Cases reported "Esophagitis"

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1/9. Surgical management of necrotizing Candida esophagitis.

    Invasive esophageal candidiasis produced transmural necrosis leading to perforation in 2 patients aged 10 and 27 years. Both patients survived after esophageal resection and complete diversion. One patient with acute leukemia and neutropenia experienced systemic candidiasis, which resolved after esophagectomy. esophagectomy and diversion for yeast-induced necrosis may lead to complete recovery and resolution of disseminated candidiasis when combined with systemic antifungal therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = necrotizing
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2/9. Acute necrotizing esophagitis: a case report.

    Acute necrotizing esophagitis is rare. The exact etiology is unknown in most cases. The esophagus appears black, necrotic and ulcerated on the upper endoscopy, thus the term "black esophagus" is used. Histologically, there is necrosis of the esophageal mucosa and submucosa. Here, we present a patient with cholangiocarcinoma who had upper gastrointestinal bleeding and was found to have acute necrotizing esophagitis on the upper endoscopy.
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ranking = 29.169791347736
keywords = acute necrotizing, necrotizing
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3/9. Infectious necrotizing esophagitis: outcome after medical and surgical intervention.

    BACKGROUND: Immunodeficiency predisposes to invasive esophageal infections. The treatment of perforation, respiratory fistula, and necrosis due to transmural esophageal infection is guided by anecdote. We wish to determine treatment and outcome of local complications of necrotizing esophagitis. methods: We report our experience over a 7-year period and review published reports since 1976. We treated 4 patients and found 21 reported patients with perforation (11/25), fistula (8/25), and necrosis (6/25) at a mean age of 35 years. Twenty-one patients were immunodeficient (84%) due to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in 8, acute leukemia in 6, renal transplant in 3, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and corticosteroids in 1 each. Pathogenic organisms were fungal in 15 cases, viral in 7, and bacterial in 7. RESULTS: Treatment consisted of antibiotic therapy in 13 patients and surgical intervention combined with antibiotic therapy in 12: esophagectomy in 6, esophageal stenting and drainage in 2, drainage alone in 2, and salivary diversion in 2. overall mortality was 48% (12/25). mortality without surgical intervention was 90% (9/10) and with surgical intervention 27% (3/11). One of 6 patients undergoing esophagectomy (17%) died. The difference in mortality was due to sepsis, which was the cause of death in 8 patients treated with medical intervention and only 1 treated with surgical intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Local complications of necrotizing esophagitis have a high mortality due to sepsis. Surgical intervention, in particular esophagectomy, controls sepsis in published case reports and should be considered in selected patients. Further study is required to determine the true prevalence of these complications and the outcome of intervention.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = necrotizing
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4/9. Fatal necrotizing esophagitis due to penicillium chrysogenum in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Although blue-green molds of the genus Penicillium are ubiquitous in the human environment, invasive penicilliosis is uncommon and primarily encountered among immunosuppressed patients. A patient with hiv infection who died of severe necrotizing esophagitis caused by penicillium chrysogenum is reported and the relevant English language literature on human penicilliosis is reviewed. Although infectious esophagitis is commonly associated with AIDS, Penicillium esophagitis has not been described in such patients.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = necrotizing
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5/9. Isolated oesophageal involvement of Crohn's disease.

    A 31-year-old male was admitted with complaints of dysphagia and odynophagia. An upper gastrointestinal tract series revealed inflammatory changes in the mid and distal oesophagus with intramural extravasation of the barium. An upper endoscopy showed multiple ulcerations and inflammation. The patient developed a large stricture with no response to serial endoscopic dilations and a surgical resection of the oesophagus was required. Gross examination of the surgical specimen revealed transmural inflammation, deep ulcerations and non-necrotizing epithelioid cell granuloma. All these pathological findings were characteristic of Crohn's disease of the oesophagus. After 36 months of follow-up there has been no recurrence of symptoms or of other sites of involvement.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = necrotizing
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6/9. Acute necrotizing esophagitis.

    esophagitis of varying degrees and significance is caused by reflux, infections, radiation, and ingestion of chemical agents. A case of necrotizing esophagitis, seen as a black esophagus on endoscopy in a postoperative patient and resulting in long tubular stricture which ultimately required esophagectomy, is reported. Although the course of necrotizing esophagitis may parallel that associated with ischemia, severe caustic injury, or overwhelming infection, its etiology is uncertain. Diminished mucosal defenses, microbial implantation by a nasogastric tube placed perioperatively or sepsis, and transient ischemia with oxyradical formation and resultant reperfusion injury are hypothesized as important causative factors in the pathogenesis of acute necrotizing esophagitis.
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ranking = 29.419791347736
keywords = acute necrotizing, necrotizing
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7/9. culture-proven cytomegalovirus retinitis in a homosexual man with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    A 35-year-old homosexual man with cytomegalovirus viremia developed retinitis. He also had a new syndrome consisting of a persistent T-lymphocyte deficit, pneumocystis pneumonia, recurrent candida albicans esophagitis, skin ulcerations caused by herpes simplex virus, Type 2, disseminated mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection, and molluscum contagiosum. Histopathologic examination revealed bilateral necrotizing retinitis with virions in retinal, choroidal, and optic nerve tissues. Postmortem cultures of retina and vitreous were positive for cytomegalovirus.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = necrotizing
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8/9. Fatal Candida esophagitis in two diabetics after renal transplantation.

    Severe necrotizing Candida esophagitis developed in two insulin-dependent diabetics after they received renal allografts. In each patient, the infection led to a perforation of the esophagus and was ultimately fatal despite aggressive medical and surgical management. The frequency and severity of Candida esophagitis seems to be higher in diabetics rather than in nondiabetic patients who received renal transplants. In these two diabetic transplant recipients, small doses of oral nystatin did not prevent Candida esophagitis. Appropriate diagnostic tests must be performed promptly when symptoms of odynophagia or dysphagia develop in these patients. In diabetic transplant recipients with documented candidiasis, decreased symptoms of esophagitis should not be relied on to indicate a response to therapy. Discontinuation of immunosuppressive drugs, as well as aggressive treatment with oral and parenterally absorbed antifungal agents, offer the best hope for preventing severe morbidity or mortality from the infection in these patients.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = necrotizing
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9/9. Necrotizing esophagitis presenting as a black esophagus.

    A case of necrotizing esophagitis discovered during upper endoscopy is described. An 88-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of multiple episodes of coffee ground emesis and dysphagia over 3 months. ischemia is proposed as the etiology of necrotizing esophagitis on the basis of the patient's significant cardiac history, her age, and low-flow state.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = necrotizing
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