Cases reported "Esophageal Neoplasms"

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1/289. Massive pleural effusion and ascites resulting from esophagectomy with extensive lymphadenectomy for cancer of the abdominal esophagus.

    chylothorax is an uncommon but well recognized complication of esophagectomy. We present the case of a 57 year-old man with squamous cell carcinoma of the abdominal esophagus who underwent subtotal esophagectomy by right thoracotomy. Post-operatively, the volume of pleural effusion from the right chest was increased (1600-2000 ml/day). The effusion was straw colored, not changing to milky after meals. The characteristics and composition of the pleural fluid were similar to those of chyle. We therefore treated this patient using methods for treatment of chylothorax, conservatively, by administration of OK-432 and minocycline/hydrochloride into the pleural cavity from the chest tube with success. We discuss the pathophysiology of this unusual condition and its treatment.
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keywords = operative
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2/289. Stomal recurrence invading the cervicothoracic esophagus and upper mediastinum: resectability and the creation of a safe anterior mediastinal tracheostoma.

    Surgical salvage for stomal recurrence is a for midable problem for head and neck surgeons. The two factors of considerable significance are resectability and establishment of a safe anterior mediastinal tracheostoma. A case of stomal recurrence invading the cervicothoracic esophagus and upper mediastinum is presented. Total esophagectomy and upper mediastinal dissection was performed. The esophagus was reconstructed immediately with a pedicled gastric flap. The omentum on the gastric pedicle was wrapped around the trachea to reduce the likelihood of erosion into the great vessels and to supplement the lateral blood supply to the trachea. No serious postoperative complications were observed. We believe that the total esophagectomy improved the resectability, and that the bulk of the gastric pedicle and the use of the omentum prevented significant postoperative complications associated with an anterior mediastinal tracheostoma.
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keywords = operative
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3/289. Lymphoepithelioma-like esophageal carcinoma: report of a case.

    We herein report the rare case of a patient suffering from lymphoepithelioma-like poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. The patient was a 74-year-old woman in whom an esophageal tumor was found during an operation for thyroid cancer. After performing a subtotal thyroidectomy and cervical esophagectomy, esophageal reconstruction was performed using a free jejunal graft. Based on the results of the pathological examination, the esophageal tumor was diagnosed to be primary lymphoepithelioma-like esophageal cancer, not metastasis of either unknown nasopharyngeal cancer or thyroid cancer. Since surgery, she has survived postoperatively for more than 4 years with no evidence of recurrent disease.
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keywords = operative
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4/289. Esophageal carcinoma showing a long stricture due to prominent lymphatic permeation: report of a case.

    Some esophageal diseases such as carcinoma, esophagitis, and collagen diseases have often been reported to show a diffusely thickened esophageal wall in the roentogenogram findings. In the current report, a preoperative upper gastrointestinal series and an endoscopic examination showed a diffusely infiltrative type carcinoma, but other examinations did not suggest any diseases such as esophagitis or collagen diseases which might cause a thickening of the esophageal wall or a constriction of the esophagus. A postoperative histological examination revealed the primary carcinoma to remain only within the mucosal layer, while a large degree of lymphatic vessel permeation reached the adventitia over a wide area. An extraordinary degree of lymphatic permeation spread through the esophageal wall, and stromal fibrosis developed as a result of such lymphatic permeation. These histological phenomena might thus have led to the macroscopic appearance of infiltrative type esophageal carcinoma.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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5/289. coronary artery bypass graft after esophagogastrectomy.

    A 71-year-old male with a history of retrosternal gastric bypass, after a resected esophageal carcinoma, developed angina pectoris due to stenosis of the left main trunk and the left anterior descending artery. The patient was treated with off-pump beating-heart coronary artery bypass approached via left thoracotomy. Two free conduits arising from the left internal mammary artery were utilized for this particular case, since the aortocoronary bypass was impossible due to the severely calcified aorta. Postoperative angiography confirmed good coronary flow and the patient has been symptom free for 6 months.
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keywords = operative
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6/289. aortic valve replacement after retrosternal gastric tube reconstruction for esophageal cancer.

