Cases reported "Esophageal Stenosis"

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1/110. Gastrojejunal interposition for esophageal replacement.

    The main considerations in replacing the esophagus are to avoid postoperative necrosis of all or part of the graft, leakage or stenosis of the anastomoses, and complications related to acid-peptic or alkaline reflux. A 5-year-old boy, after two unsuccessful thoracic operations for atresia and then stenosis of the esophagus, underwent resection of the esophagus because of duodeno-gastroesophageal reflux. The continuity of the alimentary tract was restored by gastrojejunal interposition. We recommend this method of reconstruction when the esophago-gastrostoma is created in the chest, and the possibility of alkaline reflux must be considered.
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ranking = 1
keywords = reflux
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2/110. Squamous cell papillomatosis of esophagus following placement of a self-expanding metal stent.

    The esophageal self-expanding metal stent has gained widespread acceptance for the management of tracheoesophageal fistulas and the palliative management of malignant esophageal strictures. The complications associated with its use can be classified as either immediate or delayed. The most frequent delayed complications include tumor ingrowth, stent migration, reflux of gastric contents, bleeding, and perforation. This case report illustrates an otherwise unrecognized delayed complication of a self-expanding metal stent. Near complete ingrowth of the stent by squamous mucosal hyperplasia occurred within six weeks of the metal stent's placement. This finding supports the hypothesis that mucosal injury and regeneration underlies the etiology of esophageal squamous cell papilloma formation.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = reflux
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3/110. Peptic esophageal stricture in children.

    INTRODUCTION: Peptic esophageal stricture as a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs in 5% of the affected children. MATERIAL AND methods: Case histories of 6 children treated successfully in the Department of pediatrics and Clinic of Pediatric Surgery were studied. The diagnosis in each case was based on clinical symptoms (vomiting leading to hypothrophy, hematemesis, and anemia), and esophagoscopy, esophageal pH-metry (according to ESPGAN recommendations), and contrast X-ray examination. After evaluation medical treatment was applied in 3 and bougienage with a hard bougie in 6 patients. Because of failure of this treatment Nissen fundoplication and postoperative bougienage were performed in all patients. RESULTS: In all surgically treated patients complete recovery without postoperative complications was achieved. DISCUSSION: The authors give interpretation of the pathogenesis and outline the primary symptoms of the disease. Terms of performance and reliability of the instrumental methods of diagnosing are discussed. The experience in treatment of peptic esophageal stricture in children is presented. CONCLUSIONS: Medical treatment combined with bougienage yields poor results in peptic esophageal stricture and Nissen fundoplication appears to be the treatment of choice.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = reflux
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4/110. Esophageal carcinoma showing a long stricture due to prominent lymphatic permeation: report of a case.

    Some esophageal diseases such as carcinoma, esophagitis, and collagen diseases have often been reported to show a diffusely thickened esophageal wall in the roentogenogram findings. In the current report, a preoperative upper gastrointestinal series and an endoscopic examination showed a diffusely infiltrative type carcinoma, but other examinations did not suggest any diseases such as esophagitis or collagen diseases which might cause a thickening of the esophageal wall or a constriction of the esophagus. A postoperative histological examination revealed the primary carcinoma to remain only within the mucosal layer, while a large degree of lymphatic vessel permeation reached the adventitia over a wide area. An extraordinary degree of lymphatic permeation spread through the esophageal wall, and stromal fibrosis developed as a result of such lymphatic permeation. These histological phenomena might thus have led to the macroscopic appearance of infiltrative type esophageal carcinoma.
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ranking = 84.514962139119
keywords = esophagitis
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5/110. Congenital esophageal stenosis.

    We report 6 new cases of congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) that presented to us with special diagnostic and management problems and review the literature on this subject. gastroesophageal reflux and achalasia are important differential diagnoses of esophageal stenosis, they may be associated with CES making appropriate management even more difficult. Treatment is also controversial, ranging from simple dilatation to segmental resection. CES should be present in every pediatric surgeon's mind should dysphagia occur on the introduction of semisolid food or esophageal food impaction, with a segmental stenosis demonstrated at esophagogram even when more obvious diagnoses are evoked.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = reflux
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6/110. Symptom priority ranking in the care of gastroesophageal reflux: a review of 1,850 cases.

