Cases reported "Exophthalmos"

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1/19. Pneumatocele of the orbit.

    PURPOSE: To describe an uncommon sinus condition that can cause proptosis. methods: Intermittent unilateral proptosis and diplopia developed in a 29-year-old man. Computed tomography showed an enlarged frontal sinus with erosion of the floor of the sinus and air in the orbit. RESULTS: Endoscopic ethmoidectomy and frontal sinusotomy corrected an outlet check valve of the nasal frontal duct and eliminated the proptosis. CONCLUSION: Pneumatocele of the orbit is an uncommon cause of proptosis and diplopia and can be corrected with endoscopic sinus surgery.
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2/19. exophthalmos and orbital floor thickening related to maxillary sinusitis.

    A 59-year-old woman presented with periocular pain and 1.5 mm of relative proptosis. A computed tomography scan demonstrated thickening of the orbital floor, and an endoscopic sinusectomy revealed chronic sinusitis. Although cases of maxillary sinus disease with orbital floor thickening have been reported, these findings are in contrast to cases of silent sinus syndrome, in which maxillary sinus disease induces thinning and inferior displacement of the orbital floor with secondary enophthalmos and hypoglobus. Thus, while chronic maxillary sinus disease may create negative antral pressure and inferior displacement of the orbital floor, whether orbital floor thinning or thickening occurs varies with each case. The present case represents a combination of maxillary sinusitis with orbital floor thickening and exophthalmos, a less common manifestation of maxillary sinus-related orbitopathy.
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3/19. Unilateral exophthalmos caused by an anterior ethmoidal meningoencephalocele.

    A case of unilateral enophthalmos in a 1-year-old child is presented. This was caused by a meningoencephalocele that originated in the anterior cranial fossa and protruded into the orbit through a bony defect at the junction of the frontal and ethmoid bones at the site of the anterior ethmoid canal. This meningoencephalocele was reduced, and the dura was repaired with a temporalis fascia graft. A split calvarial bone graft was inserted into the floor of the orbit, and lateral canthal ligament elevation completed the operative correction.
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4/19. Untreated 'blow-in' fracture of the orbital floor causing a mucocele: report of an unusual late complication.

    BACKGROUND: Several severe complications have been described with blow-in fractures. Therefore, immediate surgical treatment of these fractures has been recommended. To date, there is only minimal knowledge on long-term complications of blow-in fractures that have remained untreated. The present case report describes a late complication of an untreated blow-in fracture of the orbital floor. CASE: A 37-year-old male was involved in a car accident 16 years before. At that time, a non-dislocated midfacial fracture was diagnosed and remained untreated because of the lack of clinical symptoms. Four months before surgery an exophthalmos of the left globe began to develop. CT examination revealed a consolidated blow-in fracture of the left orbital floor and an opaque mass around the dislocated bony fragments. By an infraorbital approach the bony fragments and the surrounding mass were removed. Histological examination of the removed material revealed a cystic structure lined with respiratory epithelium. Therefore, the diagnosis 'post-traumatic mucocele in the orbit caused by dislocated respiratory epithelium from the maxillary sinus' was made. CONCLUSION: Even if blow-in fractures do not cause complications immediately after trauma, late complications like mucoceles can occur after several symptom-free years. Therefore, early reconstruction should be intended even in asymptomatic cases of blow-in fractures with minimal displacement of the bony fragments.
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5/19. Silent sinus syndrome, a case presentation.

    "Silent Sinus syndrome" is a quite rare condition of otherwise asymptomatic maxillary sinusitis that presents with enophthalmos. Despite the fact that the "Silent Sinus syndrome" presents with enophthalmos, these patients are finally treated by the otorhinolaryngologist, who should be familiar with this condition, in order to facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a 33 year old man with enophthalmos and no other associated symptom that was caused by chronic rhinosinusitis. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was the treatment of choice. No reconstruction of the orbital floor was performed. One year follow up, following surgical treatment revealed an excellent result.
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6/19. Compressive optic neuropathy after use of oxidized regenerated cellulose in orbital surgery: review of complications, prophylaxis, and treatment.

    PURPOSE: We report 2 cases of compressive optic neuropathy after use of oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC) in orbital surgery. To our knowledge, no complications have been reported previously after use of this material in orbital surgery. We also review the complications related to its retention at operative sites outside the orbit and recommend precautions to avoid them. DESIGN: Retrospective interventional case reports. PARTICIPANTS: Two patients with compressive optic neuropathy after use of ORC in orbital surgery. methods: case reports from 2 different clinics and review of the English scientific literature. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Best-corrected visual acuity, extraocular motility, proptosis, and chemosis. RESULTS: One patient underwent orbital exploration and biopsy of an orbital tumor, and the second had repair of an orbital floor fracture. Postoperatively, both presented with chemosis, ophthalmoplegia, and progressive loss of vision. Orbital imaging revealed a retrobulbar soft-tissue density compatible with hematoma. Repeat orbital exploration revealed the soft-tissue mass to be swollen ORC. CONCLUSIONS: Retained intraorbital ORC may cause a compartment syndrome and should be suspected in postoperative patients with orbital symptoms. When ORC is used around the optic nerve, it should be removed after hemostasis is achieved.
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7/19. Transantral orbital decompression for compressive optic neuropathy due to sphenoid ridge meningioma.

    We present a case of unilateral exophthalmos and compressive optic neuropathy due to sphenoid ridge meningioma. The patient underwent transantral orbital decompression with removal of the orbital floor and medial wall that resulted in rapid, dramatic normalization of both visual acuity and visual field in the involved eye. Due to the slow-growing, noninfiltrative nature of meningiomas, we propose this procedure as an alternative, initial, palliative treatment for selected cases of compressive optic neuropathy due to meningioma compressing the posterior orbit. This procedure can provide restoration of visual function with less risk to the patient than neurosurgical resection.
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8/19. How much does moving the lateral wall help in expanding the orbit?

    A case is presented in which a unilateral "orbital decompression" had been previously performed, down-fracturing the orbital floor and in-fracturing the medial orbital wall. Because of persistent bilateral exophthalmos, a four-wall orbital expansion was performed. Orbital volume determinations were made before and after the second procedure, making it possible to compare the effects of the two operations.
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9/19. Late orbital implant migration.

    A 29-year-old woman underwent two orbital explorations in 12 years after orbital floor fracture repair with placement of a silicone implant. Recurrent diplopia, proptosis, and pain developed, suggesting an insidious orbital process. Computed tomography findings were instrumental in the patient's diagnostic evaluation.
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10/19. Malar fractures associated with exophthalmos.

    Although fracture of the malar bone is often associated with enlargement of the orbit and subsequent development of enophthalmos, occasionally, a blowin type of orbital floor fracture and exophthalmos occurs. The causes of the injury and the differential diagnosis of the blowin fracture are reviewed. An explanation is offered for the development of the symptoms. Early recognition, open reduction and fixation of the malar bone, and repair of the floor of the orbit defect are important for successful management of the injury.
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