    A 59-year-old man with a history of the thoraco-abdominal esophagus resection with retrosternal gastric tube reconstruction for esophageal cancer complicated by anastomosis leakage and purulent pericarditis was admitted for aortic regurgitation due to infective endocarditis. Floppy vegetation and worsening cardiac failure indicated aortic valve replacement. In a median sternotomy approach, the thickest adhesion between the cervical esophagus and posterior surface of the manubrium sternae was freed using an ultrasonic osteotome. Severe adhesions in the pericardium due to purulent pericarditis were found. Median sternotomy enabled minimal exposure of the aortic root, upper right atrium, and right superior pulmonary vein for instituting extracorporeal circulation and replacing the aortic valve. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. For cardiac surgery in patients with a retrosternal gastric tube, left anterior or right thoracotomy may be considered to avoid gastric tube injury. Median sternotomy, however, is an alternative enabling safe heart exposure, and the ultrasonic osteotome was very useful in incising the sternum without injuring the cervical esophagus, which had no serosa.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/289. Pleural incarceration of the gastric graft after trans-hiatal esophagectomy.

    We report on a 73-year-old man who underwent a transhiatal esophagectomy for a T2N1M0 adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and developed an incarcerated herniation of the gastric graft through a defect in the right mediastinal pleura. The patient experienced delayed gastric emptying postoperatively, which was initially suggested by barium swallow. The gastric herniation was unidentified by early postoperative swallowing studies and endoscopies. After diagnosis by a later computed tomographic scan and barium study, the herniation was reduced by incising the mediastinal pleura from the diaphragm to the apex of the chest and by plication of the stomach longitudinally in order to reduce its intrathoracic diameter.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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8/289. Gastric tube-to-tracheal fistula closed with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    A gastric tube-to-airway fistula is a very rare complication after esophageal reconstruction. A patient with a gastric tube-to-tracheal fistula that developed more than 9 years after surgery for cancer of the cervical esophagus was treated with transposition of a pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. Careful perioperative respiratory management helped save the patient's life.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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9/289. manganese deposition in the brain following parenteral manganese administration in association with radical operation for esophageal cancer: report of a case.

    We report herein the case of a patient in whom manganese (Mn) deposition in the basal ganglia was detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) subsequent to thoracic esophagectomy, performed following perioperative parenteral nutrition. A multi-trace-element supplement solution which included 20 micromol of Mn per day had been parenterally administered for 7 days preoperatively and 21 days postoperatively. The serum level of total bilirubin reached a maximum value of 5.1 mg/dl postoperatively. The T1-weighted MRI on the 32nd postoperative day demonstrated bilateral and symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the globus pallidus and the whole-blood Mn level on the 34th postoperative day was 4.9 microg/l, the normal range being 0.8-2.5 microg/l. This hyperintensity on T1-weighted MRI was gradually improved following normalization of the blood Mn level. This case report serves to demonstrate that even short-term perioperative parenteral nutrition may result in Mn deposition in the brain following radical surgery for esophageal cancer, especially in patients with hyperbilirubinemia.
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ranking = 7
keywords = operative
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10/289. Severe aspiration pneumonia after surgery for reconstructed gastric tube cancer treated with extracorporeal life support.

    A 68-year-old man who had received resection for thoracic esophageal cancer 8 years ago, was operated on for the cancer of the reconstructed gastric tube. On the day of the operation, he accidentally swallowed gastric juice due to an obstruction in the reconstructed gastric tube. He suffered from acute hypoxic respiratory failure which could not be controlled with conventional therapy on postoperative day 1. Therefore, extracorporeal life support was employed at 3.0 L/min. extracorporeal flow for 11 days. Before extracorporeal life support data: PO2/FiO2 = 45, A-aDO2 = 600. During extracorporeal life support, the ventilator setting was pressure control (16 cmH2O) ventilation with a positive end expiratory pressure of 8 cmH2O, respiratory rate of 5 breaths/min., and FiO2 of 0.4. The patient was successfully weaned from extracorporeal life support and extubated on postoperative day 12. After extracorporeal life support data: PO2/FiO2 = 225, A-aDO2 = 465. We report on a successful weaning case from extracorporeal life support and discuss the efficacy these of regarding this patient.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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