    BACKGROUND: Clinical history remains an important part of the medical evaluation of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia are considered typical symptoms of GERD. Priority rankings of these symptoms can be determined with a standardized questionnaire. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether symptom priority ranking and symptom severity grading can provide useful information in the evaluation of patients with GERD. methods: From 1,850 patients that were analyzed retrospectively, patients with dysphagia unrelated to GERD were excluded. A standardized questionnaire was applied before each patient underwent any esophageal diagnostic study. Priority of symptoms was determined to be primary, secondary, tertiary, or none based on the patient response to the questionnaire. Presence of a stricture was determined either by endoscopy, esophagraphy, or both studies. Stationary esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring were performed on all patients. Through bivariate and multivariate analysis, the relationships among typical GERD symptoms, esophageal reflux-related stenosis, lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and composite score were established. RESULTS: High priority ranking of the symptom dysphagia is predictive of the presence of an esophageal stricture, but has a negative association with abnormal manometric and pH studies. In contrast, high priority ranking of the symptom heartburn and regurgitation are positively associated with abnormal manometric and pH results. CONCLUSIONS: Priority ranking can be a valuable adjunct to objective testing in the evaluation of GERD. In certain clinical situations it can obviate the need for 24-hour pH monitoring.
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ranking = 2
keywords = reflux
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7/110. Congenital esophageal stenosis treated with endoscopic balloon dilation: report of one case.

    Congenital esophageal stenosis is a narrowing of esophageal lumen that is present at birth, and may be asymptomatic in the neonate. Stenosis of the lower esophagus is a very rare form of esophageal obstruction. Three types of congenital esophageal stenosis have been described: fibromuscular stenosis, membranous webs, and tracheobronchial remnants. Fibromuscular stenosis and membranous webs respond to dilation, but must be distinguished from strictures caused by peptic esophagitis. Tracheobronchial remnants generally require surgical therapy. We report a 5-year-old girl with congenital esophageal stenosis, who presented with persistent dysphagia and poor weight gain. An esophagogram showed stricture of lower esophagus with proximal dilatation above esophagogastric junction. She was successfully treated with endoscopic balloon dilation.
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ranking = 42.257481069559
keywords = esophagitis
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8/110. Oesophageal surgery.

    A wide variety of benign conditions affecting the oesophagus which have long been recognized in association with hiatus hernia are now known to be attributable to reflux oesophagitis. The development of modern methods of treatment of these conditions is described with reference to a number of illustrative cases.
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ranking = 42.590814402893
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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9/110. Chronic esophagitis dissecans presenting with esophageal strictures: a case report.

    Chronic esophagitis dissecans superficialis is a rare form of chronic esophagitis producing esophageal cast. Its clinical and histopathologic features have recently been defined. We present a 78-year-old patient with chronic esophagitis dissecans associated with esophageal strictures. The clinical and pathologic features of chronic esophagitis dissecans superficialis are reviewed. The association of chronic esophagitis dissecans superficialis with strictures has not been previously reported.
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ranking = 380.31732962603
keywords = esophagitis
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10/110. Esophagobronchial fistula combined with a peptic esophageal stenosis.

    Peptic strictures are a rare complication of severe gastroesophageal reflux disease. An esophagobronchial fistula as a complication of a severe long-term reflux esophagitis with peptic stenosis is here described for the first time: A 43-year-old mentally disabled patient suffered from recurrent bronchopneumonia. endoscopy revealed an esophagobronchial fistula originating in a peptic stricture. Under short-term fasting, intravenous feeding and application of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) closure of this fistula was achieved within 4 days. Subsequently, dilatation was carried out. The case demonstrates that pulmonary complications in patients with peptic esophageal strictures may not only be due to aspiration of refluxate but--rarely--also to fistulae between the esophagus and the bronchial tree.
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ranking = 43.257481069559
keywords = esophagitis, reflux
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