (13.2%). By Southern blot hybridization, however, only the dna from a laryngeal and a tonsillar carcinoma was found to hybridize with the whole HPV 16 dna probe (two out of 16 HPV dna-positive cases by PCR, 12.5%). None of the DNAs hybridized with the whole HPV 18 dna probe. The discrepancy in the results of PCR and Southern blot hybridization methods seemed to reflect their sensitivity. The possible relation between prevalence of HPV dna and carcinogenesis in respiratory and upper digestive tract is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = carcinogenesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Esophageal Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.