Cases reported "Essential Tremor"

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1/47. Postural and action myoclonus in patients with parkinsonian type multiple system atrophy.

    patients with a parkinsonian syndrome and features of multisystem atrophy (pMSA) may exhibit abnormal movements of the hands and fingers, which are reported in the literature either as "jerky" tremor or myoclonus. We studied clinically and electrophysiologically these movements in 11 consecutive patients with pMSA. No abnormal movements were observed when the patients were at complete rest, except for a characteristic parkinsonian "pill-rolling" tremor in one patient. Abnormal small-amplitude, nonrhythmic movements involving just one or a few fingers, or more rarely the whole hand, were observed in nine patients when holding a posture or at the beginning of an action. Accelerometric recordings showed small-amplitude irregular oscillations which, contrary to those of patients with tremor, had no predominant peak in the Fast Fourier frequency spectrum analysis. Electromyographic recordings in the forearm and hand muscles showed brief jerks of less than 100 ms duration which were synchronous in antagonist muscles of the forearm and alternated with brief periods of silence. Electrical stimulation of the digital nerves evoked consistent reflex responses in the wrist flexor and extensor muscles at a latency of 55.3 /-4.1 ms (range, 50-63 ms). Routine electroencephalographic (EEG) and somatosensory evoked potentials to median nerve stimulation were normal. back-averaging of the EEG activity time-locked to the jerks was performed in two patients with no evidence of abnormal cortical activity. Two patients had episodes of transient respiratory failure related to pneumonia. This caused a long-lasting enhancement of the abnormal hand and finger movements, which became larger and more widespread, with features of posthypoxic myoclonus. We conclude that the abnormal hand and finger movements of patients with pMSA are a form of postural and action myoclonus, and can be described as mini-polymyoclonus.
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keywords = tremor, action
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2/47. Neuropsychological functioning in a patient with essential tremor with and without bilateral VIM stimulation.

    The effects of deep brain stimulation on motor functions, cognitive abilities, and mood were assessed in an 80-year-old, right-handed male with a chronic history of essential tremor. electrodes were implanted bilaterally in the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus during a single operation. Upon evaluation at 3 months postsurgery, bilateral stimulation was associated with a clinically significant reduction in tremor ratings and improvement in manual dexterity. At that time, a battery of neuropsychological measures was administered with and without bilateral stimulation. The patient demonstrated comparable performances on measures of visuospatial perception, attention, mental tracking, verbal learning, and verbal recognition memory in both the "on" and "off" conditions. Without stimulation, the patient demonstrated declines of greater than 1 SD on measures of verbal fluency and verbal recall compared to when the stimulators were active. Responses to mood rating scales also indicated greater subjective distress without stimulation. Results are discussed in the context of previous studies of the effects of thalamic stimulation on neurocognitive functioning.
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keywords = tremor
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3/47. dystonia in a patient treated with propranolol and gabapentin.

    We present a 68-year-old patient with essential tremor who was treated with propranolol hydrochloride (80 mg daily) and gabapentin (900 mg daily) after a history of mild success of gabapentin alone in relieving his symptoms. The patient had several daily episodes of paroxysmal dystonic movements in both hands. After reducing the propranolol dose to 40 mg daily, the dystonic movements resolved. This case suggests a synergistic effect between propranolol and gabapentin.
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keywords = tremor
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4/47. Efficacy of unilateral deep brain stimulation of the thalamic ventralis intermedius nucleus in a patient with bipolar disorder associated with klinefelter syndrome and essential tremor. Case report.

    deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventralis intermedius nucleus (Vim) is a safe and effective treatment for essential tremor. bipolar disorder and essential tremor had each been reported to occur in association with klinefelter syndrome but the three diseases have been reported to occur together in only one patient. The genetic basis and natural history of these disorders are not completely understood and may be related rather than coincidental. The authors report on a 23-year-old man with klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) and bipolar disorder who was treated successfully with unilateral DBS of the thalamic Vim for essential tremor.
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ranking = 2.3333292584516
keywords = tremor
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5/47. Long-term deep brain stimulation in a patient with essential tremor: clinical response and postmortem correlation with stimulator termination sites in ventral thalamus. Case report.

    essential tremor can be suppressed with chronic, bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventralis intermedius nucleus (Vim), the cerebellar receiving area of the motor thalamus. The goal in this study was to correlate the location of the electrodes with the clinical efficacy of DBS in a patient with essential tremor. The authors report on a woman with essential tremor in whom chronic bilateral DBS directed to the ventral thalamus produced adequate tremor suppression until her death from unrelated causes 16 months after placement of the electrodes. Neuropathological postmortem studies of the brain in this patient demonstrated that both stimulators terminated in the Vim region of the thalamus, and that chronic DBS elicited minor reactive changes confined to the immediate vicinity of the electrode tracks. Although the authors could not identify neuropathological abnormalities specific to essential tremor, they believe that suppression of essential tremor by chronic DBS correlates with bilateral termination of the stimulators in the Vim region of the thalamus.
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ranking = 3.3333275120737
keywords = tremor
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6/47. Clinical-molecular study of a family with essential tremor, late onset seizures and periodic paralysis.

    We report the clinical features of, and the molecular study performed on, a Spanish family with essential tremor (ET), late onset epilepsy and autosomal dominant hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoPP). The presence of hypoPP in this kindred suggested an ion channel as a candidate gene for ET. Our study identified an Arg528His CACNL1A3 mutation in patients with hypoPP, and excluded this mutation as the cause of tremor or epilepsy in this kindred.
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ranking = 1.9999965072442
keywords = tremor
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7/47. Simultaneous thalamic deep brain stimulation and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation is becoming increasingly popular for the control of drug-refractory tremor. Implantable cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators are commonly used therapeutic modalities. Concerns exist about the potential interactions between these 2 devices in the same patient, but no experience has been reported previously. We describe a patient with essential tremor who had a deep brain stimulator implanted into the left ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus, who subsequently needed an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Despite concerns about possible interactions between the 2 types of implanted electrical devices (i.e., a situation similar to drug-drug interactions), the deep brain stimulator and the implanted pacemaker-defibrillator functioned appropriately, and no interaction occurred in our patient.
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ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = tremor, action
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8/47. Thalamic stimulation for primary writing tremor.

    We report a patient with primary writing tremor whose tremor was treated with thalamic stimulation. He had undergone trials of multiple oral medications with no benefit for his tremor. An electrode lead was implanted in the thalamic nucleus ventralis intermedius with nearly complete control of his tremor and no postoperative complications. We conclude that nucleus ventralis intermedius thalamic stimulation is safe and effective for primary writing tremor.
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ranking = 2.9999947608663
keywords = tremor
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9/47. Playing harp, another unusual task-specific dystonia.

    Herein we report a task-specific dystonia in a 48-year-old woman, with an unusual association between a familial harp-playing dystonia and essential tremor.
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ranking = 0.33333275120737
keywords = tremor
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10/47. Case of essential palatal tremor: atypical features and remarkable benefit from botulinum toxin injection.

    We describe a 21-year-old man with essential palatal tremor. The patient had rhythmic contractions not only of tensor veli palatini but also of facial, lingual, temporalis, pharyngeal, and neck muscles. He had some voluntary control of palatal tremor and ear clicks. He was treated with 5 units of botulinum toxin-A (BOTOX) injected into each tensor veli palatini, and had complete resolution of all the symptoms.
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ranking = 1.9999967983072
keywords = tremor, action
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