Cases reported "Esophageal Stenosis"

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1/88. Gastrojejunal interposition for esophageal replacement.

    The main considerations in replacing the esophagus are to avoid postoperative necrosis of all or part of the graft, leakage or stenosis of the anastomoses, and complications related to acid-peptic or alkaline reflux. A 5-year-old boy, after two unsuccessful thoracic operations for atresia and then stenosis of the esophagus, underwent resection of the esophagus because of duodeno-gastroesophageal reflux. The continuity of the alimentary tract was restored by gastrojejunal interposition. We recommend this method of reconstruction when the esophago-gastrostoma is created in the chest, and the possibility of alkaline reflux must be considered.
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2/88. Entrapment and obstruction of the esophagus from thoracic spine hyperextension-dislocation injury.

    We have reported a unique case of esophageal entrapment and obstruction from a thoracic spine hyperextension-dislocation injury after a motor vehicle crash. Because the risk for esophageal injury is not typically associated with thoracic spine injury, a heightened sensitivity for developing symptoms and signs is at least necessary. As with any injury to the gastrointestinal tract, optimal therapy requires resuscitation and prompt operative intervention.
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3/88. Peptic esophageal stricture in children.

    INTRODUCTION: Peptic esophageal stricture as a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs in 5% of the affected children. MATERIAL AND methods: Case histories of 6 children treated successfully in the Department of pediatrics and Clinic of Pediatric Surgery were studied. The diagnosis in each case was based on clinical symptoms (vomiting leading to hypothrophy, hematemesis, and anemia), and esophagoscopy, esophageal pH-metry (according to ESPGAN recommendations), and contrast X-ray examination. After evaluation medical treatment was applied in 3 and bougienage with a hard bougie in 6 patients. Because of failure of this treatment Nissen fundoplication and postoperative bougienage were performed in all patients. RESULTS: In all surgically treated patients complete recovery without postoperative complications was achieved. DISCUSSION: The authors give interpretation of the pathogenesis and outline the primary symptoms of the disease. Terms of performance and reliability of the instrumental methods of diagnosing are discussed. The experience in treatment of peptic esophageal stricture in children is presented. CONCLUSIONS: Medical treatment combined with bougienage yields poor results in peptic esophageal stricture and Nissen fundoplication appears to be the treatment of choice.
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keywords = operative
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4/88. Esophageal carcinoma showing a long stricture due to prominent lymphatic permeation: report of a case.

    Some esophageal diseases such as carcinoma, esophagitis, and collagen diseases have often been reported to show a diffusely thickened esophageal wall in the roentogenogram findings. In the current report, a preoperative upper gastrointestinal series and an endoscopic examination showed a diffusely infiltrative type carcinoma, but other examinations did not suggest any diseases such as esophagitis or collagen diseases which might cause a thickening of the esophageal wall or a constriction of the esophagus. A postoperative histological examination revealed the primary carcinoma to remain only within the mucosal layer, while a large degree of lymphatic vessel permeation reached the adventitia over a wide area. An extraordinary degree of lymphatic permeation spread through the esophageal wall, and stromal fibrosis developed as a result of such lymphatic permeation. These histological phenomena might thus have led to the macroscopic appearance of infiltrative type esophageal carcinoma.
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keywords = operative
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5/88. Cricopharyngeal achalasia--a cause of major dysphagia in a newborn. A case report.

    Cricopharyngeal achalasia is a rare cause of neonatal dysphagia. Its treatment is based on surgical myotomy, which is to be avoided in the presence of prematurity and neurological diseases. The authors report a case of cricopharyngeal achalasia in a full-term four-month-old female baby. Coughing and choking during feeds were the major symptoms. The diagnosis was made peroperatively although barium meal and endoscopic findings were suggestive. After cricopharyngeal myotomy, symptoms took several weeks to disappear. Seven months after surgery, she feeds normally and weighs 7,700 g. Neonatal cricopharyngeal achalasia could be a foregoing state to cricopharyngeal diverticula in adult. Some cases may remain undiagnosed either due to lack of symptoms or sudden infant death.
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6/88. Double aortic arch: diagnosis missed for 29 years.

    Double aortic arch is a rare vascular anomaly which causes tracheal and esophageal compression usually in the first months of life. Typical symptoms in the early childhood should lead to prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment of this malformation. In adults this anomaly is extremely rare. A case of a severely 29-year-old symptomatic woman is presented. Despite characteristic symptoms, the diagnosis was missed during childhood. The importance of different diagnostic procedures and operative therapy is discussed. Preoperative angiography can be replaced by the less invasive magnetic imaging and computed tomography. Surgical operation should also be performed in oligosymptomatic patients to prevent late complications.
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keywords = operative
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7/88. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis associated with esophageal perforation.

    We report a rare case of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis with lower esophageal stricture which perforated into the peritoneal cavity after the patient vomited. A 61-year-old man was admitted with severe chest and epigastric pain after dysphagia and vomiting. Under a diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal perforation, laparotomy was performed. The anterior wall of the abdominal esophagus was found to have ruptured, and proximal gastrectomy with abdominal esophagectomy was performed. Histological examination revealed esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis with esophageal stricture distal to the site of rupture, and postoperative endoscopy showed diffuse pseudodiverticulosis in the remaining esophagus. The patient is free of symptoms 5 years after the surgery. This case suggests that careful treatment may be indicated in patients with esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis with stricture and elevated intraluminal pressure, to minimize the possibility of severe complications such as esophageal perforation.
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keywords = operative
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8/88. An operation for the treatment of intractable peptic stricture of the esophagus.

    The current management of severe strictures of the esophagus resulting from reflux esophagitis is unsatisfactory. A new operation comprising esophagoplasty and intrathoracic fundoplication is described. This preliminary report records the results of this operation in 10 patients. There was one operative death. Of the nine survivors, followed for six months to three years, seven are completely free of symptoms. The remaining two have mild residual symptoms, but no dysphagia.
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keywords = operative
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9/88. Dysphagia lusoria: a case study.

    Dysphagia lusoria is described in the literature as difficulty swallowing because of a "jest of nature." The "jest of nature" is a birth defect encompassing any aortic root vascular anomaly that causes esophageal dysphagia. persons with dysphagia lusoria can be categorized according to their specific subclavian anomaly (ie, depending on the presence of an aneurysm, occlusive disease, or esophageal compression). All patients with this anomaly have an aberrant subclavian artery in a transposed position that courses posterior to the esophagus. The operative approach to repair this condition has been controversial. An extrathoracic approach is documented as superior to a repair involving thoracotomy because there is decreased rate of complications that may be associated with a thoracotomy and greater visibility of the subclavian and carotid artery. This case study describes a 25-year-old woman with dysphagia lusoria related to an aberrant right subclavian artery. The report includes a literature review and describes the perioperative approach and nursing care. The use of the preadmission and same-day admission services are supported as is an extrathoracic surgical approach. At follow-up this patient reported no symptoms of dysphagia and showed no evidence of esophageal compression confirming that persons with symptomatic dysphagia lusoria can be managed with positive long-term results.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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10/88. Self-expandable metallic stent therapy of esophagojejunal stricture in a stapled anastomosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    The introduction of the stapler apparatus has provided safe and effective gastrointestinal anastomotic surgical operations for most surgeons. However, the major disadvantage of stapler surgery is an increased risk of anastomotic stricture formation. Treatment of this kind of stricture is performed mainly by using endoscopic balloon dilators. However, this therapy may fail or the patient may become reactive or uncooperative during dilatation sessions. Herein, we present a case to show the successful and uncomplicated insertion of a self-expanding metallic stent into an esophagojejunal anastomotic stricture which developed 1 month after total gastrectomy and stapled esophagojejunal anastomosis in a patient with gastric carcinoma. This is the 3rd report in the literature.
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keywords = operative
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